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Do braided stainless steel brake lines make a difference in every day driving? I have a 2012 Overland with Brembo calipers. I'm going to be taking them off to paint them and was thinking of putting on the stainless brake lines. Is it worth it and what brand should I use. Can someone help me out with finding the right kit? Is this what I need and all I need? Why is there 6 lines? Thanks
 

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If you ever cut open an OEM rubber hose, I have, you will find a very strong metal coil molded within the rubber.... ...i.e. it does exactly the same as the SS braiding.....

Opinions vary, that the SS braided hoses do make a difference or they make no difference at all..... ....if they do make a difference, they are likely such a subtle difference its only relative to racing.....

If the look is what your after, they make kits to cover the oem hoses with SS braiding that are much cheaper than the actual hose itself......

Ford often molds braiding into their lines, while others have a stiff coil, that is why the manuals warn NOT to clamp brake hoses to prevent brake fluid from dripping, depending on what type of hose it is, the clamping can damage it.....
 

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I purchased the StopTech ones for mine when I did the brake upgrade. They did not thread onto the factory hard lines. Just a heads up if you try to purchase them.
 

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Braided stainless lines are race only in most cases. I only run them on my race cars and replace them every 2 years. The downside to the braided lines on the street especially for a vehicle used year round is that grit ends up in the braided material and then begins to chafe the rubber underneath. That includes salt or the salt substitutes used where we have winter weather. And there are a lot of these lines out there that are NOT DOT approved. I would suspect that Stoptech (now owned by a huge global company- Centric) may have theirs DOT approved but I don't know that. The Stoptech 355mm brakes I ran on an Audi S4 were not DOT approved.

The advantage to these stainless lines? They can be custom made by a reputable source to any configuration needed in custom brake applications. And under extreme loading (Road Atlanta on the back straight at 160 mph into the tight left hander, or 150+ at Road America into Canada Corner) these lines maintain their consistency lap after lap. On a street car I doubt most people will notice the difference. The only time people rave about them are when they've taken off 6+ year old rubber lines and switch to the braided lines. I would bet the same improvement would be felt if the old lines were just replaced with brand new OE lines.

Just my 2 cents worth after 30+ years using braided stainless lines on my race cars and 2 different daily driven street cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Braided stainless lines are race only in most cases. I only run them on my race cars and replace them every 2 years. The downside to the braided lines on the street especially for a vehicle used year round is that grit ends up in the braided material and then begins to chafe the rubber underneath. That includes salt or the salt substitutes used where we have winter weather. And there are a lot of these lines out there that are NOT DOT approved. I would suspect that Stoptech (now owned by a huge global company- Centric) may have theirs DOT approved but I don't know that. The Stoptech 355mm brakes I ran on an Audi S4 were not DOT approved.

The advantage to these stainless lines? They can be custom made by a reputable source to any configuration needed in custom brake applications. And under extreme loading (Road Atlanta on the back straight at 160 mph into the tight left hander, or 150+ at Road America into Canada Corner) these lines maintain their consistency lap after lap. On a street car I doubt most people will notice the difference. The only time people rave about them are when they've taken off 6+ year old rubber lines and switch to the braided lines. I would bet the same improvement would be felt if the old lines were just replaced with brand new OE lines.

Just my 2 cents worth after 30+ years using braided stainless lines on my race cars and 2 different daily driven street cars.
Very good information...Thank You
 

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DOT requires a special test done to approve brake hoses. The hose is put in a machine that whips the hose back and forth at high g's for hours, at the end of the test if the hose is compromised in anyway it fails. Its sorta of a stupid test, but most SS braided hoses will have fraying in the SS braids near the end of the hose. Thus most are NOT DOT approved, and you'd run the risk during a state safety inspection failing for none-DOT approved brake hoses.

The fact the SS Braided hose don't have any safety problems in racing sorta makes the argument the DOT test is bogus, but its the law (or more accurately the reg that has the power of law) all you can do is write your congressman and Senators.

There is at least one brand of SS Braided hose a few years ago (I haven't checked recently) that has a thick clear Teflon shield on the last few inches of both ends of the hose, the shield prevents the SS braiding from fraying on the ends during the testing, and thus they pass the test and are DOT approved. I'm sure you could look through any speed catalog like Summit or Jegs and find these SS braided hoses advertising they are DOT Approved and thus street legal.
 

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Ditto on the Stoptech SS lines.. Won't fit on the hard line.. Now have send the rears and the fronts back..
 
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