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My bought new GC had an exhaust burn off issue from the get go.....take it into dealer and they 'burn off' the buildup in the DPF .....now that its off warranty they want insane money to do that. My independant mechanic has shown me the carbon buildup from the EGR tube and into the intake manifold.....its unbelievable....diesel intakes were not designed to burn off secondary exhaust and all the extra plumbing they put on this engine simply does not work. So people do diesel delete and in fact the chrysler dealer told me, on the qt, to do just that. Chrysler needs its feet held to the fire over these engines and i see a recall over coolant backing up into the engine which is related to this carbon buildup problem. Would appreciate any comments if you have had similar experiences.
 

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First post, welcome to the forum.

All these engines have excessive carbon deposits in the intake manifold due to a very dirty stock combustion cycle. Many will throw a code for the swirl valves between 100k and 150k because the valves no longer move due to carbon buildup. This requires the intake manifold be replaced.

There are two answers. Stage 1 tune early in the engines life to prevent the buildup, or a stage 2 tune later to remove the DPF and tune out the swirl valves.

If I were you, I'd delete the DPF and enjoy the Jeep for a long time to come.
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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Hi Bounty Hunter, what you describe doesn't sound pleasant to me -- I'm at 91K with my 2016, have kept it stock, and so sometime in the next 50-60K I should expect a problem with the swirl valves being clogged by the carbon buildup? I sure as hell hope not, but I also fear it might happen. When I bought my CRD, I was (and still am?) hoping to keep it for many hundreds of thousands of miles. I might have to adjust my long-term plan, meaning that my JGC CRD might only be a temporary girlfriend and not the 'til death do us part wife that I thought I was marrying when I bought her.

I'm not bailing just yet, mind you, but my confidence is getting shaken some more. And that includes the fact that I started with a 2014 JGC CRD and ended up having Jeep do a lemon law buy back on it. That's when I got the 2016.

I hope this isn't a 'fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me' situation. Because when this JGC CRD works, it's a great all-around rig.
 

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My bought new GC had an exhaust burn off issue from the get go.....take it into dealer and they 'burn off' the buildup in the DPF .....now that its off warranty they want insane money to do that. My independant mechanic has shown me the carbon buildup from the EGR tube and into the intake manifold.....its unbelievable....diesel intakes were not designed to burn off secondary exhaust and all the extra plumbing they put on this engine simply does not work. So people do diesel delete and in fact the chrysler dealer told me, on the qt, to do just that. Chrysler needs its feet held to the fire over these engines and i see a recall over coolant backing up into the engine which is related to this carbon buildup problem. Would appreciate any comments if you have had similar experiences.
What is Diesel Delete? Do any decarbonization products DIY or Commercial work?
 

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What is Diesel Delete? Do any decarbonization products DIY or Commercial work?
you remove the emissions equipment and get a tune that allows it to run that way. No more def , dpf, etc
 
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Here is my Intake manifold, 65,000 miles. If you want your engine to last, you need to delete/block off the EGR at a bare minimum, and a stage 1 tune. The Emissions control systems on these Ecodiesels are laughable. Note that in the 2018 model, the EGR exhaust tube is fed from after the DPF, so Chrysler knew it was a failure. Really the only good way to fix the carbon build up in the intake manifold, is to replace it.


225004
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
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DY78, that is downright nasty.
 

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DY78, that is downright nasty.
Yup, and everyone else's is just as bad. No one should reasonably expect long life out of something that functions this way. IMHO, a full delete and tune is really the only way to makes these Ecodiesels last and run properly. I have since installed Water/methanol injection as well to keep the EGT's under control and to help reduce NOx.
 

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Here is my Intake manifold, 65,000 miles. If you want your engine to last, you need to delete/block off the EGR at a bare minimum, and a stage 1 tune. The Emissions control systems on these Ecodiesels are laughable. Note that in the 2018 model, the EGR exhaust tube is fed from after the DPF, so Chrysler knew it was a failure. Really the only good way to fix the carbon build up in the intake manifold, is to replace it.
I didn't think post-DPF EGR was introduced until the '20 Gen 3 Ecodiesel.
 

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Hi Bounty Hunter, what you describe doesn't sound pleasant to me -- I'm at 91K with my 2016, have kept it stock, and so sometime in the next 50-60K I should expect a problem with the swirl valves being clogged by the carbon buildup? I sure as hell hope not, but I also fear it might happen. When I bought my CRD, I was (and still am?) hoping to keep it for many hundreds of thousands of miles. I might have to adjust my long-term plan, meaning that my JGC CRD might only be a temporary girlfriend and not the 'til death do us part wife that I thought I was marrying when I bought her.
My Eco is a long-term commitment, which is why I tuned with 457mi on the odometer.
 

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who is doing a tune that will disable egr/ dpf/ def? I barely missed the boat with getting a gde hot tune in September. I work on tractors for a living and really the only problems we have with these newer diesels is all related to the after-treament systems
 

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I didn't think post-DPF EGR was introduced until the '20 Gen 3 Ecodiesel.
How much of a difference in the above condition could be expected by using post DPF EGR piping?
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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you remove the emissions equipment and get a tune that allows it to run that way. No more def , dpf, etc
Well I’m in California and my 2016 JGC CRD is due for a smog inspection. So I can’t remove the emissions.
 

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Funny how California was the birthplace of the Hotrod, and now it is the Death place the Hotrod. If you want to modify your vehicle, California makes it basically impossible
 

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Just curious here. How can you do a "Diesel Delete" tune, and still get the thing through emissions once you remove the DEF system? There is no way you'll get it to run as clean out the tailpipe.
 

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Yo
Just curious here. How can you do a "Diesel Delete" tune, and still get the thing through emissions once you remove the DEF system? There is no way you'll get it to run as clean out the tailpipe.
You cant. Those of us that are fully deleted live in an area that has no diesel emissions. Or, you reinstall the DPF, SCR, DEF injector, EGR, sensors, as well as flash back to the OEM tune to pass emissions, then swap everything back over. You need to have a tuner that uses a handheld device so you can switch the tunes, or have another PCM with the AEM file on it for emissions. Unfortunately these Ecodiesels were designed to fail in stock form, so you either cheat the system, or pretty much count on an early death. These engines really are great, it is the US EPA crap that kills them and gives everyone so many problems.
 

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I really wanted to buy a diesel when we purchased our 2015 Grand Cherokee, but just couldn't justify it. The fuel savings in the long run just weren't enough. Not to mention they wouldn't give a Lifetime Maxcare Warranty with the Eco Diesel, like they offered with the 5.7 HEMI. I keep my vehicles for a long time, and 7 years on a very complex, expensive engine is nowhere near enough. Especially with as little as we drive. (We're both retired). And one of the many reasons people tend to go diesel in the first place, is they are noted for long engine life.... Or at least used to be.

They bit off too much too quickly trying to make these diesels run cleaner. Excessive plumbing, adding complex, expensive DEF systems and such. And now the consumers are paying the price for it, with a multitude of expensive to repair problems and issues. That really isn't fair. And the government should start to realize they cannot legislate technology. This is what happens when they try to. Paying thousands of dollars extra for a diesel engine that becomes choked with carbon, in just 65,000 miles is simply preposterous. Especially when you have gas engines offered in the same vehicles that can go 100,000 miles before you even have to change the spark plugs or engine coolant.
 

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My bought new GC had an exhaust burn off issue from the get go.....take it into dealer and they 'burn off' the buildup in the DPF .....now that its off warranty they want insane money to do that. My independant mechanic has shown me the carbon buildup from the EGR tube and into the intake manifold.....its unbelievable....diesel intakes were not designed to burn off secondary exhaust and all the extra plumbing they put on this engine simply does not work. So people do diesel delete and in fact the chrysler dealer told me, on the qt, to do just that. Chrysler needs its feet held to the fire over these engines and i see a recall over coolant backing up into the engine which is related to this carbon buildup problem. Would appreciate any comments if you have had similar experiences.
Please describe the type of driving you do. Is it mostly travelling to and from work in city traffic. Or are there parts of your journey when you can travel at 40 to 55 miles per hour for about 15 to 20 minutes. The last is better for a Diesel engine. Being Eco diesel is no different. Diesel engines do not like long stop and move traffic at low speeds with periods of idling, at traffic lights etc.

The best thing you can do is once a fortnight take the your vehicle for a 30 to 40 minute high speed drive on a highway or freeway. This gets all the internals of your exhaust very hot which burns of the carbon build up, especially in your catalytic converter. The other issue is to make sure you do not let your car idle to warm up before driving off. Start it. Give it a couple of minutes and then move off, not over revving the engine till it warms up properly
 

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In my opinion, The extreme diesel emissions regulations in the US should only apply to medium and heavy duty applications. Only about 2% of light duty passenger vehicles registered in the US are diesel.
 
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