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And they accomplish just that by charging the $3,500 for the V8 lol.
Now MSRP is up to $3795.00 for the Hemi V8!
But also be aware that is a package price that includes other things with it, like HD brakes a different rear end drive ratio, possibly HD cooling as well.
 

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When I bought my V8 Summit a couple years ago the price of the V8 was $2695. But that $2695 for the V8 also included ELSD, HD Brakes, HD Cooling and the more heavy duty 8HP70 ZF made transmission. I suppose it depends on what you intend to use the jeep for but for me on a 55k vehicle all those items for $2695 was a bargain.
 

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Also diesels are actually becoming more rare, and after you get the fix with the settlement you can go GDE tune and have a pretty great, fuel efficient, and WARRANTED platform that really can't be bought readily any longer.

I say that pushed its value up... Also fuel is up .60 a gal here in the last month RUL is fairly close to diesel now, and I get at least 25% better mileage and have since new....

Just finished a 2700 mile trip with it and it was 28 MPG at 85 MPH and ran flawlessly...
 

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It's a pretty simple concept on the secondary market. The larger engine that costs more when new in the same vehicle when an engine choice is given will always garner a higher resale value at trade in time.

That's a universal truth for just about any mass produced vehicle. After many years in the used car marketplace I saw this hundreds if not thousands of times. Weather you or someone else is interested in a used Hemi powered Jeep is irrelevant..... those that are, "the smaller audience" as you call them, will have to pay more for them as they are worth more than the V6 equipped models.
That is generally true but not always... when gas prices go up enough to cause buyers to treat mileage as a priority, prices of used V8 vehicles go down due to lack of demand (sellers have to lower prices to attract buyers). This happened during the oil crises of the '70s and to a lesser extent during the days of average gas prices over $4.00 in 2008.

I remember in the '70s there were some gas guzzling V8 cars that you couldn't give away because nobody wanted them.
 

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In my area there aren't many used 8's around compared to 6's, and the highest I could find for the same vehicle (in all other respects) was $950 higher (asking price)... 2016 Limited with 65,000 miles with and without the hemi. I don't see the wisdom in buying the hemi for $3K more with a better re-sale value in mind when that re-sale value depreciates to under $1K after a few years. That being said, I strongly believe that the hemi is a great engine for somebody who wants one. I just wouldn't factor in "better resale value" in my buying decision, which was the OP's original question.
 

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The fuel mileage thing kinda intrigues me.
From what I've seen, the 3.6 (C/D observed: 18 mpg) gets on average 2mpg more than the 5.7(C/D observed: 16 mpg), which on average gets 2mpg more than the 6.4(C/D observed: 14 mpg).
~26gal tank, that means the V6 can go approx 40 miles further than the 5.7 hemi.
So, 40 miles divided by 16mpg is going to run you ~3gals of gas.
Say gas is $5 a gallon, which it isn't but lets say it is... that's $15 a tank.
My wife uses about 3/4 to 7/8 a tank a week... (over 50 miles a day, and weekend errands)
For us that represents less than $15 bux a week... and since gas is under $3 a gallon here... it really works out to less than $9 bux... more like $5 if we really wanted to get there... lets just say $10 for arguments sake.

If $10 a week is something you really need to budget... why are you looking at a $30k plus 5000lb vehicle?

Sure, more is more and there is no arguing that...

My point is that if $10 a week is a problem, you really need to be looking at a $5-10K car that gets 35-40mpg so you can actually live a little.
I remember when I was much younger and $10 a week was a consideration... and I sure a heck wasn't looking at $30k vehicles, much less 5000lbs+ ones... I was driving well used 4cylinder eccono machines.


It's not like the 3.6 gets 30+mpg and the 5.7 gets 10mpg... bundle it down and it's less than $10 a week...
And, if you are going though 2 - 3 tanks a week... I highly suggest a Prius or older diesel Jetta for your daily commute.
 

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In my area there aren't many used 8's around compared to 6's, and the highest I could find for the same vehicle (in all other respects) was $950 higher (asking price)... 2016 Limited with 65,000 miles with and without the hemi. I don't see the wisdom in buying the hemi for $3K more with a better re-sale value in mind when that re-sale value depreciates to under $1K after a few years. That being said, I strongly believe that the hemi is a great engine for somebody who wants one. I just wouldn't factor in "better resale value" in my buying decision, which was the OP's original question.
Not really understanding what's your point??

A Hemi V8 equipped WK2 will cost more when new and will have a higher resale value at trade in time. That's not an opinion, it's a fact!... Doesn't really matter what region your in or what gas prices your paying.

For those that may consider resale values at trade in time when deciding on a new vehicle purchase that fact is pretty indisputable. Why wouldn't you or the OP "factor that in" when making a purchasing decision?
Go a head and check KBB trade in values for identical equipped Grand Cherokees V8 vs. V6 in any region you want and you'll see the increased value of a V8 over a V6.
Wait you did just that in your area and found an identical Grand Cherokee with a V8 vs. one with a V6 was worth about ~1K more. Right? You still don't see the point??

"Better resale value at trade in time" is just one of the many benefits of the Hemi V8, even if that apparently doesn't matter to you!
 

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Not really understanding what's your point??

A Hemi V8 equipped WK2 will cost more when new and will have a higher resale value at trade in time. That's not an opinion, it's a fact!... Doesn't really matter what region your in or what gas prices your paying.

For those that may consider resale values at trade in time when deciding on a new vehicle purchase that fact is pretty indisputable. Why wouldn't you or the OP "factor that in" when making a purchasing decision?
Go a head and check KBB trade in values for identical equipped Grand Cherokees V8 vs. V6 in any region you want and you'll see the increased value of a V8 over a V6.
Wait you did just that in your area and found an identical Grand Cherokee with a V8 vs. one with a V6 was worth about ~1K more. Right? You still don't see the point??

"Better resale value at trade in time" is just one of the many benefits of the Hemi V8, even if that apparently doesn't matter to you!
I would hate to have someone with your reasoning skills for my accountant...:slapfight:
 

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Not really understanding what's your point??

A Hemi V8 equipped WK2 will cost more when new and will have a higher resale value at trade in time. That's not an opinion, it's a fact!... Doesn't really matter what region your in or what gas prices your paying.

For those that may consider resale values at trade in time when deciding on a new vehicle purchase that fact is pretty indisputable. Why wouldn't you or the OP "factor that in" when making a purchasing decision?
Go a head and check KBB trade in values for identical equipped Grand Cherokees V8 vs. V6 in any region you want and you'll see the increased value of a V8 over a V6.
Wait you did just that in your area and found an identical Grand Cherokee with a V8 vs. one with a V6 was worth about ~1K more. Right? You still don't see the point??

"Better resale value at trade in time" is just one of the many benefits of the Hemi V8, even if that apparently doesn't matter to you!
Yeah it doesn't matter to me... because $950 better resale value on a $3,000 investment over just a few years is some substantial depreciation. So what if the hemi was $10K more... instead of losing 66% of its value it would lose 90% of its value. Is it still worth it then? My point is that if you want the hemi by all means buy it. Just don't fool yourself into getting it because you're justifying better resale value as a reason... because that's some poor logic for an engine that is actually depreciating much faster than the rest of your vehicle.
 

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I would hate to have someone with your reasoning skills for my accountant...:slapfight:
I agree! You’re fired as my accountant!

I got the Hemi because I wanted it. It was a $3,795 option, which is stupidly expensive, but I wanted it and it’s my money!

Trade in value wasn’t a factor for me. Getting what I wanted was.

Now a $3,795 option worth $1,000 a few years later... bad investment!! Haha

Life is too short to not get what you want if you can afford it.
 

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The fuel mileage thing kinda intrigues me.
From what I've seen, the 3.6 (C/D observed: 18 mpg) gets on average 2mpg more than the 5.7(C/D observed: 16 mpg), which on average gets 2mpg more than the 6.4(C/D observed: 14 mpg).
~26gal tank, that means the V6 can go approx 40 miles further than the 5.7 hemi.
So, 40 miles divided by 16mpg is going to run you ~3gals of gas.
Say gas is $5 a gallon, which it isn't but lets say it is... that's $15 a tank.
My wife uses about 3/4 to 7/8 a tank a week... (over 50 miles a day, and weekend errands)
For us that represents less than $15 bux a week... and since gas is under $3 a gallon here... it really works out to less than $9 bux... more like $5 if we really wanted to get there... lets just say $10 for arguments sake.

If $10 a week is something you really need to budget... why are you looking at a $30k plus 5000lb vehicle?

Sure, more is more and there is no arguing that...

My point is that if $10 a week is a problem, you really need to be looking at a $5-10K car that gets 35-40mpg so you can actually live a little.
I remember when I was much younger and $10 a week was a consideration... and I sure a heck wasn't looking at $30k vehicles, much less 5000lbs+ ones... I was driving well used 4cylinder eccono machines.


It's not like the 3.6 gets 30+mpg and the 5.7 gets 10mpg... bundle it down and it's less than $10 a week...
And, if you are going though 2 - 3 tanks a week... I highly suggest a Prius or older diesel Jetta for your daily commute.
Combined mileage published by the EPA for the 2018 6 cyl is 21 and for the 5.7 is 17. And the 5.7 requires mid-grade fuel. For me personally the additional cost isn't a concern (although with gas prices rising it could be). But I do a lot of driving every week and I routinely get around 500 miles out of a tank before having to refill. A coworker of mine with the 5.7 in his GC said he's never seen (even nearly) 500 miles (maybe he has a heavy foot and others with the 5.7 do get that range). And I don't have any issues with the power of my 6, including easily towing my 20' Grady (fairly heavy boat for its size). Some people hate the start stop, so that's something to consider I suppose. But I could care less about it, it doesn't bother me as I find it seamless. I really think the whole engine thing just comes down to personal preference and individuals justifying whether the price and cost to run is worth it to them. There's really no right or wrong answer to this debate. Personal preference.
 

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I agree! You’re fired as my accountant!
I got the Hemi because I wanted it. It was a $3,795 option, which is stupidly expensive, but I wanted it and it’s my money!
Trade in value wasn’t a factor for me. Getting what I wanted was.
Now a $3,795 option worth $1,000 a few years later... bad investment!! Haha
Life is too short to not get what you want if you can afford it.
A 5.7–Liter V8 HEMI® MDS VVT Engine in a 1500 is only $1,450 and 395 HP and has the same V-6 base engine as the Grand Cherokee. So 3,795 is kind of a ripoff.......:thumbsup:
 

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I would hate to have someone with your reasoning skills for my accountant...:slapfight:
Accountant?? WTF

Really??

Do you consult your accountant when buying a new Jeep. Does he place an engine recommendation for you using his reasoning skills as well?

A new mass produced vehicle is a depreciating asset so yea that 3.5K engine option is going to depreciate right along with the rest of the vehicle. Ask your "accountant" to use his superior reasoning skills to explain that to you. That's the way it works, like it or not. Do you expect any option you paid x-amount of dollars for new, to be worth X-amount of dollars 3 yrs later? Do you?? Maybe you need to ask your "accountant" to explain what depreciating asset means.
Doesn't change the fact that the WK2 equipped with the larger more expensive V8 engine will always get more cash at trade in time vs. the same WK2 with the V6.
That was the question the OP asked to begin this thread. Wasn't it?

Why is it that every V6 vs. V8 discussion always leads to one group throwing shade on the other because they chose the "other" engine option. Why?? If you want a V6 get one..... If you prefer the Hemi get that.

Better resale value at trade in time is just one of the many benefits of the Hemi V8 in a 5000lb WK2, that's a fact, plain and simple. You V6 owners don't need to get all butt hurt over it, nor do you need to justify why you chose the V6, but that's seems to be where these threads always go. Why?
 

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Accountant?? WTF

Really??

Do you consult your accountant when buying a new Jeep. Does he place an engine recommendation for you using his reasoning skills as well?

A new mass produced vehicle is a depreciating asset so yea that 3.5K engine option is going to depreciate right along with the rest of the vehicle. Ask your "accountant" to use his superior reasoning skills to explain that to you. That's the way it works, like it or not. Do you expect any option you paid x-amount of dollars for new, to be worth X-amount of dollars 3 yrs later? Do you?? Maybe you need to ask your "accountant" to explain what depreciating asset means.
Doesn't change the fact that the WK2 equipped with the larger more expensive V8 engine will always get more cash at trade in time vs. the same WK2 with the V6.
That was the question the OP asked to begin this thread. Wasn't it?

Why is it that every V6 vs. V8 discussion always leads to one group throwing shade on the other because they chose the "other" engine option. Why?? If you want a V6 get one..... If you prefer the Hemi get that.

Better resale value at trade in time is just one of the many benefits of the Hemi V8 in a 5000lb WK2, that's a fact, plain and simple. You V6 owners don't need to get all butt hurt over it, nor do you need to justify why you chose the V6, but that's seems to be where these threads always go. Why?
Who's butthurt? Looks like there's only one person in this discussion getting defensive or ranting. I've repeatedly said, get whatever engine you want... for me personally it's a toss-up and there are tradeoffs either way, but the topic of the discussion is "better resale value." So a factual discussion regarding accounting is in order. Relax man. Nobody's bashing your hemi.
 

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Let's play nice on yet another V8 thread... ;) Please.

Jim
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You see more of the V6's for sale because they simply make more and sell more. The V6 is more popular among consumers because of its lower price point and better fuel economy. The dealerships tend to stock more v6 models because they sell better. Obviously after leases are up and people trade in to buy new you are left with more of them for sale then the V8s.
 

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Combined mileage published by the EPA for the 2018 6 cyl is 21 and for the 5.7 is 17. And the 5.7 requires mid-grade fuel. For me personally the additional cost isn't a concern (although with gas prices rising it could be). But I do a lot of driving every week and I routinely get around 500 miles out of a tank before having to refill. A coworker of mine with the 5.7 in his GC said he's never seen (even nearly) 500 miles (maybe he has a heavy foot and others with the 5.7 do get that range). And I don't have any issues with the power of my 6, including easily towing my 20' Grady (fairly heavy boat for its size). Some people hate the start stop, so that's something to consider I suppose. But I could care less about it, it doesn't bother me as I find it seamless. I really think the whole engine thing just comes down to personal preference and individuals justifying whether the price and cost to run is worth it to them. There's really no right or wrong answer to this debate. Personal preference.
Real world combined is not what they quote. The difference most people quote on this forum is about 2 mi/gal. Also, the fuel for the V8 is mid-grad RECOMMENDED, not required. I have used regular in mine since new (56,000 now). The dealer recommended regular...
 

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A new mass produced vehicle is a depreciating asset so yea that 3.5K engine option is going to depreciate right along with the rest of the vehicle. Ask your "accountant" to use his superior reasoning skills to explain that to you. That's the way it works, like it or not. Do you expect any option you paid x-amount of dollars for new, to be worth X-amount of dollars 3 yrs later? Do you?? Maybe you need to ask your "accountant" to explain what depreciating asset means.
Doesn't change the fact that the WK2 equipped with the larger more expensive V8 engine will always get more cash at trade in time vs. the same WK2 with the V6.
That was the question the OP asked to begin this thread. Wasn't it?
I don't think anybody here is arguing that buying a V8 won't usually result in higher resale value. They're discussing whether that resale value is worth the extra cost if it was the deciding factor in the purchase. It shouldn't be - if you want the power of the V8 and don't mind the mileage hit or the added initial cost then by all means buy it. But don't buy it merely for resale value.

However, as mentioned earlier, there can be occasions where the V8 will actually have lower resale value than a V6. If gas prices continue climbing to over $4 per gallon, buyers could start looking for more economical transportation. That could be the V6 version or even some other model entirely. Depressed sales causes reduced prices... that's a fact of the economics of car sales. Dealers need to move inventory and if they have a vehicle that isn't selling, they will lower the price until it sells regardless of whether the V8 should be worth more or not.

Granted, the difference in mileage adds up to only a few dollars per fill-up but gas prices are an emotional thing. I've been in the field for over 20 years and you would be amazed at how much a price increase of only a few cents per gallon affects our volume of sales. Personally, I won't even make a left turn across traffic to save a couple of cents per gallon but there are people who will drive out of their way for the savings.

The other point is the depreciation. Sure, vehicles depreciate. But the Hemi option depreciating by two thirds in just three years is a far greater rate than the overall vehicle depreciation.
 

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Real world combined is not what they quote. The difference most people quote on this forum is about 2 mi/gal. Also, the fuel for the V8 is mid-grad RECOMMENDED, not required. I have used regular in mine since new (56,000 now). The dealer recommended regular...
Understood on recommenced vs. required. I stand corrected, thank you.

But if we're going to go with "real world" let's use some actual data from Fuelly (tracking real fillups and mileage). Fuelly reports on 4x4 Grand Cherokees reporting data from 2018 real world user combined MPG:

3.6: 93 vehicles reported, 18.78 mpg (combined), 2,450 fillups, 793,571 miles
5.7: 19 vehicles reported, 15.59 mpg (combined), 480 fillups, 139,633 miles


If these numbers are accurate, and with that sample size I'd presume they're pretty good numbers) the 3.6 appears to be around 20% more fuel efficient in combined (city and highway) driving than the 5.7. Some may want to factor that into a buying decision, other people could care less. With rising fuel costs more people may care more, further hurting the 5.7 resale value arguably.
 
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