Jeep Garage  - Jeep Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone thought about or have gone back to 5W30 after a ECM tune? Why or why not?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wondered since the tune will remove most of the soot going into engine. I thought they moved to 5W40 for this reason alone. But I agree, 5W40 is probably the safer bet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
I actually received a CEL for "low oil viscosity" shortly after having the shifter update done last year. I had 30 weight in the engine at the time. I assumed it was due to Jeep changing the oil weight and reprogrammed the ECU. I now run 40 weight w/ a GDE tune without codes to date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
I actually received a CEL for "low oil viscosity" shortly after having the shifter update done last year. I had 30 weight in the engine at the time. I assumed it was due to Jeep changing the oil weight and reprogrammed the ECU. I now run 40 weight w/ a GDE tune without codes to date.
Are you talking straight weight or the recommended 5W's?
 

·
Registered
17 Sub OB/17 Ridge
Joined
·
1,110 Posts
I used the Pennzoil spec'ed oil which to be honest is superior in every way to the Rotella if you look at things like flash point and shear. This oil change (62xxx miles) I switch to Rotella because of price and how big a PITA it is for me to get the Pennzoil (I have to order it no place stocks it).
I used regular dino Rotella for 179K miles on my Super Duty but was required to change oil every 5K miles and that was 15 quarts.
Never an issue so my switch should be fine.

I like others thing FCA did this because of availability and cost. My guess is the the Ram 1500 guys have all gone to Rotella Synthetic....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,393 Posts
If you don't think it's quite as good as the Pennzoil, just knock your changes down to 8K miles. No harm done and Rotella T6 is a lot cheaper....
 

·
Registered
17 Sub OB/17 Ridge
Joined
·
1,110 Posts
Changed at 8300 miles. Once once in a while do I let it run to 10K miles but did oil analysis a couple times posted the results and the oil life was excellent meaning TBN and all metals...
As cheap as Rotella is I plan to keep a 8000-8500 OCI...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
Changed at 8300 miles. Once once in a while do I let it run to 10K miles but did oil analysis a couple times posted the results and the oil life was excellent meaning TBN and all metals...
As cheap as Rotella is I plan to keep a 8000-8500 OCI...
I do mine at 6,500 now that I switched to Rotella and I agree the Pennzoil was a much better oil than this Rotella T6. I always send in a sample to Blackstone and they think I could go longer between changes, but stick to 6,500 due to the extreme cold weather climate here in America's deep freeze. To me the oil is cheap compared to any mechanical problems one could have with this little motor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
The main theory on most of the EcoDiesel engine failures is excessive rod/crank bearing clearances. Higher viscosity oil provides more protection and oil pressure. Will it prevent your bottom from letting go prematurely, who knows...but I would stick with the 5-40w.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
The main theory on most of the EcoDiesel engine failures is excessive rod/crank bearing clearances. Higher viscosity oil provides more protection and oil pressure. Will it prevent your bottom from letting go prematurely, who knows...but I would stick with the 5-40w.
So the 5w40 is AKA just a band-aid? My original oil choice when I purchased this vehicle was 15W40, but followed FCA instructions and went 5w30 and then switched to 5w40 after the bulletin. If I purchased this vehicle new today, I would most likely start first oil change with a very high quality 15w40 compatible with DPF exhaust systems like they use in the big rigs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Yup bandaid, at least that is the theory, FAC hasn't been providing any info. There is like a 100 page thread on the topic in one of the Dodge Ram forums. Some of the failures are caused by the timing gear slipping on the cam because its not keyed, but the majority are crank and rod bearings. The cam thing may also be related to lack of oil pressure who knows...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,016 Posts
Yup bandaid, at least that is the theory, FAC hasn't been providing any info. There is like a 100 page thread on the topic in one of the Dodge Ram forums. Some of the failures are caused by the timing gear slipping on the cam because its not keyed, but the majority are crank and rod bearings. The cam thing may also be related to lack of oil pressure who knows...
All of the above issues should be non issues by the year 2014 since they've been building diesel engines since way back when? Why would any builder not key lock a critical component like a cam gear? Huh? One slip and what could possibly happen to the engine? Do we need to be asking these questions when we go to the dealer to purchase new vehicles? Are the cam gears locked so they can't slip, are the bearings built to hold together under normal everyday driving conditions, will the EGR destroy the engine, I can go on and on. I don't want to rant, I just want common sense with these educated engineers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
383 Posts
But we'll save $0.35 per car built by not keying the timing gears, the failure rates will be low and we'll find something to deny their warranty anyway, so we will save one miiiiillion dollars.

:: strokes handlebar moustache ::
 

·
Registered
2015 WK2 EcoDiesel
Joined
·
24 Posts
Apologies for the hijack, but instead of making a whole different thread for a similar question:

I just got the GDE Hot Tune, so I have my EGR (electronically) deleted. For now, I'm still running the recommended Shell Rotella T6 5W-40.

I plan on fully deleting with an Off Road tune and a turbo-back exhaust in the future. Once the DPF is gone, is there any reason to continue using the recommended 5W-40 oil, or can I switch to the proven 15W-40? I've always been a fan of Royal Purple, so I'd like to run their oil if possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
All of the above issues should be non issues by the year 2014 since they've been building diesel engines since way back when? Why would any builder not key lock a critical component like a cam gear? Huh? One slip and what could possibly happen to the engine? Do we need to be asking these questions when we go to the dealer to purchase new vehicles? Are the cam gears locked so they can't slip, are the bearings built to hold together under normal everyday driving conditions, will the EGR destroy the engine, I can go on and on. I don't want to rant, I just want common sense with these educated engineers.
The 15s and 16s are still blowing up, and the oil weight change applies to the 16s so they never got it handled. It doesn't make sense to me either. I have a 16 and it sometime feels like I'm driving a time bomb. When I was a dealer tech at BMW in 05' all the M3s got new rod bearings because they were setup too tight and throw rods and spinning bearings.
 

·
Registered
2015 WK2 EcoDiesel
Joined
·
24 Posts
The manufacture specifies specific oil ratings, in our case its FCA Material Standard MS-10902 and API CJ-4 specifications. It also depends on climate, will you be starting the vehicle when its -20 degress, 15-40w might not be a great idea. This explains it pretty well: https://www.oildepot.ca/5w-40-motor-oil-now-suggested-all-ecodiesel-engines/
Thanks for that reference. I'll check it out.

I just figured that their reasoning for oil viscosity was related to emissions. Since I plan on doing away with all of those pesky parts, I thought perhaps bumping up to 15W-40 (and an oil that I trust/have run on every single one of my vehicles) may add an extra layer of protection on the cold side against those main bearing failures that the article references. I'm certainly not an expert though, so I could be completely mistaken.

As far as temperatures, I've lived in the south for the past 6 years and have not seen temperatures below 0F since then. Not even below +5F, as far as I can recall. Referencing the attached chart I found doing a quick google search, I should be good as far as that goes.

Temperature and emissions aside, I just wasn't sure if there'd be any benefit to making the switch for our particular engines. I know the needs of the 3.0L are completely different than the full size or big rig engines, but I also know that manufacturer recommended oil brands/weights are oftentimes more based on price/politics than what is actually good for the engine.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top