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The corporate tax code disagrees with you. A pre tax dollar, when allowed, is a glorious thing and goes about 25-30% further.

And how many of those 63% who don't have $500 in the bank, own their own "corporations"? A "pre taxed dollar" is a "glorious thing" only when you actually have one. And forget the "universe", and just look at this country. That's where all of those dismal numbers correlate.
 

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I bought a 4K custom Wilson Combat, is that just plane stupid because I could’ve gotten a rock island armory for like $500.

No. What's, "just plain stupid" is comparing custom expensive, high quality firearms that hold their value, and in many cases appreciate, to cars that depreciate quickly, until they're worth little to nothing. And cost you money to buy, own, maintain, license, insure, and drive all the while you are eating the massive depreciation.
 

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All this talk of depreciation etc. is the last thing on my mind when i scope out a new vehicle i 'have' to have.

Depreciation is one part of the equation and always will be when signing the dotted line for a new vehicle.
Life is short so if one can justify an expensive new vehicle i say go for it.

'the one who dies with the most toys wins'.
and
'you can't take it with you'.
 

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write the check. write off what little you can. drive around with a constant smile and enjoy life. or you can kill brain cells trying to rationalize a purchase that is nothing other than an extremely overpriced, rapidly depreciating toy. go read Richard Kiyosaki's Rich Dad Poor dad and get yourself some assets to pay for the liability
 

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No. What's, "just plain stupid" is comparing custom expensive, high quality firearms that hold their value, and in many cases appreciate, to cars that depreciate quickly, until they're worth little to nothing. And cost you money to buy, own, maintain, license, insure, and drive all the while you are eating the massive depreciation.
:) Like the 2 Colt Pythons and 2 Series 70's Gold Cups I bought in the early 70's and that are still like new. (Pic's on request) Paid less than 2k for all of them together "brand new" in the 70's and I can sell them easily today for well over 10k. (probably more like 12 to 14k) Of course with inflation, it would take at least 10k in today's dollars to buy the same thing that cost 2k in the early 70's. However,,,, I wish you the best of luck trying to buy any firearm made with that level of quality/craftsmanship in today's market!
 

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The information is totally relevant. Just because you don't agree with it doesn't change that fact. I called B.S. because it is B.S. Making $1,400.00 a month payments on a depreciating asset is what's financially retarded and misguided. Coming to that determination is simple common sense. The problem with common sense, is it's not so common any longer.
Finance is about ratios. When someone who makes 500k/yr spends 100k on a car that's like someone who makes 50k/yr spending 10k on a used car. A payment of $1400/mo ends up around a 5 yr loan with 20% down, a relatively typical car loan. Some subscribe to the idea that depreciating assets should only be purchased with cash. Others in this thread have cited tax benefits and return on capitol as reasons why they might prefer finance.

Sure there are probably people out there who have a loan that they could qualify for but shouldn't have taken but I don't think it's accurate to say that the existence of a payment of that magnitude is an automatic moral absolute. Unless a TH owner is causing financial hardships in their family's life or mortgaging their future to the extent that they will spend their golden years eating Alpo and begging their children for day to day expenses I don't believe I have the moral authority to judge their decision to put a car within their means on credit as reprehensible.

The OP had done the math and it didn't pan out for him, he knew that. This thread was to help him understand under what circumstances that math does work, and the rationale behind it. I enjoyed reading this thread and the input from all posters. This appears to be a site where people from many walks of life can get together and discuss something they are interested in and that sounds pretty good to me.
 

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Finance is about ratios. When someone who makes 500k/yr spends 100k on a car that's like someone who makes 50k/yr spending 10k on a used car.

While that is true to a point, a dollar paid in interest, or lost in depreciation, is still a dollar. This regardless of the persons income who's paying or losing it. Having wealth helps to dilute the loss, and make it less noticeable. It doesn't change the numbers, or diminish the loss of value of the asset. It only makes it easier to absorb.
 

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what I've found in life there is a huge difference between needs and wants. You need food and water to live, but we often buy food we like even though it may cost more. You want the better cuts of meat etc. It's not always about the money....now wants are a whole different subject. You WANT a nice house, nice T.V. etc. and, if you are able and willing to pay for it, you do. The difference just gets magnified as the dollars increase.

The food you buy is worth zero after you eat it, so cost isn't the only factor. Just sayin....
 

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this is a funny thread.... want, need, afford, too many variables in resources and lifestyles to come up with a reason. on the one hand I would never pay over $60k for any passenger vehicle - the diminishing returns just won't let me do it.... I 'can' do it ... but my internal limiter won't allow it

but on the other hand i'm about $100k into converting a 2008 c4500 4x4 kodiak diesel ambulance into an RV - it's up on 42" military beadlocks now .... others, myself included, would consider this idiocy. I don't really have a good argument for it not being idiocy ... but maybe when it's done and i'm crusing the backroads of Utah it'll be worth it (to me).

who knows why we do the things we do, or buy the stuff we buy, but in my final moments i'd rather have spent the money and enjoyed something vice considering how big my bank account is that someone else will get to enjoy.
 

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what I've found in life there is a huge difference between needs and wants. You need food and water to live, but we often buy food we like even though it may cost more. You want the better cuts of meat etc. It's not always about the money....now wants are a whole different subject. You WANT a nice house, nice T.V. etc. and, if you are able and willing to pay for it, you do. The difference just gets magnified as the dollars increase.

The food you buy is worth zero after you eat it, so cost isn't the only factor. Just sayin....
au contraire. Once you've knoshed, you could apply it directly to your crops, at a non-zero risk of hepatitis, or let it merge into some innocent river as waste water and the solids as soil modifier.

The gaseous effluent is largely methane, with a few odorants, and you can make full synth motor oil or base stock from methane.


…. just sayin.


The Trackhawk isn't that expensive as grown-up toys go and has the added benefit of being a budget stoplight weapon compared to the higher cost toys.

I suppose with enough mental gymnastics you could even come up with some reason why it would be the perfect vehicle for your vocation.
 

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au contraire. Once you've knoshed, you could apply it directly to your crops, at a non-zero risk of hepatitis, or let it merge into some innocent river as waste water and the solids as soil modifier.

The gaseous effluent is largely methane, with a few odorants, and you can make full synth motor oil or base stock from methane.


…. just sayin.


The Trackhawk isn't that expensive as grown-up toys go and has the added benefit of being a budget stoplight weapon compared to the higher cost toys.

I suppose with enough mental gymnastics you could even come up with some reason why it would be the perfect vehicle for your vocation.
In Canada they are priced at $129,000 fully loaded. $40,000 more than a SRT. That is before taxes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 · (Edited)
In Canada they are priced at $129,000 fully loaded. $40,000 more than a SRT. That is before taxes.
Exactly. If the Trackhawk was priced more reasonably UP HERE, this thread wouldn't exist, and there'd be a Trackhawk in my garage.


Back in 2015 when the Hellcat Challenger first came out, US MSRP was around $59,995.


The Canadian dollar was much closer to parity so the Canadian MSRP was $63,995.


Only a $4,000 difference between the two, meant I bought one of the first ones and was quite happy with it.


Now, US Trackhawks are $102,555 (fully loaded) vs $131,935 CAD for the EXACT SAME truck.


$29,380 difference.


Insane.
 

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Exactly. If the Trackhawk was priced more reasonably UP HERE, this thread wouldn't exist, and there'd be a Trackhawk in my garage.


Back in 2015 when the Hellcat Challenger first came out, US MSRP was around $59,995.


The Canadian dollar was much closer to parity so the Canadian MSRP was $63,995.


Only a $4,000 difference between the two, meant I bought one of the first ones and was quite happy with it.


Now, US Trackhawks are $102,555 (fully loaded) vs $131,935 CAD for the EXACT SAME truck.


$29,380 difference.


Insane.
I know you ordered a SRT but there is a dealership here in Regina that has 3 2018 trackhawks for sale still. They have them priced at $90,000.
 

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Exactly. If the Trackhawk was priced more reasonably UP HERE, this thread wouldn't exist, and there'd be a Trackhawk in my garage.


Back in 2015 when the Hellcat Challenger first came out, US MSRP was around $59,995.


The Canadian dollar was much closer to parity so the Canadian MSRP was $63,995.


Only a $4,000 difference between the two, meant I bought one of the first ones and was quite happy with it.


Now, US Trackhawks are $102,555 (fully loaded) vs $131,935 CAD for the EXACT SAME truck.


$29,380 difference.


Insane.

In Canada you have legal pot, nationwide. Fair tradeoff. :D




As for the money, if it's what you really want and you can do it. Do it. Personally, I cannot justify the added expense over my Overland Hemi. (Just like some cant justify the Hemi over their V6... ) I could literally buy 2 Overland Hemi for the price of 1 Trackhawk. And from the drivers seat everything looks the same (granted it might make louder noises and go a helluva lot faster, but realistically it does not make a great sports car) And on that note, I'd rather take the remaining $50K and buy a real sports car. A nice 911 will bring just as many smiles, and not depreciate much at all, and maybe even appreciate in a few years.


Of course, I still stand by my original advice in this thread, to be fiscally responsible in your youth. Having plenty of money later in life opens lots of doors. Not having money will slam them in your face.


Something to think about, if you & your wife are currently at $180K and I assume enjoying the lifestyle that is available for you at that level. You will need to accumulate about $4.2M to retire at age 65 and have 80% of your current income, assuming 3% inflation. Depending on your current age, the amount you need to be saving is probably about the same as the annual cost of a TH payment for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #80 · (Edited)
In Canada you have legal pot, nationwide. Fair tradeoff. :D




As for the money, if it's what you really want and you can do it. Do it. Personally, I cannot justify the added expense over my Overland Hemi. (Just like some cant justify the Hemi over their V6... ) I could literally buy 2 Overland Hemi for the price of 1 Trackhawk. And from the drivers seat everything looks the same (granted it might make louder noises and go a helluva lot faster, but realistically it does not make a great sports car) And on that note, I'd rather take the remaining $50K and buy a real sports car. A nice 911 will bring just as many smiles, and not depreciate much at all, and maybe even appreciate in a few years.


Of course, I still stand by my original advice in this thread, to be fiscally responsible in your youth. Having plenty of money later in life opens lots of doors. Not having money will slam them in your face.


Something to think about, if you & your wife are currently at $180K and I assume enjoying the lifestyle that is available for you at that level. You will need to accumulate about $4.2M to retire at age 65 and have 80% of your current income, assuming 3% inflation. Depending on your current age, the amount you need to be saving is probably about the same as the annual cost of a TH payment for you.
Nice thing about our careers, is we have guaranteed pensions, benefits for life, etc, without even having to save anything on our own (not saying we DON'T save anything, but it's not required for retirement).

We are really lucky, and worked hard to get into the jobs we have. I realize this is not the norm for most.

I started this career young and will be able to retire with full pension at 57 years old (although i'll probably stick around as long as I can).

This also allows us to spend more of our money on 'discretionary things', but a Trackhawk is still hard to swallow at that price.
 
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