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Hi everyone. I'm looking for some clarification on the towing with a 2014/2015 GC EcoDiesel 4wd. I looked and searched through the site but still wasn't completely sure. I am new to the Jeep world. The wife and I have been looking at getting one in the very near future but I can't seem to get a clear answer on towing. I have looked all over and called a few places and seem to get different answers. Last night I found the WK2Jeeps site with the manuals and things. To me it looks like all of the EcoDiesels with the OEM tow hitch installed are rated to tow 7200lbs. With one I was looking at the dealer said it was only rated for 5200lbs. Then I called another dealer and was told all of them are 6200lbs, which makes me think they were looking at the 3.6L V-6 instead, but then I even called Jeep with a VIN and was told it came with the factory Class-IV 10,000 hitch but was only rated to 6,200lbs. I can't seem to find a clear answer. Does it make a difference on the towing if it has the QL Air Suspension over traditional on how much it can tow? I was originally planning to go without the Air Suspension since a lot of people seem to say stay away from it. Most of the driving will be highway to and from work (150 ish miles a day) but want the ability to tow a 20-22 ft camper and maybe a little off roading here and there. Should I be trying to skip the Air Suspension? I would get the warranty if possible but I'm not sure if I am able to add it on now due to the year based on what I found on the Mopar MaxCare site. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
 

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When in doubt, go to the manufacturer. The tire and payload capacities per year, trim, engines, and drive type are listed there for multiple years.

 
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Discussion Starter #3
DieselDrax, Thanks. I was able to find a VIN decoder and have ran some VINs through it. Come across 3500, 6200, and 7200 lbs. Now I just need to narrow down if I want the QL Air Suspension or Traditional and see if that plays a big role in the towing. I don't plan on lifting it since I will be commuting a bit. From what I have come across it seems both suspension options have load leveling? Am I mistaken with that? Without traditional being electronic shocks it doesn't seem like it would be.
 

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Even if you CAN tow 7200# doesn't mean you should. anything over 5K I'd say would require a WDH as a min. I have a 6K Tritoon and when its back there, you KNOW it. Makes me nervous on long distances. That why I still have my 3/4 ton RAM...
 

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2014 Overland here. Love the air suspension for towing, stays nice and level. Have towed a little over 5k and very happy with how it went.
 

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If you have the EcoDiesel with the tow package, that would come with the Class IV hitch receiver, HD cooling, HD brakes, and auto leveling rear suspension.

The MAX specs for the above and 4WD would be:
~1,050 Lbs of payload
7,200 Lbs in tow,
720 Lbs on tongue (which counts as cargo against your max payload of about 1,050 Lbs)
Front Axle: 3,200 Lbs
Rear Axle: 3,700 Lbs

I tow a 27' total length trailer that weighs about 6,000 Lb (6,500 Lb with water)
That damn near maxes out my payload and rear axle numbers depending on if/what I load in the back of the Jeep.

If you have air suspension, you likely don't have the tow package which means you would also not have the Class IV hitch and would be limited to at most 6,200 Lb. That's my situation, and my guess for you.
 

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If you have the EcoDiesel with the tow package, that would come with the Class IV hitch receiver, HD cooling, HD brakes, and auto leveling rear suspension - NOT air suspension.

The MAX specs for the above and 4WD would be:
~1,050 Lbs of payload
7,200 Lbs in tow,
720 Lbs on tongue (which counts as cargo against your max payload of about 1,050 Lbs)
Front Axle: 3,200 Lbs
Rear Axle: 3,700 Lbs

I tow a 27' total length trailer that weighs about 6,000 Lb (6,500 Lb with water)
That damn near maxes out my payload and rear axle numbers depending on if/what I load in the back of the Jeep.

If you have air suspension, you likely don't have the tow package which means you would also not have the Class IV hitch and would be limited to at most 6,200 Lb. That's my situation, and my guess for you.
No reason to speculate about what a Jeep might or might not have, it's easy to check by entering the VIN here - FCA RAM

My wife's Summit has the air suspension and the Trailer Tow Group IV with the class IV hitch.
 

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If you have the EcoDiesel with the tow package, that would come with the Class IV hitch receiver, HD cooling, HD brakes, and auto leveling rear suspension - NOT air suspension.

If you have air suspension, you likely don't have the tow package which means you would also not have the Class IV hitch and would be limited to at most 6,200 Lb. That's my situation, and my guess for you.
Not wanting to argue but my Overland definitely has the tow package and air suspension. I can lower the entire SUV down to almost car height and raise it impressively high for offroading. Yes it does autolevel as well and this is great for towing so your headlights aren't pointing at the sky.
 

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Not wanting to argue but my Overland definitely has the tow package and air suspension. I can lower the entire SUV down to almost car height and raise it impressively high for offroading. Yes it does autolevel as well and this is great for towing so your headlights aren't pointing at the sky.
Overland and Summit both have air suspension and keep it with the tow package option.
 

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Not wanting to argue but my Overland definitely has the tow package and air suspension. I can lower the entire SUV down to almost car height and raise it impressively high for offroading. Yes it does autolevel as well and this is great for towing so your headlights aren't pointing at the sky.
Overland and Summit both have air suspension and keep it with the tow package option.
In fact, when you add the package with Quadra-Lift on trims that don't come standard with it it includes Trailer Tow Group IV. Similarly, the trims that come with Quadra-Lift standard also include Trailer Tow Group IV as standard. So it's actually the opposite of what was claimed, if you have Quadra-Lift you are guaranteed to have Trailer Tow Group IV. If you don't have Quadra-Lift then Trailer Tow Group IV is often times an option depending on engine and drivetrain selected.

It is actually impossible to option a WK2 with Quadra-Lift WITHOUT Trailer Tow Group IV, so I'm curious what makes @MKyle think his is configured that way. Going all the way back to the 2014 info from Jeep...

228324
 
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Thanks for the correction. I was just guessing since I don't have that configuration, I haven't ever looked it up.
My 2014 build sheet just says "Rear Load Leveling Suspension " with the Trailer Tow Group IV package.
I haven't heard of any air compressor on my Jeep or have any controls for it, and the rear suspension looks like regular shock-style dampers. Where can I look to confirm 100%?
 

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Thanks for the correction. I was just guessing since I don't have that configuration, I haven't ever looked it up.
My 2014 build sheet just says "Rear Load Leveling Suspension " with the Trailer Tow Group IV package.
I haven't heard of any air compressor on my Jeep or have any controls for it, and the rear suspension looks like regular shock-style dampers. Where can I look to confirm 100%?
If you have no ride height buttons (to the right of the Terrain-Select knob, if you have it) then you have no air suspension. The load-leveling suspension is not air suspension and the dampers look similar to normal dampers. The load-leveling suspension uses Sachs Nivomat dampers - Nivomat®
 
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If you have no ride height buttons (to the right of the Terrain-Select knob, if you have it) then you have no air suspension. The load-leveling suspension is not air suspension and the dampers look similar to normal dampers. The load-leveling suspension uses Sachs Nivomat dampers - Nivomat®
That's what I had thought.
Appreciate ya, it really is a neat feature!
 

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I use my14 Overland similarly to the OP's stated use case. It does everything wonderfully, and knowing what I know now after 217,000 miles, I would absolutely get the QL air suspension. The leveling for towing is awesome and the ground clearance it provides for offroading is equally awesome. I've had no issues with the air suspension. I've towed about 5500lbs and am so damn impressed with the EcoDiesel for this job.
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
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2016 Overland CRD here, with QL and tow package. Very happy with it. Have driven 140,000 miles.

The two links @DieselDrax posted upthread, about towing specs and VIN check, are great — no guessing, get the needed information directly from the source. Thank you for those.

To the OP @Mr.Gixxer, based on your OP, I recommend QL and tow package, but before you buy I recommend test driving one, and raise the QL up to OR-1 height and go over some small bumps sufficiently fast enough to hear and feel the loud CLUNK! that happens. It shouldn't take much speed. Then, raise up to OR-2 and repeat. Be advised that this is normal, but you'll want to hear and feel it before you buy, just so you know what you're getting.

My usage is 95-99% on road and 1-5% on trail, and QL is perfect for me. Just raise 'er up when needed.

P.S. My cousin had a GSXR 750 and I rode it once. Just once. Got 'er on the interstate and in No Time Flat I had 'er up to 135 MPH. A fun motorcycle and impressive machine.
 

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The JGC is a great towing vehicle, except for the friggin' overheating issues... Not an issue on flat ground, though.

I use a WDH so I've never noticed the trailer sway control having to kick in, although the rig behaved well the one time I had to 'panic stop' (lots of ABS action & I flat-spotted the trailer tires). With a WDH it's very stable in high winds (more so than my 2000 JGC WJ).

Load equalization / leveling works great.

If you're not in California, get the Green Diesel Engineering Hot Tune with the Engine Break option if you're planning on towing in mountains. And watch your coolant & oil temps on long climbs...
 

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@Halfdeaf a WDH doesn’t control sway unless it has built in sway control. WDH and sway control are two different things, but a decent WDH will have sway control by way of adding friction to sliding/pivot points. The Jeep trailer sway control comes into play after it detects sway has started and is there to help prevent an accident, WDH sway control helps prevent it in the first place.

You may know this, I’m just clarifying in case someone doesn’t know any better and thinks all WDHs provide sway control when that’s not the case.
 
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I could have worded my post better...

Most modern WDHs include sway control; mine is an Equal-I-Zer, and it works quite well.

My understanding of the JGC sway control is that it uses the ABS system to dampen the sway once it's detected.

I was just trying to say that because of my hitch, I have never felt the effects of the JGC trying to correct for sway.
 

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My understanding of the JGC sway control is that it uses the ABS system to dampen the sway once it's detected.

I was just trying to say that because of my hitch, I have never felt the effects of the JGC trying to correct for sway.
Drax - I second this response...I assumed he meant the built in sway control system that Jeep includes. I have no idea if it works...maybe that's a good thing.
 

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The JGC is a great towing vehicle, except for the friggin' overheating issues... Not an issue on flat ground, though.

I use a WDH so I've never noticed the trailer sway control having to kick in, although the rig behaved well the one time I had to 'panic stop' (lots of ABS action & I flat-spotted the trailer tires). With a WDH it's very stable in high winds (more so than my 2000 JGC WJ).

Load equalization / leveling works great.

If you're not in California, get the Green Diesel Engineering Hot Tune with the Engine Break option if you're planning on towing in mountains. And watch your coolant & oil temps on long climbs...
I'm one of the fortunate ones -- my JGC doesn't suffer from the overheating problems (at least... not yet! Keeping my fingers crossed). I tow on occasion. The most I've towed was a car loaded on a U-Haul auto transport trailer, about 5,000+ lbs total weight. I towed that into and over the local mountains here, not high up to about 3,000 feet, and the JGC CRD didn't even breathe heavy. I barely felt the trailer back there. I was quite impressed.

Those U-Haul trailers have something on the hitch, not sure if its WDH or sway control. I think it is a brake assist. Regardless, I didn't have any problem with sway, and the QL kept the JGC riding flat (not the nose pointed to the sky). I've seen some other rigs towing and the tow vehicle's back end is pushed way down, nose pointed to the sky... and that doesn't look very safe to me.

BTW I am in CA so GDE tune is out for me.
 
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