Jeep Garage  - Jeep Forum banner

21 - 40 of 68 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
I have the same tires and the answer is no. Many people have used 265 65 18 tires in many different brands with no rubbing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
I have the same tires and the answer is no. Many people have used 265 65 18 tires in many different brands with no rubbing.
With chains on? Just want to be sure as I’m likely to switch to this tire size. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
I can confirm 265 65 17 Duratracs don’t rub at all. I think there’s space for cables with that setup. Real chains are pretty thick. I wouldn’t use chains unless you have lots of clearance. Use cables instead. If you’re in California and your Jeep is 4x4 you’ll never need chains/cables anyway on the highway. Off-road chains might come in handy for sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Hijacking the thread for another question:

I noticed that the brake is less responsive in my 2020 trailhawk than the 2017 Laredo. In general it takes more travel for the brake pad in the TH to stop quickly. It does offer more resolution for brake control and smoother ride, but it does take some getting use to. I'm hoping this is normal for everyone?
My 2014 Limited had more responsive brakes than my 2018 Trailhawk. I wasn’t too pleased.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Congrats on your new Trailhawk. I have the exact same one as you, although, mine is a 2019 (so maybe it's not exactly the same). One thing different is the tires. I took the stock tires off ASAP - replaced them with Falken Wildpeak A/T 265/65R18 114T View attachment 221309 View attachment 221310
Mevans is right - there is no rubbing at all with the 265/65 that I have. Here's the difference between the 265 and the 275 tires. View attachment 221343
What effect did it have on your speedometer? Could you see a difference in gas mileage?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
With chains on? Just want to be sure as I’m likely to switch to this tire size. Thanks!
Cable chain type should be ok. I also need to get some of those just to carry most likely. If I put them on I would be sure to run in OR1 just in case.
What effect did it have on your speedometer? Could you see a difference in gas mileage?
Small effect on speedometer. If i recall, based on the speed displayed by gps on my radar detector, at 70 mph its maybe 1.5 - 2 mph slow. MPG probably dropped by 1 mpg though it's hard for me to be sure since I switched right at seasonal change to winter weather. Winter blend gas and colder temps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Just got a 2020 trailhawk with all the options myself...came in just in time for employee pricng. The brake does need to travel further than my 2014 overland. My only big complaint...it needed a new radiator at 100 miles! Dealer says a seam came undone...I was thinking WTF...how'd that happen? I've had JGCs for 20 years and this one sets a new record for going to the shop for repair. Anyway, hope it's an anomaly otherwise it's gone at the end of the lease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
With regards to snow traction of the OEM Goodyear AT Wrangler Kevlar Adventures: I have been very disappointed. Starting, stopping, and lateral traction are all less than I expected. Unsettling-so in some cases.

I picked up a lightly used 2019 Trailhawk Hemi last month (Dec 2019) with 15.5k miles on it to replace a 2017 BMW 430i Gran Coupe xDrive. I really expected a step change in traction compared to the bimmer. Honestly, I think the BMW is/was more well planted in the snow, even on the sporty Michelin all season tires it came with. (225/40R19 run-flat Primacy MXM4 ZP).

Which leads me to a related question and one I think the OP might also be interested in: Given that ice and snow traction is important to me (I'm in Minnesota), does anyone have an opinion about the extra 1/2 inch you get by going with a 275 width tire. (I'm on the fence between the 265/65/18, 275/60/18 and 275/65/18 Falken WildPeak)

B
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,796 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: IDoMy0wnRacing

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
With regards to snow traction of the OEM Goodyear AT Wrangler Kevlar Adventures: I have been very disappointed. Starting, stopping, and lateral traction are all less than I expected. Unsettling-so in some cases.

I picked up a lightly used 2019 Trailhawk Hemi last month (Dec 2019) with 15.5k miles on it to replace a 2017 BMW 430i Gran Coupe xDrive. I really expected a step change in traction compared to the bimmer. Honestly, I think the BMW is/was more well planted in the snow, even on the sporty Michelin all season tires it came with. (225/40R19 run-flat Primacy MXM4 ZP).

Which leads me to a related question and one I think the OP might also be interested in: Given that ice and snow traction is important to me (I'm in Minnesota), does anyone have an opinion about the extra 1/2 inch you get by going with a 275 width tire. (I'm on the fence between the 265/65/18, 275/60/18 and 275/65/18 Falken WildPeak)

B
A bit of research and I answered my own question. For Snow and Ice, wider is generally better. There is a great white paper from Scott Brady that goes into some detail.

What I was mistaken about is the availability of a Falken WildPeak A/T3W being available in 275/60/18. The 275/65/18 is available, but that tire pushes the 32 inch boundary (at 32.1"), so most likely not an option without some light mods in the front fender wells. (Unless spacers play a role here, but it is my understanding that spacers address the tire width, not the diameter.) Switching brands to something like the Yokohama AT or BFG K02 gets me to 285/60/18, but again... dicey on the clearance for width, and I push into an LT tire. Not sure that is necessary, or desired, considering the implications to ride comfort.

Doing a bit more research, but leaning pretty hard to the WildPeak 265/65/18.
Anyway... hope this contributes to the conversation.

Brian
 

·
Registered
2014 Summit 5.7 4wd 20" tires swapped to 18", added all skid plates
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
A bit of research and I answered my own question. For Snow and Ice, wider is generally better. There is a great white paper from Scott Brady that goes into some detail.

What I was mistaken about is the availability of a Falken WildPeak A/T3W being available in 275/60/18. The 275/65/18 is available, but that tire pushes the 32 inch boundary (at 32.1"), so most likely not an option without some light mods in the front fender wells. (Unless spacers play a role here, but it is my understanding that spacers address the tire width, not the diameter.) Switching brands to something like the Yokohama AT or BFG K02 gets me to 285/60/18, but again... dicey on the clearance for width, and I push into an LT tire. Not sure that is necessary, or desired, considering the implications to ride comfort.

Doing a bit more research, but leaning pretty hard to the WildPeak 265/65/18.
Anyway... hope this contributes to the conversation.

Brian
Why do you say wider is better for snow and ice? Most say narrower is better for snow and ice including the white paper you referenced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Why do you say wider is better for snow and ice? Most say narrower is better for snow and ice including the white paper you referenced.
If I read Scott’s paper correctly he states that softer surfaces (sand, snow) benefit from the floatation you get with a wider tire. I don’t recall him addressing ice, but I extrapolated that more sipes, more biting surface, is better.
Only talking 1/2 to 1 inch here, so probably splitting hairs.
Brian
 

·
Registered
2019 Grand Cherokee Altitude
Joined
·
82 Posts
You never want a tire to float on snow. You’ll get no traction. For this reason narrower tires are best for snow as they tend cut down to the roadway better.
 

·
Registered
2014 Summit 5.7 4wd 20" tires swapped to 18", added all skid plates
Joined
·
1,789 Posts
If I read Scott’s paper correctly he states that softer surfaces (sand, snow) benefit from the floatation you get with a wider tire. I don’t recall him addressing ice, but I extrapolated that more sipes, more biting surface, is better.
Only talking 1/2 to 1 inch here, so probably splitting hairs.
Brian
He does mention snow situations such as that but they are only when depth of snow it more than the ground clearance of the vehicle. That's the only time you want to "float" on snow. You can't sink in ice so you pretty much always want high contract pressure (narrow tires if you have a choice). That said, ice traction depends a whole lot on the actual temperature of the ice. In some conditions ice can have a usable amount of traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
He does mention snow situations such as that but they are only when depth of snow it more than the ground clearance of the vehicle. That's the only time you want to "float" on snow. You can't sink in ice so you pretty much always want high contract pressure (narrow tires if you have a choice). That said, ice traction depends a whole lot on the actual temperature of the ice. In some conditions ice can have a usable amount of traction.
Yeah... And I am mostly concerned with deeper snow. (Should have prefaced the snow-and-sand statement above with that concern to avoid confusion.)

All that said... I've clearly drifted into over-analysis at this point and need to reel it back in. o_O

Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
A bit of research and I answered my own question. For Snow and Ice, wider is generally better. There is a great white paper from Scott Brady that goes into some detail.

What I was mistaken about is the availability of a Falken WildPeak A/T3W being available in 275/60/18. The 275/65/18 is available, but that tire pushes the 32 inch boundary (at 32.1"), so most likely not an option without some light mods in the front fender wells. (Unless spacers play a role here, but it is my understanding that spacers address the tire width, not the diameter.) Switching brands to something like the Yokohama AT or BFG K02 gets me to 285/60/18, but again... dicey on the clearance for width, and I push into an LT tire. Not sure that is necessary, or desired, considering the implications to ride comfort.

Doing a bit more research, but leaning pretty hard to the WildPeak 265/65/18.
Anyway... hope this contributes to the conversation.

Brian
I can tell you right now switching to Wildpeaks on my Trailhawk is a world of difference, I went with 265/65/18 as well. I've been in snow/slush/mud up to the front bumper and it pushes right through. As I'm typing this I've watched 6-8in of snow come down in the PNW and driving my JGC with Wildpeaks is probably the most controlled vehicle I've ever driven in inclimate weather (and I've had many). The factory tires are borderline worthless for a vehicle of this caliber.
 

·
Registered
18 WK2 Trailhawk
Joined
·
524 Posts
Thank you all the information! Sounds like the spacers are really just for the looks and have nothing to do with clearance or larger tires. I'll stay away from those for now.



I mistyped when I asked about larger wheel size. I meant the tire size. If I swap out the stock tires, I'm torn between the different sizes (stock, 31.5", 32"). From what I read so far, 265/65r18 is a fairly safe option (other than small speedometer error). I feel like on the TH, 1-1.5" larger tire is 80% look and 20% ground clearance. But I still want it!
You can also go with a 255/70/18 instead of the 275/65/18. The 255 is still 32.1 tall but a little more narrow then the 275s. I had 275/65/18 Duratracs on my 2017 Trailhawk, they rubbed a little, and now I run the 255/70/18 Cooper AT3 4S on my 2018 Trailhawk. The 255s barely rub at all, mostly when turning in entry mode. The 32s are roughly a 5% speedo/odo error.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
You can also go with a 255/70/18 instead of the 275/65/18. The 255 is still 32.1 tall but a little more narrow then the 275s. I had 275/65/18 Duratracs on my 2017 Trailhawk, they rubbed a little, and now I run the 255/70/18 Cooper AT3 4S on my 2018 Trailhawk. The 255s barely rub at all, mostly when turning in entry mode. The 32s are roughly a 5% speedo/odo error.
There are multiple ways to level the QL now (links, AlfaOBD, etc.) and raising it even a half inch in the front negates any rubbing in the typical 32" tire size.
 
21 - 40 of 68 Posts
Top