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-   -   Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration (http://www.jeepgarage.org/f109/michelins-latitude-tire-discoloration-27365.html)

AquaForester 08-20-2011 10:00 AM

Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Does anyone know what causes this discoloration or is it a defect? And no it's not dirt.

http://i236.photobucket.com/albums/f...u/IMG_7428.jpg

Red G8R 08-20-2011 10:07 AM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Could it be a stain? Doesn't look like a defect.

AAAA 08-20-2011 12:03 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Looks like you might have rubbed up against a granite curb. Don't know where you live, but here in upstate NY they are popular for an upscale look to the neighborhood. Some granite has more iron in it than others. Also some contractors do not grind down the sharp edge of the curb and many of us have cut our sidewalls parking. (Been there!).

12167jeep 08-20-2011 03:39 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
I
Quote:

Originally Posted by AAAA (Post 469672)
Looks like you might have rubbed up against a granite curb. Don't know where you live, but here in upstate NY they are popular for an upscale look to the neighborhood. Some granite has more iron in it than others. Also some contractors do not grind down the sharp edge of the curb and many of us have cut our sidewalls parking. (Been there!).

I agree, some curbs(older) have the metal edges. Mine looks like that from a BRUSHLESS drive through carwash. Rubbed on those metal guide rails

JETLIFE 08-20-2011 04:27 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
It's called "blooming"

Here's a little write up I found

Most people don't give a lot of thought to their tires except for how they look. Truth be known, your tires are designed to perform under extreme conditions of heat via kinetic energy transfer, high speeds for long periods of time and incredible forces of torque and flexing. That's a lot to ask from a chunk of rubber, inflated with air like a cream filled donut.

The science behind the modern rubber formulas used by major tire manufactures today is both complex and interesting. The rubber itself contains and ingredient called Antiozonant.

Antiozonant is an ingredient that helps to prevent the exterior rubber surface from cracking, checking, oxidizing, and deteriorating. The rubber is designed in such a way as to constantly work its way to the outside of the tire and as such, continually replenish the exterior surface with fresh antiozonant.

After the antiozonant works its way to the outside of the tire and is exposed to the ozone in the air, it turns brown. The technical term for this effect is blooming.

This is why you see a brown film on the surface your tires. You can wash your tires with soap or an all-purpose cleaner and remove this film, but in a few weeks, it's back. That's because the antiozonant continually works its way to the outside of the tires every time you drive your car.

Thus before applying a dressing you really need to do a thorough job of cleaning the outer surface of the tire to remove any spent antiozonants as well as any previously applied dressing and this will prepare the rubber to accept a fresh application of tire dressing.

AquaForester 08-20-2011 05:19 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by .moneen. (Post 469778)
It's called "blooming"

Here's a little write up I found

Most people don't give a lot of thought to their tires except for how they look. Truth be known, your tires are designed to perform under extreme conditions of heat via kinetic energy transfer, high speeds for long periods of time and incredible forces of torque and flexing. That's a lot to ask from a chunk of rubber, inflated with air like a cream filled donut.

The science behind the modern rubber formulas used by major tire manufactures today is both complex and interesting. The rubber itself contains and ingredient called Antiozonant.

Antiozonant is an ingredient that helps to prevent the exterior rubber surface from cracking, checking, oxidizing, and deteriorating. The rubber is designed in such a way as to constantly work its way to the outside of the tire and as such, continually replenish the exterior surface with fresh antiozonant.

After the antiozonant works its way to the outside of the tire and is exposed to the ozone in the air, it turns brown. The technical term for this effect is blooming.

This is why you see a brown film on the surface your tires. You can wash your tires with soap or an all-purpose cleaner and remove this film, but in a few weeks, it's back. That's because the antiozonant continually works its way to the outside of the tires every time you drive your car.

Thus before applying a dressing you really need to do a thorough job of cleaning the outer surface of the tire to remove any spent antiozonants as well as any previously applied dressing and this will prepare the rubber to accept a fresh application of tire dressing.

Wow, that's really interesting. Thanks for all that detailed info. I don't think I rubbed up against anything since the places that are Brown look too fluid.

ENFORCER 08-20-2011 05:42 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
I have seen it many times on my tyres and just thought it was rusty water staining it. Thanks for the education on what it really is.

Crestwood1001 08-20-2011 05:49 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Best way to clean it off is Bleach White. Spray it on a dry tire, let it sit for about 1 minute, spray on another light layer and scrub with a stiff wet brush. When you rinse it off you will have a clean black tire thats ready for tire shine. Just be sure to rinse it off very well with a strong stream of water because it can damage the finish on rims.

jeep2011 08-20-2011 08:37 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Happened to my latitudes when I rubbed the curbs and those were all concrete curbs. Grease lighting will take it off as well as tire shine.

AAAA 08-20-2011 10:19 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by .moneen. (Post 469778)
It's called "blooming"

Here's a little write up I found

Most people don't give a lot of thought to their tires except for how they look. Truth be known, your tires are designed to perform under extreme conditions of heat via kinetic energy transfer, high speeds for long periods of time and incredible forces of torque and flexing. That's a lot to ask from a chunk of rubber, inflated with air like a cream filled donut.

The science behind the modern rubber formulas used by major tire manufactures today is both complex and interesting. The rubber itself contains and ingredient called Antiozonant.

Antiozonant is an ingredient that helps to prevent the exterior rubber surface from cracking, checking, oxidizing, and deteriorating. The rubber is designed in such a way as to constantly work its way to the outside of the tire and as such, continually replenish the exterior surface with fresh antiozonant.









After the antiozonant works its way to the outside of the tire and is exposed to the ozone in the air, it turns brown. The technical term for this effect is blooming.

This is why you see a brown film on the surface your tires. You can wash your tires with soap or an all-purpose cleaner and remove this film, but in a few weeks, it's back. That's because the antiozonant continually works its way to the outside of the tires every time you drive your car.

Thus before applying a dressing you really need to do a thorough job of cleaning the outer surface of the tire to remove any spent antiozonants as well as any previously applied dressing and this will prepare the rubber to accept a fresh application of tire dressing.

Interesting, but I'm not driving around town and seeing brown tires.:confused:

JETLIFE 08-20-2011 10:27 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AAAA (Post 469975)
Interesting, but I'm not driving around town and seeing brown tires.:confused:

Well... Then you're not looking hard enough. Because it happens to every tire produced in the past 75 years.

here is an example of blooming. It doesn't mean the whole tire will be brown. But there will be areas with a brown-ish hue.

http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h6.../Blooming1.jpg

JETLIFE 08-20-2011 10:29 PM

Re: Michelins Latitude Tire Discoloration
 
Also the black plastic on many of our vehicles have a similar type of additive that constantly pushes itself to the surface, It does this to keep it shiny and black, and to prevent cracking and sun damage. that is also the reason why when people paint those types of plastics it usually chips/flakes off, because it's literally being pushed off by the additive moving to the surface. Good prep can solve that though.


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