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I received my follow-up letter from FCA last week and called my dealer. None were in stock but my service advisor advised that he would order one for me from Montreal and call me when it came in. Two days later he called back to advise that the alternator had arrived and I have an appointment to have it installed.
 

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getting mine done now..I have lost track of how many recalls there have been. How many constitutes a "lemon"?
Recalls have no bearing on Lemon Laws for the most part, which are all state-specific.
 

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2012 GCO
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ChryCo sent me another notice on this. I replaced mine late 2016 after 107k miles and it stopped making electricity. Instead of calling them and waiting on hold I went online to correct their records and they sure don't make that easy. So instead I'm going to make a claim and have them pay me the $430 that I paid for the replacement (part only).

They don't make that easy either, and insist on seeing not just the receipt but a copy of the cancelled check. My bank at least has an online chat box, and it took a while but they are mailing me a copy. I still wasted time but wasn't on hold and at least have a chance to make it worth my while. :lol:
 

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2011 Dodge Durango
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Well I'm pretty miffed. I went in today to have mine done, low and behold, just like I was afraid would happen...they told me my alternator is the "updated" version (it's the original alternator guys) and that no replacement was necessary. OK if you say so...if this thing dies on me I'm going back and throwing the alternator through the f*cking window of the dealership.

I would REALLY, REALLY like to hear from an FCA tech or FCA themselves - someone, anyone who can tell me what sets my 2011 alternator apart from another "prone to failure" alternator. The service manager at my dealer had no idea, just said they check the part # and if it corresponds with certain numbers I don't get a new alternator.

I KNEW this would happen. Damn thing better last me another 40,000 miles or it's gonna be a projectile.
 

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Well I'm pretty miffed. I went in today to have mine done, low and behold, just like I was afraid would happen...they told me my alternator is the "updated" version (it's the original alternator guys) and that no replacement was necessary. OK if you say so...if this thing dies on me I'm going back and throwing the alternator through the f*cking window of the dealership.

I would REALLY, REALLY like to hear from an FCA tech or FCA themselves - someone, anyone who can tell me what sets my 2011 alternator apart from another "prone to failure" alternator. The service manager at my dealer had no idea, just said they check the part # and if it corresponds with certain numbers I don't get a new alternator.

I KNEW this would happen. Damn thing better last me another 40,000 miles or it's gonna be a projectile.
Yep.
Basically the same thing in my experience and my sentiments echo yours...

I raised hell with the service manager and he opened an inquiry with FCA because he wanted to be able to explain to other customers.

From what he explained, there is a specific 'batch' of serial numbers that are affected. Obviously my original alternator was one of the affected ones because it died (and took out the PCM in the process). The unit they used to repair my GC must not be in the 'bad batch' because I got the same 'song and dance' about it not being affected by the recall.

So my original alternator lasted just over 5 years... So hopefully this 'new' one lasts at least that long and then it won't be my problem any more. My plan is to keep this Jeep for 10 years and then buy something else.

At the rate FCA is screwing over customers.... It won't be another Jeep, which is a shame. The new Wrangler JL Rubicon is looking sweet.
 

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I'm a little perplexed here...if your vehicle's alternator ISN'T within the serial numbers that are affected by the issue, that sounds like a very good thing to me and you're not subject to the problem. Recalls are there to replace defective or resolve unsafe conditions. They aren't to mitigate normal wear and tear or risk from normal potential failure over time.
 

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2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit 3.6L 4x2
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I was informed by a Customer Cares rep, after I went to the FCA recall website and plugged in my VIN, that my Feb 14th 2014 build JGC with the 220amp alternator is NOT part of the recall. After the website informed me that my JGC was not part of the recall, I felt that I should contact FCA directly just to make sure. The rep (Brenda), plugged in my VIN and confirmed that our JGC was not part of the Alternator recall.

So...there you have it. It appears that just some alternators in the parts bin were defective and I just lucked out (HOPEFULLY)!!!!
 

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If FCA was able to identify a batch of potentially defective alternators (with various outputs (160 A or 220 A), as some forum members wrote here), it could be a defective component from a sub-supplier batch.
As (up to now) only 3.6 have their alternator covered, does it mean that alternator is different form engine type to another (could be too simple to have same alternator for different engines ...) ?


As philbytx, I have a 2014 CRD without alternator recall based on VIN, maybe they're not suffering THIS potential problem (yet ?).
 

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I'm a little perplexed here...if your vehicle's alternator ISN'T within the serial numbers that are affected by the issue, that sounds like a very good thing to me and you're not subject to the problem. Recalls are there to replace defective or resolve unsafe conditions. They aren't to mitigate normal wear and tear or risk from normal potential failure over time.
There's a simple answer to that - I don't trust them. I'd sooner assume that they are trying to save a buck by not including certain alternators than THEIR theory that magically, somehow, some of the alternators were built with different diodes than the others. Then, sooner or later, these "skipped" alternators will probably end up being subject to a second recall or some other such amended recall process. In the mean time, might I get stranded? Might my vehicle go dead in an intersection? On a busy highway? On a 10 degree night with my kids on board? All because FCA was overwhelmed by this recall and was just trying to cut corners and save money? I bought a vehicle with the lowest miles I could afford for a reason - to avoid stuff like that.

I'm not looking for a handout or a freebie from FCA. If the truck reaches 150,000 miles and I need to replace the alternator because it stops charging, fine. So be it. This is different. There are drastic consequences involved which result from the premature failure of a defective part, and I just don't buy that my alternator came off the line A-OK but the one behind it and the one in front of it didn't. Call me a conspiracy theorist if you must.

Why not just give EVERYONE with one of these vehicles a new alternator in the name of safety? Is that what took them this long to start fixing cars? Because they HAD to bean count and see who they could stiff out of a new alternator with some BS theory about how "nah you're fine that one isn't covered"? Since July 2017 while they were researching this, how MANY people got stranded? Had to pay for repairs? Tow trucks? Rentals? It's horrendous how they're handling this and it's going to turn even devoted customers to other brands.

This is all my opinion on the subject, I see your point of view Jim. Like I say, I don't expect a handout. Just, well, heaven help Fiat Chrysler Automobiles if it fails anytime soon in the manner in which these have been failing after having been given the "all clear" by the dealer as they wink-wink nudge-nudge each other.

As (up to now) only 3.6 have their alternator covered, does it mean that alternator is different form engine type to another (could be too simple to have same alternator for different engines ...) ?
Some Hemi equipped vehicles are include too, like Charger and Challengers. It seems to center on whether or not the vehicle has EHPS. And Hemi equipped WK2's and WD's don't, so I don't believe they're covered.
 

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I'm a little perplexed here...if your vehicle's alternator ISN'T within the serial numbers that are affected by the issue, that sounds like a very good thing to me and you're not subject to the problem. Recalls are there to replace defective or resolve unsafe conditions. They aren't to mitigate normal wear and tear or risk from normal potential failure over time.
And I'm a little perplexed also...

T36 recall announcement in July of 2017.
Keep getting a 'song and dance' about 'new alternator being developed' and that we 'have to wait for the new parts to be available'.

Meanwhile multiple people have had their alternator fail. In my case it's the 180amp version because I have the V6 with tow package.

Now I'm being told that the replacement alternator that my dealer pulled 'off their shelf' in September of 2017 is not affected by the recall, even though FCA kept claiming that we ALL had to wait for the NEW alternators.

AND THEN when I chat with FCA, after being told by the dealer that my alternator is no longer covered by the recall, I'm told by the FCA representative that my vehicle doesn't qualify for the recall because I don't have electro-hydraulic steering.

Say WHAT?
The rep in the chat had my VIN number...
I advised her that if my vehicle does not have electro-hydraulic steering then I sure would like to know that the big electric motor sitting on the sub-frame in front of the engine with power steering hoses coming out of it is for???? Needless to say I ended that chat and went out to the garage and took pictures of said electric motor and pump INCLUDING part number prominently displayed on the motor. I then did a search on the part numbers and gee, what do you know... I have electro-hydraulic steering.

So yeah... I am NOT willing to give FCA the benefit of the doubt. Nor do I trust them. As some one else has pointed out... It would appear that it was NOT an issue of parts being available, but that their 'bean counters' have been sifting through part numbers attempting to narrow down the scope of the recall the smallest number possible and I'm willing to bet that they will have made mistakes and some customers will be left stranded on the side of the road when their OEM or replacement alternator fails.
 

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If FCA was able to identify a batch of potentially defective alternators (with various outputs (160 A or 220 A), as some forum members wrote here), it could be a defective component from a sub-supplier batch.
As (up to now) only 3.6 have their alternator covered, does it mean that alternator is different form engine type to another (could be too simple to have same alternator for different engines ...) ?


As philbytx, I have a 2014 CRD without alternator recall based on VIN, maybe they're not suffering THIS potential problem (yet ?).
Diesels aren't subject to the recall, yet.

Here's the latest feedback from FCA in Australia:

I have spoken to our technical team, and below is what they have sent me

To answer these two questions as best as possible.

There are 2 main differences between the petrol and the diesel alternators is their design and operation. Although they both are rated at 220 amp they operate in different ways.

1. The voltage regulation is controlled in two completely different ways. The petrol is controlled by the PCM and the diesel has its own regulator which sends a signal to the PCM of what the alternator is charging at.

2. With the limited amount of failed diesel alternators we have seen by comparison to petrol alternators. None of the diesel alternator failures we have seen have resulted in a Thermal incident. And not all diesel alternator failures are related to the diode failing.

With the design of the diesel alternator, in the event of a diode failure, the driver will receive a warning on the dash, with a chime notifying them of an charging fault well before it has any effect on the vehicles operation.
The reports from diesel owners in Australia where the alternator has died is that they have not had any warning, they have simply lost power while driving. My guess is that FCA will eventually have to recall these.
 
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Diesels aren't subject to the recall, yet.
Thanks Benn0, I'm a little more confident with these FCA Australia informations.
My 2014 EcoDiesel (220A alternator with towing pacjage) has only 55k kilometers, and as Prospect62 wrote, I bought mine with low mileage (35k kilometers and 2 years old) to avoid parts aging ...
I had 2 recalls already, and suffer 2 other f.....g problems but I'm out of warranty now ... :mad:
 

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Summary: My 2012 WK2 3.6 137,000 km (85,000 miles) alternator failed, leaving me stranded. CAA and Chrysler took great care of me. I am happy with the outcome.

Detail: My wife and I were heading home at 10:00 pm on a Saturday evening. A minute or so after starting the Jeep, I received a battery warning light, followed by a strange sound from the engine. By this point, I had already suspected an alternator failure as I had received the recall notice sometime ago. I was able to pull over to a safe spot at a gas station and stopped the Jeep within 30 seconds. I could smell burning electrical wiring. I popped open the hood and was happy to see there was no fire, though I could still clearly smell burnt wiring. I called CAA (Canadian Automobile Association). Within a minute or two, all electrical functions had failed. No hazard flashers, lights, radio, etc.

CAA had a flat bead at our location within 30 minutes. The CAA worker used a portable battery to give the vehicle enough power to enable a switch from park into neutral. He then winched the vehicle onto his flatbed, deposited it at the local Chrysler Dodge Jeep dealer and drove us home. He was a gentleman and we gave him a healthy tip.

The dealer discovered the alternator had failed as well as the battery, saying the former was covered by the recall, but that I had to pay for the battery. I responded that I believe the battery failure was due to the alternator failure and that I was hoping that I would not have to pay for a battery replacement. I also requested that they inspect the accessory belt, as I suspect that the alternator locked up and that the belt may have been damaged by having to slide over a locked pulley. Again, I am not positive about this, but I asked them to check the belt anyway.
The dealer called back later to say that the PCM module had failed and that they will cover the alternator, battery, PCM and all associated labour costs. The PCM arrive the following day and was promptly repaired and returned to me. I am very happy how well that CAA and Chrysler took care of me.

I am fortunate too that this failure occurred close to me home. Being stranded close to home when it is only -5C is no big deal. It would have been a challenge if the failure occurred in the middle of nowhere, when truly cold. Having to spend a night or two in a hotel waiting for repairs would have been a more significant challenge.
 

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Summary: My 2012 WK2 3.6 137,000 km (85,000 miles) alternator failed, leaving me stranded. CAA and Chrysler took great care of me. I am happy with the outcome.

Detail: My wife and I were heading home at 10:00 pm on a Saturday evening. A minute or so after starting the Jeep, I received a battery warning light, followed by a strange sound from the engine. By this point, I had already suspected an alternator failure as I had received the recall notice sometime ago. I was able to pull over to a safe spot at a gas station and stopped the Jeep within 30 seconds. I could smell burning electrical wiring. I popped open the hood and was happy to see there was no fire, though I could still clearly smell burnt wiring. I called CAA (Canadian Automobile Association). Within a minute or two, all electrical functions had failed. No hazard flashers, lights, radio, etc.

CAA had a flat bead at our location within 30 minutes. The CAA worker used a portable battery to give the vehicle enough power to enable a switch from park into neutral. He then winched the vehicle onto his flatbed, deposited it at the local Chrysler Dodge Jeep dealer and drove us home. He was a gentleman and we gave him a healthy tip.

The dealer discovered the alternator had failed as well as the battery, saying the former was covered by the recall, but that I had to pay for the battery. I responded that I believe the battery failure was due to the alternator failure and that I was hoping that I would not have to pay for a battery replacement. I also requested that they inspect the accessory belt, as I suspect that the alternator locked up and that the belt may have been damaged by having to slide over a locked pulley. Again, I am not positive about this, but I asked them to check the belt anyway.
The dealer called back later to say that the PCM module had failed and that they will cover the alternator, battery, PCM and all associated labour costs. The PCM arrive the following day and was promptly repaired and returned to me. I am very happy how well that CAA and Chrysler took care of me.

I am fortunate too that this failure occurred close to me home. Being stranded close to home when it is only -5C is no big deal. It would have been a challenge if the failure occurred in the middle of nowhere, when truly cold. Having to spend a night or two in a hotel waiting for repairs would have been a more significant challenge.
literally the exact same thing happened to my wife. Fried the ECM and battery. With a little back and forth with Jeep and the dealer they covered everything with zero out of pocket for me for my 2012 with 90k miles roughly when it happened. Got a letter then later stating that my replacement alternator was clear and free from all recalls..So hopefully everything is good now.
 

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New here...I have a 2013 grand Cherokee, 56,000 miles. Car started making a whining sound, followed by burning smell this past weekend. Googled possible causes, found the T36 recall. Parked it until mechanic opened Monday. Monday morning on the way to mechanic, car lost power, all of the control panel lights were flashing, the burning smell was so strong I had to roll the windows down. I was able to pull over in a safe place to wait for a tow truck.

Towed to Jeep dealership, we explained that this was probably the T36 recall issue. They seemed skeptical. They didn’t know when they would be able to get to our car, might be a day or two. We explained that according to Chrysler’s dealer instructions, they should provide a loaner car. They managed to get to it before 5:00.

They said it was indeed the recalled alternator problem and they replaced it. However, they said the burning smell was not from the alternator but from a leak in the power steering rack. They will be happy to fix it for $1400.

Went to pick it up today, got on the interstate and the battery light came on. Took it back and they said I was one of very few that the PCM had been damaged by the alternator. They replaced that and everything seems ok so far.

However, we did not let them fix the power steering, but somehow the burning smell is no longer there!?! We have a 100,000 mile warranty through CarMax so we will be taking it to another dealership to have the power steering inspected.

I don’t doubt that something may be wrong with the power steering, but I find it insulting to say the burning smell was definitely not the alternator even though there have been so many owners who have reported a burning smell, smoke, and even fire with the faulty alternators. It seemed as though they wanted to scare us into paying for a really expensive repair by saying it was causing the burning smell.

I really like this car but I’m concerned about additional problems that may come as a result of the recalled alternator. Not to mention the possible power steering problem, seems like this is early in the mileage for that type of problem.
 

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Suppliers keep records of what they manufacture. They often manufacture in "Lots" of items.

There product starts failing, they investigate, if they find that one of the components is failing, like the Diodes, they investigate that. They find that diodes they got in a shipment, to many of them are defective and fail to early. They go through their records and conclude that the alternators they manufactured in lots X, Y and Z could have these defective diodes. They inform FCA.

So FCA, which also keeps records, issues a recall for the vehicles that they put alternators for lots X,Y and Z in them.

So what FCA is saying, Alternators with these serial numbers may have been manufactured with defective diodes. If your alternator doesn't fall within the list of affected serial numbers, then it was manufactured when the supplier didn't have a problem with defective diodes and therefore is not a bad alternator.

The Dealership personnel using the terms "updated" alternator was a mistake on his part, he should have said, your alternator's serial numbers shows it was NOT manufactured in the period when they had defective diodes, therefore its unaffected by this problem. Sadly many Dealerships, especially their service departments, don't put an emphasis on quality, the attitude, lack of knowledge and ability of the staff reflect that attitude. He may have mistakenly thought all problems are solved by an updated part, if the part isn't on the bad list it must be updated. He doesn't realize the problem could be a lot of bad alternators, and should be telling customers, your alternator is not one of from the lot of bad alternators.
 

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Some people mentioned getting the dealer to cover a replacement of the battery when the alternator failed.

Has anybody been able to get a battery replaced as part of the alternator recall if the alternator didn't actually fail?
 

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Some people mentioned getting the dealer to cover a replacement of the battery when the alternator failed.

Has anybody been able to get a battery replaced as part of the alternator recall if the alternator didn't actually fail?
I can't imagine that they would replace a battery that was good, and most of the alternator replacements were of working units. My battery was fine, but it was five years old, so I payed for a replacement when I had the recall done. Even with an AGM battery, five years is pretty long in the tooth, especially in my climate. And I believe those batteries that were replaced when alternators failed were damaged by the failure.
 

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Yea, I could imagine if the alternator failed with the Diodes shorting, it could damage the battery and whole lot of other stuff.

If you're getting the recall done before the alternator failed and there was no damage, I don't see how you can expect to receive a new battery.

If you're battery failed because of the alternator also failed, then you would get a new battery, I expect if the alternator failed in a way to kill your battery, you'd also have a lot of other damage as well, they would have to repair.

If your battery fails out of the bumper to bumper warranty, and the alternator caused no damage to the vehicle, whether it failed or was replaced before it failed, again, I don't see how you expect a new battery, unless it failed at the same time as the alternator and that was the only damage from the alternator failing....?
 
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