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2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought my 2015 JGC new back in April of 2015. I never gave the spare a thought until yesterday. I went to check it, and found I have to remove it out of the tire well, because the valve is facing down. So I didn't feel like wrestling with it, and let it be. Do they sell some kind of valve extension I can attach, that will allow me to check it without have to fight with the damn thing?

Or do those screw on extensions all leak? I hate going through all of this just to keep the damn thing properly inflated. My 2018 Toyota has the spare with the valve facing up, so it was easy to check. My 1991 F-150 has it mounted underneath, so I had to crawl underneath, but it was still easier than this Jeep is going to be.
 

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While this isn't exactly the answer you're looking for, I would just carry a $30 tire inflator, and not worry about the pressure in your spare. Just top off the pressure in the spare if/when you ever end up using it.

Or if you have a full-size spare, start cycling it into your regular tire rotations, and then it'll never be sitting in your spare tire cubby more than 5-8k miles at a time.
 
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IMHO, don't overthink it; the spare loses air so slowly that nearly any "solution" is more trouble than just checking the spare once every year or two. If you're particularly concerned about it, carry a tire inflator as WK2-Overland suggests. That's a multi-purpose tool you'll easily appreciate for its many uses.

Or if you have a full-size spare, start cycling it into your regular tire rotations, and then it'll never be sitting in your spare tire cubby more than 5-8k miles at a time.
This was a good idea for many years with older vehicles, but the spare on most WK2 years and trims is mounted to a basic Mopar steel wheel. And doesn't have a TPMS sensor. Those are easily-solvable problems, to be sure, but the solutions are expensive.
 

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This was a good idea for many years with older vehicles, but the spare on most WK2 years and trims is mounted to a basic Mopar steel wheel. And doesn't have a TPMS sensor. Those are easily-solvable problems, to be sure, but the solutions are expensive.
You are correct - mine came with a donut spare, so I bought a 5th matching wheel from ebay, and had Discount Tire put in a TPMS sensor for me - all in it was about $200 for the wheel, $85 for the TPMS with install and balancing (and they threw in a free tire rotation). Plus I had to get a 5th tire as well, which you wouldn't have to do if your car came with full-size spare, but that added $280 for me). Somewhat pricey, but it comes with the added bonus of having to buy new tires 20% less often ;)
 

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2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
While this isn't exactly the answer you're looking for, I would just carry a $30 tire inflator, and not worry about the pressure in your spare. Just top off the pressure in the spare if/when you ever end up using it.
I feel stupid for saying as obvious of a solution as this is, I completely never thought of it. (I have a compressor in my garage, along with 2 retractable hose reels. So I never gave anything else a thought). But it certainly eliminates the problem. I can buy a nice, small tire inflator, and toss it in the well, and forget about it.
 

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2014 Summit 5.7 4wd 20" tires swapped to 18", added all skid plates
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I bought a $30 Tire pressure monitoring system, the kind that has a little cap you screw onto the valve stem and the readout that plugs into a powerpoint. I put one of the caps on the spare tires in each of my vehicles (keep track of which cap is on which vehicle). To check spare tire pressure just fire up the readout. You might only be able to get a reading if you just drove the car so the cap thinks it's been jiggled and turns on.. I'm not sure of that, some people say it.
 

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2014 Summit 5.7 4wd 20" tires swapped to 18", added all skid plates
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That wouldn’t solve this problem because you couldn’t see it.
If your comment is in reply to my post I don't think you get the picture. You put the pressure monitors on the spare and put it back in it's hole. The read out device is plugged into the cigarette lighter whenever you wish to check the pressure and you just look at the readout.
 

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A lot of cars flip the spare to give you and extra "well" for storage. I believe some meticulous MB club owners started selling extension hoses to easily monitor flipped spare tires in their cars and sold them in a club bulletin. That was years ago. I imagine there is a made in china knock off of the idea by now: Amazon.com: Bluecell 2pcs 8.25’’ Flexible Extension Tire Valve Adaptor for Universal Cars Truck Motorcycle Bike : Automotive

If I can find the space, an emergency tire inflator is also a decent option. I'm probably going to do both options...
 

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I just bought 2 of these on sale this morning at Harbor Freight.

Can't speak to that particular one... but... I had one like it and when I went to use it it lasted about 10 seconds and locked up. Then I bought a fancier one. When I got it I tried it briefly to make sure it worked. It did. Then a few months later I actually needed it with an actual almost flat tire. It took it a VERY long time to move enough air to get the tire to a reasonable pressure and then it burned out. So I'm on a third one. This one did pump up a nearly flat tire without burning out but it was plenty hot at the end. Realistically these are not really designed to pump the volume of air these tires need and do it in one continuous run without any cool down. If you want to see a bunch of them tested go to project farm's video on youtube.....
 

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I just bought 2 of these on sale this morning at Harbor Freight.

Ive had this one for a couple years Pro tip disconnect it from the pump then attach it to your tire much easier then Turn the Pump on and connect the quick disconnect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
.....If you want to see a bunch of them tested go to project farm's video on youtube.....
I did, and that's why I chose the Harbor Freight model. It performed at or right at the top of the 9 or so he tested. (8:20 / 14:00 in the video). The problem with a lot of these pumps are they are gear driven with cheap plastic gears that don't hold up, and get all chewed up. (The Kobalt model sold at Lowe's has customer complaints left and right about chewed up plastic gears).

The Harbor Freight "Pittsburgh" model is a direct drive. No gears = fewer parts = fewer problems. Also a lot of these use gears so they can gear the unit down to be able to use a smaller, cheaper motor. That adds to even more problems. The Harbor Freight pump also has a metal piston, connecting rod, and cylinder sleeve. Not plastic. (16:00)

 

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2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit 3.6L 4x2
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In both my Overland and Summit, in which I changed the Summit donut to a full size spare, I pumped them up to the 44psi maximum.
Checking it every 6 months its never dropped to less than 38psi. All that being said, I carry a Slime kit with compressor. ...just in case😉
 
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