Jeep Garage  - Jeep Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ordered the 6Monkeys onboard air mount a few weeks ago, and finally got around to installing it today. With the mount, I also ordered the Air Aux mount plate, which is for mounting a quick disconnect and a pressure gauge inside the trunk area. I actually asked Daniel to cut an extra hole for me, so I can mount a switch for the air compressor.
Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive exterior

Watch Automotive lighting Wood Automotive tire Gas


For the air compressor, I opted to go with the Vixen Horns 3 gallon kit, since that is what 6Monkeys modeled the mount after. I didn't want to run into any headaches for mounting location, so I just bought the same air compress and tank. The compressor and tank is perfectly at home on the 6Monkeys mount. The air hose is a tad bit close to the exhaust, but I just zip tied it to the car side of the exhaust hanger, I don't imagine it would be any issues.

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive design Automotive lighting Asphalt

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread

Motor vehicle Automotive tire Light Vehicle Tire



As far as plumbing the setup, I created a Y underneath the aux mount plate, so I only need to run 1 hose from the air tank into the cabin. I cut up 2 of the Harbor Freight 5 ft 3/8" air hose (rated for 200 psi), and attached brass barb fittings with hose clamps. I have no doubt that the barb will hold well beyond the 200 psi that the rubber hose itself is rated for. The Harbor Freight air hose also have a angled/swivel end, which helps angle the hose away from the exhaust a bit more.

Hand Bicycle part Bicycle fork Electrical wiring Musical instrument


Light Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Vehicle


The air hose exits the cabin through a hole in the trunk floor. There is a plastic plug over the hole, and I just popped it up, cut off about half of the plug, route the hose and wiring through, and the pushed the half plug back in to seal up the hole as much as possible. I then cut up the carpet mat just enough to create a hole for the hose and wire, so the mat gets laid back down flat. I do plan to get some silicon sealant to further seal that hole, but the weather was getting a bit too hot (92 and blazing sun), so I decided to save that for another day. With the way the hose is routed, the plastic tub can go back on with no modifications, shows a VERY VERY slight bulge, but is barely noticeable without the corner bins (next to the spare tire) in place. Once the corner bins are in, there is no way anyone could tell anything was different.
Vehicle Hood Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive exterior

Automotive tire Hood Tire Automotive design Motor vehicle


As far as the electrical, since the Vixen Horns compressor is rated for 23 amps, and the 7 pin trailer harness 12+ is rated for 30 amps, I decided to just tap into that. I bought a 7 pin to 4 pin Tee harness. This has the added benefit of having a 4 pin connector, that I can potentially use for the license plate light if/when I get a permanent tire carrier and have to move the license plate. I know wiring it like this means the relay harness is always getting power (the 7 pin trailer 12+ is constant hot). But the alternative is to run a power wire to the battery. I ran my idea by [email protected], and he recommend that I add a switch to the harness, so it is not constantly on, which would have the potential of draining the battery if there is a leak in the air system. From that tee harness, I found the 12+ wire, tapped into that with a 3 way connector, ran a generic relayed harness, but swapped out the switch for something I like better. I also switched out the air pressure switch that is included in the Vixen Horns kit. The air pressure switch they included is a 170-200 psi (shut off at 200 psi, turn on if pressure is below 170). All of the components in the Vixen Horns kit are rated for 200psi, and that got me a tad bit concerned. I spoke with Vixen Horns about this topic, and was assured that the components have enough margin that it wouldn't be an issue. I also spoke with [email protected] about this topic, and he is actually running an air pressure regulator @ 110psi (so all the hoses, other than from the compressor to the air tank, would only see 110psi), so he kept the 170-200 from the kit. In the end, I decided to buy a 120-150 air pressure switch since the hoses I am using are only rated for 200, and I didn't want to bump up against that on a regular basis. With the harnesses connected together, the electrical portion becomes plug and play. I did have to cut off a bit of the excess wires from that generic relayed harness, but since I wasn't using their connectors, it really didn't matter. The only portion that have excessive slack is to the light switch. Since I still wanted to use their connectors, I didn't want to shorter the wire just to reconnect them to the same ends. I just zip tied the excessive wire and tucked it below the air aux plate, there is plenty of room underneath.

Overall, I am extremely happy with the outcome. I now have onboard air, with no luggage/storage room taken away. In fact, there is enough room on the side of the compressor mount that I can possibly strap a toolbox to it, and keep my air hose and chucks there. I may explore that another day when the weather is less harsh

Office equipment Gas Machine Auto part Cylinder
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
This is very cool! I installed my on-board air inside, but it sure would be nice to free up that cargo space. How do you like the compressor? 1.7cfm is a little on the low side, I opted for a 5.6cfm compressor myself (and find it still doesn't quite keep up all the way when filling my tires). I like the idea of having the pressure switch on the tank, I've got mine in the compressor (before the check valve) and I'm thinking I should probably relocate it to my tank as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is very cool! I installed my on-board air inside, but it sure would be nice to free up that cargo space. How do you like the compressor? 1.7cfm is a little on the low side, I opted for a 5.6cfm compressor myself (and find it still doesn't quite keep up all the way when filling my tires). I like the idea of having the pressure switch on the tank, I've got mine in the compressor (before the check valve) and I'm thinking I should probably relocate it to my tank as well.
The flow rate is indeed on the low side. But since the compressor is mounted outside of the cabin, my plan is to hit the switch after airing down, and let the compressor do its thing as I start going down the trail. That way it'd be ready when I exit the trail and is ready to air back up. I haven't really tested it out, but I am hoping the 3 gallon tank at 150 PSI gets me most of the way back highway pressures. What is your experience with your system?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
The flow rate is indeed on the low side. But since the compressor is mounted outside of the cabin, my plan is to hit the switch after airing down, and let the compressor do its thing as I start going down the trail. That way it'd be ready when I exit the trail and is ready to air back up. I haven't really tested it out, but I am hoping the 3 gallon tank at 150 PSI gets me most of the way back highway pressures. What is your experience with your system?
Well, my tank is only 2 gallons at 120psi, so it holds a bit less air than yours - but my experience has been that it's only enough to do about 1 tire, maybe 2 if I only went to 30psi instead of 40. I'd try it out at home before you hit the trail, you'll probably be ok but just be aware the last 2 tires might take a lot longer than the first 2.

Your pump should fill your tank in about 10 minutes or less, so you shouldn't need to turn it on as soon as you air down - I'd just turn it on maybe 10 minutes before you get back to the main road at the end of the day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, my tank is only 2 gallons at 120psi, so it holds a bit less air than yours - but my experience has been that it's only enough to do about 1 tire, maybe 2 if I only went to 30psi instead of 40. I'd try it out at home before you hit the trail, you'll probably be ok but just be aware the last 2 tires might take a lot longer than the first 2.

Your pump should fill your tank in about 10 minutes or less, so you shouldn't need to turn it on as soon as you air down - I'd just turn it on maybe 10 minutes before you get back to the main road at the end of the day.
That's good to know, thank you! I typically run my tires between 33 and 35, and it's still running the stock size right now. Maybe I'll look into adding a pancake tank to that empty space, bring the total volume up to 6-8 gallons @ 150. Based on the numbers you provided, that should have a much better chance of getting me back on the highway in 1 shot.

I did run the pump to see how long it takes to fill up the tank, and it was indeed around 10 minutes before the pressure switch shut the compressor off. I will experiment and see. Thank you very much for sharing your experience!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
That's good to know, thank you! I typically run my tires between 33 and 35, and it's still running the stock size right now. Maybe I'll look into adding a pancake tank to that empty space, bring the total volume up to 6-8 gallons @ 150. Based on the numbers you provided, that should have a much better chance of getting me back on the highway in 1 shot.

I did run the pump to see how long it takes to fill up the tank, and it was indeed around 10 minutes before the pressure switch shut the compressor off. I will experiment and see. Thank you very much for sharing your experience!!
No prob! You're going to love having on-board air, it really is a game changer. My favorite upgrade/addition I've done to date.

Before adding another air tank, you might want to look at just doing a different compressor instead. I went with a smittybilt 5.6cfm for mine, which fills my 2ga tank in about a minute, or maybe a little less. So in the time it takes me to disconnect the chuck from one tire, screw on the valve stem cap, go to the next tire and put the chuck on, the tank is already mostly full again, ready to fill the next tire. I do think I'd probably benefit from a 3ga tank like yours, though - I might look into that soon.

Also, check out Staun tire deflators if you haven't already! In my opinion, much faster and easier to use than the ARB rapid deflator. Individually, they're slower, but the fact that you do all 4 tires at once actually makes it faster (and you don't have to keep tabs on the pressure, it just stops automagically when it hits the set pressure). Skip the cheapy $30 chinese amazon ones, go for the actual Staun brand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the tip on the deflator! I'll for sure look into it.

I also looked at the price for an extra 200 psi air tank and/or the Smittybilt compressor. I can't convince myself to spend the $120-150 to save 10 minutes every 2-4 months (if even that). In case it hasn't been apparent, I am very new at this, and don't have very aggressive goals at this moment. I am sure what I already have is plenty to get me started.

As I gain more experience, I would have a better idea on what needs to be improved, and what else I would need. Thank you! Learning a lot from you guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Sounds good! Yep for infrequent use I think you're fine, I wouldn't suggest doing any changes until you've tried out what you've got for a while. I sometimes air down/up serveral times a month so I've overthought my setup for sure :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Had a chance to test out my system yesterday. With the tank @ 150psi, first tire takes maybe 5-8 seconds. Second tire takes 20. Third tire takes a minute, and fourth would take 5 minutes or so(or I get some water while waiting for tank pressure to build). Still very usable as is.

This is airing back up from 20 to 30 on my stock tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
Had a chance to test out my system yesterday. With the tank @ 150psi, first tire takes maybe 5-8 seconds. Second tire takes 20. Third tire takes a minute, and fourth would take 5 minutes or so(or I get some water while waiting for tank pressure to build). Still very usable as is.

This is airing back up from 20 to 30 on my stock tires.
Sweet! That's plenty fast, and 30psi is enough to get you back home. Beats the heck out of sitting around for an hour waiting for an overheating harbor freight pump to fill each tire! (I've been there). Enjoy the new air system!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yah, that'd 30 psi cold, so after driving on the highway, they raised to around 33 psi, exactly as what the car specified (I know there are varying experiences/conditions/preferences on this topic, so I will use published numbers as basis)

In any case, very happy with the system, and I was comfortably doing 40-50 mph on loose gravel/dirt road yesterday after airing down, while my friends in their crossovers crawled along at 8-10 mph. The dirt road was only 2 miles, and I was at the parking lot for a good 10 minutes before they finally pulled up.

Going back out, I was done airing back up, before they finally caught up to me. And that's only 2 miles!!!

THOROUGHLY impressed and happy with the Trailhawk!
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top