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Old 08-07-2013, 07:42 AM
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Good automotive schools in MA?

Does anyone know of any good automotive schools or classes in MA?

I want to weigh out the best schooling option for the best price..

Certificates vs degrees?

What degree or certificate is typically earned and which of either is the best to retain?

Also, I have an Associates of Applied Science already from Le Cordon Bleu...
Do 2 of the same associates degrees = something else? Or will I just be stuck with 2 associates degrees in the same thing?... Lol

I have requested info from UTI, PCI and MTTI so far..
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Old 08-07-2013, 02:59 PM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

NOT any technical training schools, UTI, Wyotech and similar... They cost HUGE money and don't really have anything that local community colleges can offer for MUCH less. Ive seen 3 wyotech graduates at the dealer, 2 of them were working the express lube, one of them was something like 45k in the hole.

At a community college you would get an AAS like you already have. Personally to me, I would think an employer would appreciate a degree or 2 over a certificate ANY day. A certificate indicates you know the subject matter... enough to pass some tests... a degree indicates you have a general knowledge including the subject matter. Being a tech, I wouldn't want to hire someone who I don't want talking to a customer because their vocabulary makes them sound like they are 4 years old.

I did the Chrysler CAP program at my local community college... You graduate with an AAS and on the job training, and a relationship with your employer. When a dealer hires you on through the apprenticeship its because they want you after your done... all the other technical schools cannot say the same.

There are downsides to the industry... that you should know about, and I will share them, but my lunch hour is just ending. Ill follow up tonight.
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Old 08-07-2013, 11:53 PM
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Originally Posted by 2005JGC View Post
NOT any technical training schools, UTI, Wyotech and similar... They cost HUGE money and don't really have anything that local community colleges can offer for MUCH less. Ive seen 3 wyotech graduates at the dealer, 2 of them were working the express lube, one of them was something like 45k in the hole.

At a community college you would get an AAS like you already have. Personally to me, I would think an employer would appreciate a degree or 2 over a certificate ANY day. A certificate indicates you know the subject matter... enough to pass some tests... a degree indicates you have a general knowledge including the subject matter. Being a tech, I wouldn't want to hire someone who I don't want talking to a customer because their vocabulary makes them sound like they are 4 years old.

I did the Chrysler CAP program at my local community college... You graduate with an AAS and on the job training, and a relationship with your employer. When a dealer hires you on through the apprenticeship its because they want you after your done... all the other technical schools cannot say the same.

There are downsides to the industry... that you should know about, and I will share them, but my lunch hour is just ending. Ill follow up tonight.
PLEASE TELL ME THE DOWNSIDES!!
But keep in mind that I was a friggin line cook and banquet cook for 10 years, hovering over a grill with tickets spitting out at and listening to chefs scream at others as well as me all shift long.. And I was frequently promoted..

BUT its a completely different industry and I want the dirt on it!!

I applied to PCI today.. Theyre obviously going to approve me because;
A) they sized me for uniforms
B) they had me fill out financial aid forms
C) they dont have enough students on their brand new campus, I gathered

LET ME KNOW!!!
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Old 08-08-2013, 08:19 AM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

I'm going to jump in on this even though I'm not a mechanic and I know very little about the industry today.

If I saw a resume for an auto tech job from someone with a degree from le Cordon Bleau, I would likely give them an interview just out of curiosity. I don't know if you can walk into a lube tech job without training or experience, but it seems possible to me. When I've gone to a high-volume dealership I've seen lube techs sitting in training sessions led by a service writer.

Out of all the options here, I would try knocking on doors first. Get somebody in the service department to talk to you about the opportunities. I gotta believe if you're willing to work hard and cheaply, somebody will give you a try based on a positive attitude.

As previously said, you really need to weigh the debt burden from ANY training program--this is assuming the training is current and on-point. So I would look into the CC programs, if training is your ONLY path forward. But I would try knocking on doors first.
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Old 08-08-2013, 08:23 AM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

Just to be clear, I'm not suggesting that Lube Tech is your final career goal, I'm saying it looks like a great way to learn about the biz while getting paid for it.
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Old 08-08-2013, 03:00 PM
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Sorry, I forgot to follow up last night, ill try to remember tonight.

Havin Said that, I did want to state that MOST lube techs are people that know how to work a screw driver and loosen drain plugs... Anything you saw with a service writer "teaching" it was NOT technical training. Many service writer are just as clueless as the customers.
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Old 08-08-2013, 05:09 PM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

In California, we have Regional Occupational centers/programs that have classes for this kind of thing. They're low cost/free for the local residents.

You may want to look at this site from the state: Private Occupational School Students - Massachusetts Private Occupational Schools

It talks about Occupational Schools in MA, I didn't find anything on public ones.
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Old 08-08-2013, 06:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johngreen1234 View Post
I'm going to jump in on this even though I'm not a mechanic and I know very little about the industry today.

If I saw a resume for an auto tech job from someone with a degree from le Cordon Bleau, I would likely give them an interview just out of curiosity. I don't know if you can walk into a lube tech job without training or experience, but it seems possible to me. When I've gone to a high-volume dealership I've seen lube techs sitting in training sessions led by a service writer.

Out of all the options here, I would try knocking on doors first. Get somebody in the service department to talk to you about the opportunities. I gotta believe if you're willing to work hard and cheaply, somebody will give you a try based on a positive attitude.

As previously said, you really need to weigh the debt burden from ANY training program--this is assuming the training is current and on-point. So I would look into the CC programs, if training is your ONLY path forward. But I would try knocking on doors first.
Thanks for the advice!!
Yeah, Ive been talking to my mechanic friend who has 20 years under his belt and is a highly paid mechanic for muzi ford.. Ive so talked to another mechanic friend of mine and im getting advice from this forum..
It seems to be that UTI is not an option..
Im considering PCI because its 1/2 the tuition, much more hands on and it has all kinds of other perks..
I think if my resume has an associates in applied science from LBC as an honor student, plus my certificate as a certified ServSafe food+alcohol Instructor/proctor, + a certification from PCI and then head forward to taking all 8 tests to eventually become a "master mechanic", that should prove that im not afraid to get my hands dirty, im serious about safety and that im not a dolt lol..
I also think if i get a part time job at autozone or jiffy lube (preferably the junkyard.. Im talking to them) while im in school, it will show that im trying to gain experience..
What do you think?
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Old 08-08-2013, 06:17 PM
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Originally Posted by johngreen1234 View Post
Just to be clear, I'm not suggesting that Lube Tech is your final career goal, I'm saying it looks like a great way to learn about the biz while getting paid for it.
Def!!
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Old 08-08-2013, 06:58 PM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

I assume PCI is porter chester.

They don't have a horrible rep amongst the people in the manufacturing world that I work with.

As much as I'd like to add an awesome auto mechanic to the fold, have you looked at other mechanical-ish things?

If you have some mechanical aptitude, I'd look into machining, manufacturing, etc.. a lot of that stuff is moving back onshore, and if you end up being good at what you do it is probably a pretty good place to be.

I spend a growing portion of my time with clients doing manufacturing here in western Massachusetts (who woulda thunk?) .. I think there is momentum there, and if you are good at what you do I think it is a field to look into. (and if you aren't interested in being good at what you do, then it doesn't much matter what you do..)

If Le Cordon Bleu did what they say they do in the TV ads, then you understand the concept of "being good at what you do" ..

just bloviating..
...tom
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Old 08-08-2013, 07:23 PM
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I assume PCI is porter chester.

They don't have a horrible rep amongst the people in the manufacturing world that I work with.

As much as I'd like to add an awesome auto mechanic to the fold, have you looked at other mechanical-ish things?

If you have some mechanical aptitude, I'd look into machining, manufacturing, etc.. a lot of that stuff is moving back onshore, and if you end up being good at what you do it is probably a pretty good place to be.

I spend a growing portion of my time with clients doing manufacturing here in western Massachusetts (who woulda thunk?) .. I think there is momentum there, and if you are good at what you do I think it is a field to look into. (and if you aren't interested in being good at what you do, then it doesn't much matter what you do..)

If Le Cordon Bleu did what they say they do in the TV ads, then you understand the concept of "being good at what you do" ..

just bloviating..
...tom
Thanks Tom!
Yes, porter chester..
Ive considered becoming an electrician for a long time in life, but only really because ive heard they make good $$...
Pci was trying to show me their electrician program as well as their HVAC refrigeration/AC training, but I really have my heart set on auto-mechanics..
LCB commercials and Ads are a total joke! Haha.
I laugh every time i see them.. It really only enhanced my knowledge a little but from just learning basic techniques and better cooking methods...
Luckily i was in the biz for 8 years before i enrolled, totaling 10 years in the biz, because they pretty much teach you NOTHING about how it really is. They dont even explain about starting entry level on the line being a fry cook or pantry cook or how friggin long it takes to even become a supervisor or lead cook...
Anyways, i literally had to explain to the admissions rep that i want to be a mechanic and i will learn basic electricity and refrigeration skills in the auto program anyways (wiring/AC)..
You have to consider that they try to fill in the gaps in programs that arent full enough, so obvs he tried to do a lot of convincing until he saw that i was getting aggressive about the fact that im not interested in that. I think he was a little scared and also impressed that i have an open mind, but i also dont listen to bullshit...
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Old 08-08-2013, 08:55 PM
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Re: Good automotive schools in MA?

Ok here is some of the great things about the industry.

-You get to pay for your own tools to fix other peoples cars. Between boxes and tools I have probably 25-35k in tools and storage and I am just scratching the surface. When a tool breaks, I get to pay to have it fixed or replace it (or obviously repair it myself).

- The pay is NOT what your friend makes... PERIOD! There are some super techs, I think there were 2 that were right near or just above 6 figures at the dealer I worked for, and it was because they were assholes that stole all the good work and were too "busy" to do the crap everyone else was stuck doing... That or they flushed every fluid from every car that they touched needed or not. Generally people that are actually good techs get railroaded because they are handed the crappy nightmare cars to figure out because billy isn't smart enough to do it but for some reason he makes more than you by the end of the year. There are some people that land in the perfect environment with an employer that respects their ability and pays as such but typically... ESPECIALLY in a dealer, where the owner who is usually in bed with sales and couldn't give two craps if service needs adjustments to look out for the smart techs that are keeping his service department alive. Having said that, I will say it is also not impossible to make a living, there were some that were pulling 60-65k.

- Some customers think your a lying, cheating, thieving douche bag because their car broke and its going to cost a lot to fix. The check engine lamp comes on 2 weeks after a repair and they are in the front office SCREAMING that we didn't fix it when its a different failure, different code and different system of the car entirely.

- Some customers know more than you, Thanks to the Google and forums, and their own "knowledge" they know your lying, or your diagnosis is not correct.

- True story, a guy came in with a commander one day with a horrible brake pulsation, I measured all the rotors and all had thickness variation that required them to be machined to repair his concern... if your familiar with the ebrake on the WK/XK it uses shoes in the hat of the rear rotors... this guy just about burst an artery screaming and yelling at the adviser, saying we were just stealing from him, and that he pulled up on the ebrake and knew the rear brakes didn't need to be machined because there was no pulsation using the ebrake... sorry asshat, but two COMPLETELY separate systems and areas of the rotor, but come get your car because I don't want to touch it anyway.

- Benefits SUCK, which can basically be said for many/most private sector jobs. SOME employers are amazing but those that really take care of their employees KEEP their employees so its difficult to get a job there.

- Flat rate... you have a guy in the office putting numbers together and talking to customers, a guy who couldn't point out where the battery is under a hood. But whatever his magic fingers find on the computer is what you get paid, right or wrong. Any time there is an abnormal job, a broken bolt, or rust issues, you should be paid more to cover the additional time but at least where I have worked it is like pulling teeth to get this additional pay, between the writer not being comfortable asking, to the customer who doesn't want to pay a penny more than the quoted cost.

Yes, this is horribly one sided, I have worked for 2 shops of which neither really took care of its techs so I am a little callous. Is this the way the entire industry is... not completely, but you WILL deal with some of these.

I have a neighbor who needs a ride to get his vehicle from his mechanic so no proof reading or editing... sorry... Feel free to ask if you have any questions.
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