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After the monstable shifter debacle, the nhtsa insisted FCA make a software update to tell if the driver got out of the car when it was not shifted into park and then automatically shift it into park. This was when the WK2 didn't have an electric parking brake, that could be set by the computer.

One of the parameters the software looked for to tell if the driver got out of the car was if the seatbelt was unbuckled for the driver. There is a whole list of parameters, but they all come down to the car is running. Then the door opens and the drivers seatbelt is unbuckled and the software will shift into park, or set the parking brake on the M/Y with the brake the computer can activate.


Gotta' love it, when the car is in control of YOU, rather than YOU being able to control the CAR.....




Absolutely insane!!
 

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Gotta' love it, when the car is in control of YOU, rather than YOU being able to control the CAR.....
Kinda like being sixteen again ...
 

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The WK2 still doesn't have an electric parking brake, and never will. That will show up on the new WL.
Your right, I didn't think any of the WK2 had an electric parking brake, but guess maybe the latest models years did, because "I thought the O.P. said the Parking brake auto engaged". I went back, he said the "AutoPark".

It wouldn't be that hard to switch to the electric parking brake, but the Software Automatically shifting into park got the NHTSA and Media off FCA's back, so likely they figured it wasn't worth the money to do it before the next generation.
Gotta' love it, when the car is in control of YOU, rather than YOU being able to control the CAR.....
Absolutely insane!!
Complain to the NHTSA, Media and the General Public of Society that has turned into a Mob, with the Outrage Machine constantly pumping on all cylinders.......

Look up any online article about that Star Trek movie actor that ran himself over with his own JGC, then look at the comments posted underneath......

Look up the Police Report, the cops made a whole list of incredibly stupid mistakes the driver made, which you could tell from the Report the cops basically thought the guy was a total idiot.....

The monostable shifter was a debacle because it was just a bad shifter, it isn't any more dangerous than a driver is just plain stupid, lazy and ignorant.......

And that makes up about 90% of drivers today.......

And what is our Society's answer to that, well blame the car manufacturers and force them to make the car smarter than the driver.....

And the drivers just get more and more stupid..........
 

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Complain to the NHTSA, Media and the General Public of Society that has turned into a Mob, with the Outrage Machine constantly pumping on all cylinders.......

Look up any online article about that Star Trek movie actor that ran himself over with his own JGC, then look at the comments posted underneath......

Look up the Police Report, the cops made a whole list of incredibly stupid mistakes the driver made, which you could tell from the Report the cops basically thought the guy was a total idiot.....

The monostable shifter was a debacle because it was just a bad shifter, it isn't any more dangerous than a driver is just plain stupid, lazy and ignorant.......

And that makes up about 90% of drivers today.......

And what is our Society's answer to that, well blame the car manufacturers and force them to make the car smarter than the driver.....

And the drivers just get more and more stupid..........

I agree!!


Actually, I'm rather surprised that the GC has a foot operated e-brake. Maybe I'm missing something, but I've found that there are occasions when the e-brake is useful where traction is marginal, and a hand operated e-brake is easy to modulate.
 

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I agree!!


Actually, I'm rather surprised that the GC has a foot operated e-brake. Maybe I'm missing something, but I've found that there are occasions when the e-brake is useful where traction is marginal, and a hand operated e-brake is easy to modulate.
this what they created Brake lock differential the ABS pump controls individual calipers.

I Prefer the Floor E-brake Mechanical FTW.
 

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Huh. Given the agreed-upon fact that about 90% of drivers today are just plain stupid, lazy and ignorant ... you think it's a bad idea to design cars with that in mind? You think we'd get a better return on trying to make better drivers?
 

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Huh. Given the agreed-upon fact that about 90% of drivers today are just plain stupid, lazy and ignorant ... you think it's a bad idea to design cars with that in mind? You think we'd get a better return on trying to make better drivers?
I understand what you're saying, but that's more of a political discussion. Since this website tends to stay more on the topic of Jeeps, rather than politics, I'll leave it alone....
 

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I also prefer the hand brake. The drum-in-hat e-brake, being a drum brake, is self energizing, so an arm is enough to produce all the brake force necessary. The previous gen had a hand brake, not pedal.

True, the ESP is going to do anything you would legitimately do with a parking brake, and better. The ESP will fight you from doing stunts, which a parking brake can be used for, but stunts aren't exactly legitimate.

I suspect the foot brake was for luxury image, less intrusive, that's why they switched to it.

Electric Parking Brakes are the future, the Mob has spoken, drivers aren't expected to be competent, the car has to be smarter than the driver. An electric parking brake can be controlled by a computer and software, and be set when they should be, because your average negligent driver never once sets their parking brake.
 

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I also prefer the hand brake. The drum-in-hat e-brake, being a drum brake, is self energizing, so an arm is enough to produce all the brake force necessary. The previous gen had a hand brake, not pedal.

True, the ESP is going to do anything you would legitimately do with a parking brake, and better. The ESP will fight you from doing stunts, which a parking brake can be used for, but stunts aren't exactly legitimate.

I suspect the foot brake was for luxury image, less intrusive, that's why they switched to it.

Electric Parking Brakes are the future, the Mob has spoken, drivers aren't expected to be competent, the car has to be smarter than the driver. An electric parking brake can be controlled by a computer and software, and be set when they should be, because your average negligent driver never once sets their parking brake.
I suppose the umbrella handle ebrake is really the best in many ways (but looks ugly) but I like the foot operated ones that do NOT require you to push them down to release but which have a release handle. If you hold the release handle down during your emergency you can push and let up on the ebrake pedal just like the regular brake pedal. The JGC has the push down to release which makes it almost useless as a way to have a usable brake for a short trip home if your brakes were to go out.

The Electric Pbrake is even worse as it introduces yet another layer of possible failure modes and you can't modulate it at all, it's either on or off. Horrible idea.
 

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I just got a 2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited Luxury 2 Group. Tried taking it through a car wash and when I put it in neutral and the conveyer went to grab the wheel, the AutoPark engaged and locked the truck up to where it wouldn’t take. The message on the screen read “AutoPark Engaged Shift to P then Shift to Gear.” Anyone know a solution to this problem or a way I can deactivate the AutoPark temporarily before car washes? Thanks
To confirm, when you were sitting in the vehicle with it in neutral, you had your seatbelt connected and vehicle running?
 

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I suppose the umbrella handle ebrake is really the best in many ways (but looks ugly) but I like the foot operated ones that do NOT require you to push them down to release but which have a release handle. If you hold the release handle down during your emergency you can push and let up on the ebrake pedal just like the regular brake pedal. The JGC has the push down to release which makes it almost useless as a way to have a usable brake for a short trip home if your brakes were to go out.

The Electric Pbrake is even worse as it introduces yet another layer of possible failure modes and you can't modulate it at all, it's either on or off. Horrible idea.
You can hold the button in on the hand brake to do the same as you describe for a foot brake, and not have to drive hunched over holding the brake release lever. And I agree with the push-to-lock, push-again-to-unlock foot brake, convenient to get rid of the release lever, but a real drawback if you need to actually use the parking brake as an emergency brake.

Supposedly the electric parking brake recognizes the vehicle is moving, so if you hold the switch while moving, it will apply the electric brake in a way to slow and stop the vehicle. That might be a different mode, or it might just mean it applies the electric brake just the same, just the physics and design of the vehicle and brakes result in it slowing the vehicle and not locking up till you get toward low speed.
 

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I suppose the umbrella handle ebrake is really the best in many ways (but looks ugly) but I like the foot operated ones that do NOT require you to push them down to release but which have a release handle. If you hold the release handle down during your emergency you can push and let up on the ebrake pedal just like the regular brake pedal. The JGC has the push down to release which makes it almost useless as a way to have a usable brake for a short trip home if your brakes were to go out.

The Electric Pbrake is even worse as it introduces yet another layer of possible failure modes and you can't modulate it at all, it's either on or off. Horrible idea.
Good point...I had forgotten about that, especially the electric e-brake.
 

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Anyone have any experience with an electric parking brake? I get the impression it doesn't react right away, i.e. you pull the lever and even if the motor starts to pull the cable right away, the cable has enough slack it may be a 2 or 3 seconds before the brake is applied.

Again, the only real downside I see for that, you can't do stunts with your car no more, which really is not a legitimate complaint.

Being able to modulate the brake to be able to drive using the parking brake instead of the service brakes, illegal in most states, again how legitimate? The electric parking brake will stop you if your service brakes fail, then you get the car towed to be repaired.

Reliability? There are a lot of examples about going to a more complex system would assure less reliability, but after the new technology matured, it's more reliable than the old mechanical system. Look at Carburetors that were replaced by fuel injection, those first fuel injection systems were less reliable, but years ago, cars stopped having fuel delivery problems like they used to because the fuel injection was more reliable. Just try to find a can of ether for starting your car, very common in the days of Carburetors, you can't find them today, because they aren't needed. An electric parking brake removes a lot the cable and levers that can fail. But it still uses cables, and the biggest thing, an electric motor. Sure an electric motor "can" be very reliable, but they also can be very unreliable, depends on a lot of factors, not the least of which is if the manufacturer forces the supplier into cutting corners by demanding they drop the price, which the Domestic Manufacturer's always end up doing when they run into economic woes.

The real kicker for reliability, that no one seems to realize, are these safety interlocks the NHTSA, Gov, Media and the public keep insisting on. In the past, if you had a door switch fail, you'd get an annoying light that you could live with until you got a chance to troubleshoot and fix it. Today, you have a door switch fail, you likely can't drive the car because a safety interlock prevents the vehicle from shifting out of park because of the autopark safety interlock. (Actually I don't think the WK2 autopark will do that, but its an hypothetical example). Now you have to have the vehicle towed to a shop and pay them to troubleshoot it and fix it.
 

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Anyone have any experience with an electric parking brake? I get the impression it doesn't react right away, i.e. you pull the lever and even if the motor starts to pull the cable right away, the cable has enough slack it may be a 2 or 3 seconds before the brake is applied.
The one in our Outback seems to respond quickly enough. And it works better for my wife, who never seems to push the pedal down more than about halfway in the Jeep.
 

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...Again, the only real downside I see for that, you can't do stunts with your car no more, which really is not a legitimate complaint.



Reliability? There are a lot of examples about going to a more complex system would assure less reliability, but after the new technology matured, it's more reliable than the old mechanical system. Look at Carburetors that were replaced by fuel injection, those first fuel injection systems were less reliable, but years ago, cars stopped having fuel delivery problems like they used to because the fuel injection was more reliable. …... An electric parking brake removes a lot the cable and levers that can fail. But it still uses cables, and the biggest thing, an electric motor. Sure an electric motor "can" be very reliable, but they also can be very unreliable, depends on a lot of factors,

The real kicker for reliability, that no one seems to realize, are these safety interlocks the NHTSA, Gov, Media and the public keep insisting on..... Today, you have a door switch fail, you likely can't drive the car because a safety interlock prevents the vehicle from shifting out of park because of the autopark safety interlock.....Now you have to have the vehicle towed to a shop and pay them to troubleshoot it and fix it.


Sometimes, it's not a question of being able to do "stunts", as you phrase it, it's the ability to make an evasive move, to save your hide. I realize that this only happened to me once, and it was a long time ago, but....I was heading to work one Saturday. It had snowed overnight, and the roads still weren't completely plowed. Some guy wasn't careful, and backed out of his driveway, right into my path. I wasn't going all that quickly, but there's no way I could have stopped in time.


My brain flashed "bootleg turn", and I spun the steering wheel hard left and stood on the gas. It wasn't pretty, because you don't practice this stuff all the time, but I snapped my car around, and missed the gut by a few inches. With all of the "nanny controls" on the cars today, I could never had done it. Stunt? No. Survival? Yes...…..


With respect to reliability, let me say this...I live in the snow belt, where road salt is used with regularity, and nothing will destroy marginal components like 2-3 winters will. That's why I like basic mechanical systems. I agree that fuel injection works better, but carburetors, strictly from a functional standpoint, did a pretty good job for about 60 years.


And one more thing about reliability, as I'm taking a "road trip" in a couple of months. The absolute LAST thing I need, while either "out in the country", while driving on an Interstate expressway, or parked in a crowded hotel parking garage, is some $2.95 electronic part shutting me down. At least in the "old days", there weren't too many parts that would 100% incapacitate you, unlike today. You generally got a warning, as the older systems tended to "go away" gradually, giving you some warning.
 

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I just got a 2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited Luxury 2 Group. Tried taking it through a car wash and when I put it in neutral and the conveyer went to grab the wheel, the AutoPark engaged and locked the truck up to where it wouldn’t take. The message on the screen read “AutoPark Engaged Shift to P then Shift to Gear.” Anyone know a solution to this problem or a way I can deactivate the AutoPark temporarily before car washes? Thanks
 

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Ok guys auto park fix for jeep jl and it.
The drivers door if you unhook the door clip the auto park will be disable. Now if you remove the green and yellow wire on the gladiator and put the clip back in you will disable the auto park.
 

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I just got a 2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited Luxury 2 Group. Tried taking it through a car wash and when I put it in neutral and the conveyer went to grab the wheel, the AutoPark engaged and locked the truck up to where it wouldn’t take. The message on the screen read “AutoPark Engaged Shift to P then Shift to Gear.” Anyone know a solution to this problem or a way I can deactivate the AutoPark temporarily before car washes? Thanks
The message on the screen read “AutoPark Engaged Shift to P then Shift to Gear.”
Your vehicle is equipped with an Electric Park Break system (EPB).
The display message showed you exactly the steps you needed to follow. Shift to "P" and then shift to 'Gear". By shifting manually to "P", the AutoPark feature is being disengaged. Then the vehicle allows you to move the shifter to the desired gear.
Please refer to the owner's manual for additional details. The AutoPark feature can be disabled from the customer programmable features section of the U-Connect settings.
 
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