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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just replaced my battery in my 2014 Grand Cherokee. The posts on the brand new battery are apparently a bit smaller than the battery I just removed. (will solve that tomorrow with battery post shims). However, in wrestling with the post clamp trying (unsuccessfully) to tighten the too big clamps on the too small posts, I broke a connection on the negative cable. Its a two -wire (about 18 ga) red wire/white wire pair that attaches to a module attached to the cable end. Photo of broken cable connection:

234703



Can anyone tell precisely what this connection is and suggest how to best repair/replace it?
 

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It’s a battery sensor. 56029713AA is the part number for it which has been superceeded by 56029713AD. Looks like it’s around $80-$90 plus shipping from Jeep dealers online. Could be more or less at your local dealer.

There are some cheaper ones on eBay - one in particular looks like an aftermarket for $37 and free shipping. Could be fine and could be junk...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks - precisely what does the sensor do - and what problems might I incur driving without it connected? (Gotta wait for new sensor).
 

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I think the sensor primarily monitors battery temperature to make sure it’s not overheating since it’s inside the vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It’s a battery sensor. 56029713AA is the part number for it which has been superceeded by 56029713AD. Looks like it’s around $80-$90 plus shipping from Jeep dealers online. Could be more or less at your local dealer.

There are some cheaper ones on eBay - one in particular looks like an aftermarket for $37 and free shipping. Could be fine and could be junk...
It’s a battery sensor. 56029713AA is the part number for it which has been superceeded by 56029713AD. Looks like it’s around $80-$90 plus shipping from Jeep dealers online. Could be more or less at your local dealer.

There are some cheaper ones on eBay - one in particular looks like an aftermarket for $37 and free shipping. Could be fine and could be junk...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My local dealer had one in stock - for the bargain price of $120. Found others cheaper online, but I needed it now, he had it now. Done deal. All installed. Seat back over battery.
 

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For completeness:

"The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) serves to record and process measured battery variable values (current, voltage, temperature) for the vehicle power net management system. The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) will calculate the Battery 'state of charge', 'state of health', and 'state of function'. "
 

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For completeness:

"The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) serves to record and process measured battery variable values (current, voltage, temperature) for the vehicle power net management system. The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) will calculate the Battery 'state of charge', 'state of health', and 'state of function'. "
Its for the ESS (start/stop) system, when you get the "ESS disabled Battery Charging" message, its from the info from that sensor. Disconnecting it should disable the ESS.
My 2011 doesn't have it, cause it doesn't have ESS.
I've disconnected it on my daughters 2019 Chrysler Pacifica, and it disabled the ESS, of course you also get the warning on the dash. There are multiple how to videos on youtube showing you how to disconnect that sensor on numerous FCA models to disable ESS.

Which begs the question, O.P. is your ESS disabled?
hmmm - then what happens if it's too hot?
The PCM reduces charging voltage, and increases charging voltage if its cold.

There is usually a battery temp sensor that is a black plastic bulb somewhere near the battery, for most cars produced in the last quarter century. Yours might be combined into that unit. I don't remember seeing the temp sensor when I changed my battery, but I'm sure there is something that accounts for temperature when setting charging voltage. Although, if you read the POO in the FSM, the charging system uses PWM to smart charge the battery, sounds likes in null periods its sensing and reading voltage and resistances, so maybe they got around reading a temp sensor for setting charging parameters.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Is my ESS disabled? Don’t know. Not sure what evidence I’d have one way or another. I ran car for a day (today and yesterday) without my ESS cable being connected. Saw no difference in car's operation or messages on dashboard with it connected or without it connected. The ESS cable is now reconnected, car operating just as it was.
The only feedback I had was that after I put new battery in the info gauge on the dash noted the battery was putting out a bit above 14 V. Before the new battery, it was putting out only about 8 V.
 

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Hmm, I wouldn't call it an ESS cable, it provided detailed battery info that the ESS uses as well as other systems, but its supposed to disable the ESS if you disconnect it, since it doesn't have the detailed battery info from that sensor. That should light an Amber "A" light, that looks like the Avengers symbol when its disabled. I haven't tried it on a WK2, but other FCA vehicles it disables the system with that warning lamp lit while its disabled.
 

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it has been a while since I replaced the battery in my '14 5.7L (no ESS), but I believe it had that module.
 

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it has been a while since I replaced the battery in my '14 5.7L (no ESS), but I believe it had that module.
I could see that, because its likely used for more than ESS, its may be more a technology development for better charging system control. So I may have been a little pre-mature sayings it for the ESS. I had the O.P. calling it an ESS cable for the wires to it.

The fact it disables the ESS if you disconnect was what I was trying to point out. And perhaps for the WK2 it doesn't disable the ESS, the O.P. said he did not get the warning lamp for a disabled ESS when it was broken.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I could see that, because its likely used for more than ESS, its may be more a technology development for better charging system control. So I may have been a little pre-mature sayings it for the ESS. I had the O.P. calling it an ESS cable for the wires to it.

The fact it disables the ESS if you disconnect was what I was trying to point out. And perhaps for the WK2 it doesn't disable the ESS, the O.P. said he did not get the warning lamp for a disabled ESS when it was broken.
As far as I can tell, my car was born before the ESS generation and
does not, nor did it ever, have an auto start/stop system. Thank God.
 

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Just replaced my battery in my 2014 Grand Cherokee. The posts on the brand new battery are apparently a bit smaller than the battery I just removed. (will solve that tomorrow with battery post shims). However, in wrestling with the post clamp trying (unsuccessfully) to tighten the too big clamps on the too small posts, I broke a connection on the negative cable. Its a two -wire (about 18 ga) red wire/white wire pair that attaches to a module attached to the cable end. Photo of broken cable connection:

View attachment 234703


Can anyone tell precisely what this connection is and suggest how to best repair/replace it?
Be prepared to bring your Cherokee into the shop for a reset of your car computer. Many of your basic functions won't be working. Auto start, climate control and others.
 

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Be prepared to bring your Cherokee into the shop for a reset of your car computer. Many of your basic functions won't be working. Auto start, climate control and others.
Hmmm, that shouldn't happen, and didn't happen when I replaced the battery on my 2011. Sounds like a communication problem between modules, needing a reconfiguration. A simple reset of the PCM was done when you disconnected the battery to replace it. Which module (computer) had to be reset? Cause the WK2 only has a dozen different ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
As far as I can tell, everything works just fine… auto start, climate control, radio settings, navigation, etc., etc. all work just peachy. And the battery was out a couple of times for ½ hour to one hour.
 

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For completeness:

"The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) serves to record and process measured battery variable values (current, voltage, temperature) for the vehicle power net management system. The Intelligent Battery Sensor (IBS) will calculate the Battery 'state of charge', 'state of health', and 'state of function'. "
I believe it incorporates an ammeter shunt to probably monitor the charging current entering the battery and the load current leaving the battery.
 

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Charliepapa- What brand battery did you put in that had an undersized neg post? That should never happen if you put in the exact same battery size category as the factory battery. Unless you have a diesel I think the battery is a Group 94R. My '14 Summit ecodiesel was the larger Group 49 and when the OE battery in my current hemi eventually dies I'll replace it with a larger Group 49.

So if you purchased a group 94R then the battery posts should be standardized. If it was me, I'd go back to the store that sold it to me and check other 94R batteries for the correct post size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I put in a Duralast Platinum AGM battery H7 - AGM Group Size 94R purchased from my local Autozone.

The new battery sensor, attached to a clamp for the negative terminal battery, clamped on the terminal fine with no shim required. The existing clamp for the positive post clamped on sufficiently tight when the new battery went in. So in the end I didn't use any shims. The only thing I can think of is that the old positive clamp expanded due to heat over time.

No problem with the new sensor clamp on the negative terminal. Clamped tight. Not sure why I couldn't tighten down the old clamps to the new battery if it weren't the post sizes being different - except as mentioned just above, maybe the clamps themselves had expanded. But no amount of force and tweaking was going to make the old negative terminal clamp fit tightly to the new battery. But - problem solved with new clamp on battery sensor clamp.
 
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