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WK2 EcoDiesel
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I replaced my radiator the weekend before last, and noticed two things that changed the opinions I had about coolant system flushes and oil catch cans, so I wanted to share this with the community.

I have a 2016 WK2 Limited with the EcoDiesel engine which is a turbocharged engine, and I noticed that my coolant was running low repeatedly. Not a rapid loss, but I had to refill the reservoir once a month. Finally, while replacing the differential and transfer case oils, I found where the radiator was leaking on the seal for the driver's side plastic endtank crimp, and decided to replace it.

First, I had to disconnect the resonator and noticed it was oily. The tubing on the pressurized air was also oily, but I had expected this somewhat. Then, when I disconnected the intercooler, I poured out an obscene amount of watery oil that had pooled in the bottom of the intercooler. This made me realize that all of the talk on forums like this about the centrifugal oil separator not being enough to take the oil out of the PCV stream and needing a oil catch can wasn't a gold-plated solution for a problem that doesn't exist.

Second, I had read suggestions to do a coolant flush if changing out the radiator, but I didn't expect that would be needed, especially for an engine that was only five years old with about 90,000 miles. However, while the coolant was not dirty/rusty looking with no obvious entrained solids, and the reservoir was mostly clean, the radiator hosing was full of sludge from the coolant additives. It cleaned out readily and dissolved easily in distilled water when I completely removed the hoses. But it was still disturbing to see that much sediment, which has to be throughout the engine also, in curves or low spots. This picture is of the hot radiator hose from the thermostat housing on the engine, after it was disconnected from the radiator. The cold radiator hose on the output of the radiator had even more sludge in it. I had been using the Mopar coolant at a stock 50/50 mix.

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Are you the original owner? If a previous owner added a different kind of coolant at any point, especially if it was conventional antifreeze, it tends to react with the other coolant in a way that makes it congeal. Almost like jello.
 

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WK2 EcoDiesel
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are you the original owner? If a previous owner added a different kind of coolant at any point, especially if it was conventional antifreeze, it tends to react with the other coolant in a way that makes it congeal. Almost like jello.
I am. Nothing was ever added except the OEM spec Mopar coolant at a 50/50 premix.
 

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I am. Nothing was ever added except the OEM spec Mopar coolant at a 50/50 premix.
Weird. Maybe the Mopar coolant just doesn't hold up very well over time.
 
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