Go Back   Jeep Garage - Jeep Forum > Jeep Platform Discussion > Grand Cherokee - WK2 - > 2014+ Jeep Grand Cherokee Ecodiesel 3.0

Join Jeep Garage Today
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
  #37  
Old 01-05-2014, 10:07 AM
The Evil Twin's Avatar
Member
My Jeep: 2011 5.7L WK2
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Gainesville, VA
Posts: 341
Thanks: 0
Thanked 12 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 361123
The Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond reputeThe Evil Twin has a reputation beyond repute
Garage
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

Now if you look at my signature you will see that I am biased towards Amsoil, buuuut I can certainly attest to the performance of their oils. Two independent companies took my UOA on a race bike that had 1000 race miles on the oil. That is 1000 miles at an average of 10,000 rpm and coolant temps >220*f. They confirmed that I could run that oil longer if I wanted to.
FWIW, you do not have to pay the dealer fee to buy Amsoil. Anyone can. It does offer some discounts though. So if you are doing 2 oil changes a year the savings more than cover the fee.
Quote:
Originally Posted by crabman View Post
The intermittent part is something else to think about because it is actually a defined place. I've included a link to a youtube video that will likely bore a lot of people discussing some things about oils and temperatures. Its a rep talking but there is some good information.
Nice find, Crabman! I knew there was nothing to be concerned about until well over 300*f but couldn't remember how high.
Quote:
Originally Posted by talltale View Post
I'm under the impression for most modern oils thermal breakdown starts at around 275 F.
Nope fast forward to the 4:09 mark in Crabby's video.
Quote:
Originally Posted by BossHoss View Post
FWIW there are thousands and thousands of Harleys running stop and go traffic in summer heat at 260-270 oil temps without any adverse effects on the oil. I have seen mine there many times.
Yessir! I got caught in weekend traffic at Niagara Falls and had 277* oil for probably 30+ minutes on my R1200 (air cooled boxer). No warning lights. I sent the oil in for a analysis at 5000 miles and was told it could go longer.
__________________

__________________
#132-CCS Racing

2014 Sponsors: Amsoil, www.DC-MOTO.net, Manassas Honda Kawasaki Suzuki, www.MARRC.org
Amsoil 5w-20 synthetic meets Chrysler MS-6395 for my Jeep!
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 01-05-2014, 11:18 PM
racer-xerols's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 144
Thanks: 0
Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 438
racer-xerols has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

This whole discussion rings of a conversation I had with the makers of the motorcycles I ride. They added a system voltage monitor to the instrument cluster, and people were freaking out about how the V dropped at idle. "Too much information at the customers hands is NOT always a good thing".

Basically...if the light doesn't come on...don't worry about it.

Sure, we're seeing higher temps than we're used to. But speaking from personal experience...I'm "used to" seeing the temps that my '72 Satellite will run, or my 220k mile '01 Cummins will run. New engines, and new fluids, have much higher tolerances and specs than the older ones. And don't forget this engine requires a SPECIFIC oil - probably...for a reason.

Yes, EGT is the concern for a diesel when towing. I have boost and EGT gauges in my Cummins (it's a stick so no use for trans temp). It's a six speed. When towing (I work for an RV dealer so it happens a lot) I will downshift from 6 to 5 for even the slightest grade. Not only does it keep me from losing MPH, but it knocks a few hundred degrees off my EGTs. In automatic-speak....take it out of Eco, or put it in Sport. More RPM will equal more airflow through the engine, more coolant flow through the engine, more oil flow through the engine...and lower EGT's. Sure, lower RPM means better MPG...but for a couple bucks in fuel, I'd rather take better care of my engine internals. And to clarify a statement made earlier in the thread - more fuel flow equals LOWER EGT's. Fuel is a "coolant", if you will, and engines run hot when they run lean. In racing-speak - "lean is mean"...but you can melt important things like valves or pistons if you're too lean and too hot. Goose it and throw some more fuel at it, and it'll cool it off a bit.

Remember - our VM Motori's are high tech. Cooling oil jets spray the underside of the pistons. The rods are cracked-iron design with angled cap seams for clearance, because they're so beefy and wouldn't fit with a standard 90 degree seam. The mains aren't individual, but girdled...and they're still four-bolt design. The oil sump pickup tube is the same size as a Duramax tube. This is a pretty serious motor.

If it were me towing with one (I have the Cummins, so that gets my "drag something heavy" work), I'd slap it in S mode and go. If the warning light doesn't come on...don't sweat it. And, follow your "severe duty" oil change schedule.

And any time you work it hard...MAKE SURE YOU IDLE IT FOR 90 SECONDS BEFORE TURNING IT OFF. That circulates cooling oil and coolant through the turbocharger, and keeps it from "coking" into dry carbon and ruining your turbo.
__________________

__________________
'14 WK2 Summit EcoDiesel
'01 Ram 2500 QCLB Cummins 6spd 4x4, '92 XJ 4.0/auto, '92 YJ 4.0/stick, 91 Daytona CS/AGS, original owner, 89 Shelby CSX-VNT #135, 87 Shelby CSX #133, 86 Shelby GLHS #499...and 7 Buell motorcycles from 1995-2009
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to racer-xerols For This Useful Post:
  #39  
Old 04-01-2014, 03:38 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 184
cmblue1 is on a distinguished road
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

I am going to the dealer tonight, I will ask them about normal transmission and oil temperatures while towing and how hot is considered "too hot"?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 04-01-2014, 04:47 PM
ExcursionDiesel's Avatar
Premium Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: W. TN.
Posts: 1,564
Thanks: 4
Thanked 221 Times in 149 Posts
Rep Power: 2935
ExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

Quote:
Originally Posted by racer-xerols View Post
Yes, EGT is the concern for a diesel when towing. I have boost and EGT gauges in my Cummins (it's a stick so no use for trans temp). It's a six speed. When towing (I work for an RV dealer so it happens a lot) I will downshift from 6 to 5 for even the slightest grade. Not only does it keep me from losing MPH, but it knocks a few hundred degrees off my EGTs. In automatic-speak....take it out of Eco, or put it in Sport. More RPM will equal more airflow through the engine, more coolant flow through the engine, more oil flow through the engine...and lower EGT's. Sure, lower RPM means better MPG...but for a couple bucks in fuel, I'd rather take better care of my engine internals. And to clarify a statement made earlier in the thread - more fuel flow equals LOWER EGT's. Fuel is a "coolant", if you will, and engines run hot when they run lean. In racing-speak - "lean is mean"...but you can melt important things like valves or pistons if you're too lean and too hot. Goose it and throw some more fuel at it, and it'll cool it off a bit.
I agree with all that you say...except that my belief is that "lean burns hot" is only related to gas engines.

EGT is directly related to piston velocity and BTUs released by the fuel. More fuel and lower RPMs create higher temps. When the fuel is burned on the power stroke, the longer the flame stays in the combustion chamber, the hotter it gets. Higher RPMs allow the hot gasses to leave quickly and fresh cold air to enter.

Higher RPMs also create more power at a lower torque so the work is done with less engine and transmission stress.

The worst case scenario for high EGT is wide open throttle under a load that is too great to sustain while at a lower RPM (aka "Lugging"). Most automatics will downshift...but, as mentioned, the ECO programming could possibly delay or prevent downshifting long enough to experience very high EGTs. It only takes a second for EGT to rise, and damage can occur after 15 seconds. Metal parts begin to anneal and change properties (melt or weaken) with higher temps.

As has been mentioned, tow smart. Get an ODBII interface that reads EGT and drive within the limits by manually downshifting or slowing down if necessary. For our automatics, watch the trans temp on the EVIC as well.

Hopefully, the VM3.0 de-fuels itself on high EGT but until someone tows heavy and confirms that it is impossible to hit high EGTs for extended periods, better safe than sorry!

BTW, all if this is standard stuff for the diesel towing and racing crowd. We are just now discussing it here. Its no big deal.
__________________
----------------------
The founder of JeepGarage.org, Scottina06, has a son Max who is in need of corrective surgery from an infection at birth that left one leg 4 inches short. We need to support our Jeep brothers. His family has started a fund on giveforward.com. If you have ever been helped by someone else, now is a good time to pay it forward. Here is a link to that page. God bless you! http://gfwd.at/1rz33PW
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ExcursionDiesel For This Useful Post:
  #41  
Old 04-16-2014, 02:18 AM
Futuresystem's Avatar
Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 40
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 311
Futuresystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

A few people are mentioning other vehicles which don't change in temp when they hit a hill.

There ain't no such animal. All you are seeing is a "dumbed down gauge", like on my wife's Hyundai i30 diesel.
Working hard, Aircon on, climbing a mountain range on a hot summer day, gauge sits half way.
Winter's day, descending the same range, gauge sits half way. Total baloney.
Many modern cars are like that, really no better than the old temp light cars once had.

A good friend's Landcruiser v8 diesel is like that- he was always boasting how the "Toyota has a proper cooling system", yet with an infra-red temp scanner I've proven the total outright lie which is the coolant temp gauge. Yes, he was shocked to see the real truth, after we towed up the Toowoomba range. I got him to pull over and pop the bonnet, and hey, guess what, the coolant temp was about 112 degrees Celsius, (233 F), not the story the gauge was telling!
Anyway, that's why we have pressurised cooling systems and high tech coolants, to raise the boiling point.

At least on our JGC diesels, we have a gauge which seems to tell the truth.

Has anybody had one actually overheat?
Not that I know of yet.

Mine is only brand new, no towing yet, but will certainly be watching it with interest rather than alarm!

Cya



Sent from my iPad using JeepGarage
__________________
If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. The quickest way out of a job, is by getting stuck into it!

2014 build white WK2 CRD 3.0 ECB 'roo Bar.
We HAVE our new Jeep, and love it!
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Futuresystem For This Useful Post:
  #42  
Old 04-16-2014, 11:39 AM
ExcursionDiesel's Avatar
Premium Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: W. TN.
Posts: 1,564
Thanks: 4
Thanked 221 Times in 149 Posts
Rep Power: 2935
ExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond reputeExcursionDiesel has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

^^^^ That is the best explanation yet. Thanks!
__________________
----------------------
The founder of JeepGarage.org, Scottina06, has a son Max who is in need of corrective surgery from an infection at birth that left one leg 4 inches short. We need to support our Jeep brothers. His family has started a fund on giveforward.com. If you have ever been helped by someone else, now is a good time to pay it forward. Here is a link to that page. God bless you! http://gfwd.at/1rz33PW
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 04-22-2014, 10:05 PM
talltale's Avatar
Member
My Jeep: 1947 2.4L CJ
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 101
Thanks: 12
Thanked 14 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 509
talltale is on a distinguished road
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

I just completed another trip (see my post #28 this thread) and thought I'd share my experiences/results:

Sandpoint, ID to Las Vegas via Hwy200 and 93 (lots of winding roads, hills, mountain passes, etc..) with some city driving in Vegas
- no trailer, OAT 30-70 F, speed 70-75 mph when possible
- 1292 miles, 46.2 gal DSL, avg. mpg 28.0
- ECO mode on, Transmission Oil Temp mostly 195, Engine Oil mostly 203

Las Vegas to Sandpoint via the same route in reverse
- with 6600 lb Airstream in tow, speed 60 mph when possible
- 925 miles, 56.6 gal DSL, avg. mpg 16.3
-ECO mode off, Trans Oil Temp max 199, Engine Oil Temp max 256

The highest pass I went over was 7800 Ft. On grades I spent a lot of time in 7th gear, less time in 6th, and the steepest grades were in 5th gear at 45 mph. I've towed the Airstream over the same route with my 2004 Duramax and averaged 12 mpg with a minimum speed of 55 mph for comparison.
__________________
Ordered 8/12. Production Scheduled 8/15. Produced 9/28. Delivered 11/25. Overland 4x4 CRD, Deep Cherry Red/Brown Light Frost, ORA-II, Adv Tech.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to talltale For This Useful Post:
  #44  
Old 05-06-2014, 05:50 AM
Member
My Jeep: 2013 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Sydney N.S.W. Australia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 183
Blackadder785 is on a distinguished road
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

I have just read this thread with interest. I have a MY14 diesel Grand Cherokee, and have towed a 20ft van with it twice in the time I've had it. Both times it got well into the fourth quarter of the temp gauge when pulling up long hills. The interesting thing is that the first time was on a 30C day, while the second was only 16C.
I wondered whether the cooling fans don't come on until the engine temperature reaches the level indicated in the fourth quarter.
Anyway, a number of contributors have said that they were going to check with dealers, or were waiting on a response from Chrysler on this matter but no-one has reported back yet. Has anyone received any clarification regarding the high temperatures?
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #45  
Old 05-07-2014, 10:06 PM
Futuresystem's Avatar
Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 40
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 311
Futuresystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

G'day again from down under!

All done and dusted, caravan packed, wiring finished and windows tinted, and off we went.

Update after our first 500 klms of towing.....
The Van was packed to the gunnels with both consumables and non- consumables, including four full water tanks, would have tipped the scales at right on 3 Tonnes. I'm VERY happy I stuck to my guns and fitted the P3 brake controller on the dash, you can have the dealer offered rubbish (in Oz anyway), not in the same league as the P3 brake controller.

One word: Brilliant. This vehicle is just amazing, couldn't be happier (though am now wondering whether I should have held out for QL going by various people's comments. Having said that, I can't fault the ride of the steel springs, and there is less to go wrong!)
I'm over the moon with power, economy, comfort, just can't fault the damn thing.

A few observations:
Temperature. I had the mini iPad going the whole time, switching between maps and "Dash Command" hooked up to the OBDII via WiFi.
The engine runs at 97C ( 207F) on the flat, with the gauge right in the middle. These engines run HOT- and are designed to do so- it all helps with economy. (The thermostat is not even fully open at that temperature!) On the longest hard uphill slog we've done so far, the analogue gauge is very active, and moves quickly to about 3/4 with the Dash Command App saying 107 Celsius (225F), a loooong way from worrying temps, though of course it is not summer. It's nice to see an analogue gauge which actually tells the truth, unlike most modern vehicles, which lie through their teeth on the gauge till just before you have a serious problem!
(Might as well just have a light!)
Engine Oil temp varied from about 102 C (215F) to a maximum on the hill of 115 C (239F) or something like that- again, not even close to an issue!

The ZF 8 speed transmission is bloody brilliant- I found that 99% of the time "Drive" worked a treat, and on just a few very rare occasions, I reverted to manual- though then found it easy to forget to go back to drive. Transmission temp was very steady, with not even a hint of running hot up hills. It lived in the early to mid 90's C the whole time. I just love this car!!
Fuel economy is as expected, fantastic. All towing, I'm sitting on about 13.4 Litres per 100kilometres (17.5 miles per US gallon) doing mostly around 95- 100kph, which would be easy to better on a flat highway and even more so if I backed off to more like 90. One complaint: I'm finding it very easy to speed in this thing, it's so damn quiet, and so much effortless torque, it just wants to GO!

Further observations re the voltage issues some are worried about: it sits at about 14v when the battery is a bit discharged, then drops back to about 13.1v as soon as it senses the battery is full. Bear that in mind WRT charging a second battery, and have an appropriate DC-DC charger which will work with that. There is nothing wrong with your alternator when it drops the voltage like that.

I'm trying really hard to fault this thing, but no luck so far!
My only niggles are the foot park brake, (still don't like it) and maybe the capless fuel filler, which I feel could be an issue in allowing dust in when you poke the nozzle in to fill. I'd much prefer a fuel cap.

However, despite those, Love that Jeep.
Cya
__________________
If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. The quickest way out of a job, is by getting stuck into it!

2014 build white WK2 CRD 3.0 ECB 'roo Bar.
We HAVE our new Jeep, and love it!
Reply With Quote
  #46  
Old 05-08-2014, 02:34 AM
Member
My Jeep: 2013 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Sydney N.S.W. Australia
Posts: 33
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 183
Blackadder785 is on a distinguished road
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

Thanks Futuresystem. I too love my Jeep, but I have to say that the engine temperature issue does concern me.
The figures you quote and say are a long way from worrying seem pretty hot for a diesel engine, and I don't pretend to be an expert with diesels, but I've read that heat destroys them faster than petrol engines.
Have you got some data from Jeep to confirm your analysis?
Not questioning your credentials, but I am eager to feel secure to keep on going when I see that needle climbing up towards the red.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #47  
Old 05-09-2014, 09:15 PM
Futuresystem's Avatar
Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 40
Thanks: 0
Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 311
Futuresystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond reputeFuturesystem has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

Quote:
Thanks Futuresystem. I too love my Jeep, but I have to say that the engine temperature issue does concern me.
The figures you quote and say are a long way from worrying seem pretty hot for a diesel engine, and I don't pretend to be an expert with diesels, but I've read that heat destroys them faster than petrol engines.
Have you got some data from Jeep to confirm your analysis?
Not questioning your credentials, but I am eager to feel secure to keep on going when I see that needle climbing up towards the red.
My advice would be don't sweat on it, unless your gauge hits the top red section. The thermostat doesn't even open fully till much later than earlier generation engines, and as I say these engines are designed to run much hotter than engines of the past. It's to do with fuel economy and they would run them even hotter if they could, for the same reason.

If you were towing with a Toyota for example (or many other makes), you wouldn't know how hot the engine is running because they dumb down the gauge- it just doesn't move till the engine gets close to critical temps, even though the engine temp is rising, which is very common practice these days. My bet is Jeep will do the same eventually because they will get sick of people saying "my engine runs hot every time I hit a hill."
As I said in my earlier post, my engine coolant ran between 97 and 107C, which is waaaay below the boiling point of a pressurised cooling system with 50% OAT coolant.
Likewise the oil temp, just not an issue with modern high tech synthetic oils. These oils are a whole new ball game compared to the mineral oils we all used to use. They could run those temps all day every day, without any adverse effects.

Obviously I will be watching it closely on the iPad connected to the OBDII port in hotter weather when towing, but at this point I am not even the slightest bit concerned. Temps I've seen so far will NOT harm the engine in any way.

Cheers
David (by iPad)
__________________
If a job is worth doing, it's worth doing well. The quickest way out of a job, is by getting stuck into it!

2014 build white WK2 CRD 3.0 ECB 'roo Bar.
We HAVE our new Jeep, and love it!
Reply With Quote
  #48  
Old 05-14-2014, 11:22 PM
Member
My Jeep: 2014 3.0L WK2
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 27
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 278
Emersonjeep has a reputation beyond reputeEmersonjeep has a reputation beyond reputeEmersonjeep has a reputation beyond reputeEmersonjeep has a reputation beyond reputeEmersonjeep has a reputation beyond repute
Re: Towing Review//Engine Heat

I am pleased to report that I found a way to manage the engine heat on long mountain pass inclines when pulling a trailer. We tow a 21 foot TT weighing maybe 4500 lbs fully loaded. Last week we crossed Loveland Pass (via the Eisenhower tunnel) and the Vail pass west of Denver (both about 11,000 feet). I became alarmed when the heat guage needle almost touched the red zone as we neared the top of the passes, although both times we made it over without actually overheating and with apparently no after effects. We just returned from Colorado via the Wolf Creek Pass (10,800 feet), argued by some to be much more challenging than Loveland and Vail. I recalled that I had charged up the Loveland and Vail passes at rpm levels approaching and sometimes exceeding 3000, so coming over Wolf Creek Pass, I was careful on the incline (7% to 8% for nearly 8 miles) to keep the rpms at about 2000. The engine had ample power at that level (I believe it achieves maximum torque in that range), and just cruised along between 35 and 45 mph. The oil temperature maxed out at 244 degrees and held there, and the needle on the heat guage stopped and held at the halfway mark in the third section of the guage. The engine felt like it could have climbed for an hour at that rpm level, and we comfortably reached the summit. On the way down, the engine braking function worked beautifully with the paddle shifters-- no white nuckles at all. We have towed for 2800 miles on this trip, through mountains, into fierce headwinds, etc. and achieved about 16 mpg.
__________________

__________________
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Emersonjeep For This Useful Post:
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Towing - High Engine Oil Temps xcntrk Trouble Shooting/Problems/Service 14 07-21-2014 05:40 PM
2014 JGC Towing Review w/Pictures and Stats Willx Tech Tips/DIY/How To 30 06-10-2014 05:02 PM
2014 v6 Overland Towing Review Supertech30 Grand Cherokee - WK2 - 2 08-05-2013 06:10 PM
Towing questions. First time towing looking for some input. JTS97Z28 Grand Cherokee - WK2 - 5 08-25-2012 03:53 PM
V6 engine light on while towing? Overland-North Trouble Shooting/Problems/Service 6 03-26-2012 05:20 PM

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2012 - JeepGarage.Org
The Jeep Grand Cherokee Owners Community