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Well, count me in the tranny/condeser leaking club. I noticed the belly pan was wet a few weeks ago. Tonight, I popped the hood to check it, and the puddling was much larger. I looked under the Jeep, and sure enough, there was drip spots on the garage floor. The color is reddish, so it's most assuredly the transmission cooler.

I got a quote of 785 out the door, from Firestone Complete Autocare. What have the rest of you paid?
 

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Update... Got the condenser replaced in my '11 WK2. Started dripping heavily after making an emergency trip to Wichita (400 miles round trip)... about a 3" spot on my driveway overnight. Dealer charged $1100... but my Mopar warranty covered it for $100. Took about 5 hours labor and had the part overnighted.. but had the Jeep back by mid afternoon the next day. It doesn't even appear that they removed the bumper cover... but maybe they did. Not bad at all in my opinion. Thanks Carthage Dodge in Carthage, MO. They did a great job and know how to treat customers!

Absolutely no leaks since the install. It even seems to be shifting and accellerating quieter and smoother. Might have been a bit low on fluid... but all is definitely good now!

I absolutely love the thing!
I am having the same problem, but the dealer is telling me this isn't covered under the Powertrain Warranty.

Any thoughts?
 

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This has happened on mine twice now. The first time it actually was covered under warranty. Then, just 40k miles later, I had to foot the bill. Aggravating.
 

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I just had my leaking trans cooler replaced by the dealer on my 13 Overland Summit V6 at 81K miles. My cost was $839.73 (the Power Train Warranty does not cover and the dealer and Jeep Warranty Customer service both declined to pay anything towards it). My receipt states "Replaced AC Condenser/Trans Cooler/Recover EVAC and Recharge AC System". I am now getting the weird Whooomp sound from the AC relief valve or AC compressor that was mentioned here on another thread. Does the Trans Cooler use the same Coolant that the AC does? I am following up with the dealer to warn them of this sound that started after they worked on it just to cover my butt. The other thread mentions either an over or under fill of coolant or an AC compressor/AC Condenser/AC relief valve failure causing the sound.
The combination radiators are just 2 radiators built together as one, or a single radiator with a divider and separate hookups to cool two different systems.

They do not mix the fluids, they simply are two radiators separate as far as the fluid circulating through them is concerned, but mounted together as one unit.

The AC Condenser part will have refrigerant (R-134a) with PAG oil mixed in it circulating through it.

The Trans Cooler part will have Transmission Fluid circulating through it.

So obviously the problem with that is, if one part of the radiator springs a leak, then you have to replace the whole thing. And in the case of a transmission leak, that means you have de-service and re-service the AC, which is expensive/PIA and beyond what most DIY'er can do. Not to mention, opening up an AC system, if you make a mistake, don't know what your doing, you could damage it.

If you de-serviced the AC system properly, then you wouldn't have lost any AC oil. When you replace the AC Condenser a certain amount of the AC oil will be trapped in the AC Condenser and will need to replaced when servicing the system. The exact amount should be stipulated in the Service Manual. As well, while the system is apart and exposed to air and humidity, for more than a few minutes, it should be capped off. And if open for more than a few minutes the Filter/Drier should be replaced to assure the desiccant in the Drier has NOT been contaminated by the atmosphere. Then a true vacuum has to be drawn on the system for at least a half hour to remove any air and or moisture in the system, before servicing it with new refrigerant. If these things weren't done, damage could have been done to the AC and/or the life of the AC system significantly shortened.

If you add too much oil to an AC system it can slug and/or damage the valves or compressor in the AC system, the oil is suppose to mix with the refrigerant and circulate through the system with the refrigerant. If there is too much oil, it won't mix and get pushed through the system as a stream of oil rushing through the lines, that could make a whoosh noise. As it forced past valves or damages the valves, they make whale song noises.

If this AC noise started just after the combination AC Condenser/Trans Cooler Replacement, then its extremely likely the Dealership did something wrong and caused the AC to malfunction. Most AC systems require expensive repairs, so you want to get this on record right away if its a dealership as you try to resolve this, cause its likely the Dealership's responsibility.
 

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Hey there all, noob here! And like the rest of you, my tranny cooler/a-c condenser has been pissing atf all over everywhere! My question is this....taking OEM out of the equation, what "brand" cooler would you guys recommend as a replacement? I've seen various brands on Ebay and Amazon and Rock Auto...but really, this day and age and with technology being what it is....is one really better than the other? Thanks in advance!
 

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I have a 2013 GC with 140K miles and am having my third condenser go in today. The first was under warranty, I did the second myself and I'm having a shop replace this one today. These things appear to be disposable.
 

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I used the TYC 3893 Replacement Condenser through Amazon. Price was right and worked well for the remainder of the time I had that Jeep.
 

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He's confusing the fluids and principles of operation for the different systems.....

The Engine have a separate cooling system, that seperate cooling system uses Coolant, its made up of water and anti-freeze. Its called coolant because its only function is to cool the engine.

The Transmission performs hydraulic operations, using ATF+4 that is a variant of hydraulic fluid, to cool it the transmission just pumps its lubricating and hydraulic fluid through the Trans Cooler to cool it and thus cool the transmission. The trans fluid does multiple things, including cooling, but its not coolant its the primary working fluid for the trans....

AC gets complicated, the working fluid is called refrigerant, it is for cooling because all the AC does is cool, it works off the principal of thermodynamics of expanding/compressing gases and phases changes of the working fluid..... ....the condenser is for cooling the refrigerant after it heats up from compressing it, as well as condensing (that's why its called a condenser) the refrigerant to a liquid by cooling it..... .....so the refrigerant (R-134a) is the working fluid, not some independent coolant.... ....but yes, since the only thing the AC does is cool, you wouldn't be wrong calling it coolant either.....

So none of these Heat Exchangers (a.k.a. Radiator, Trans Cooler, Condenser) use the same fluid, they all have the primary fluid of the system, the working fluid, running through them, EXCEPT the engine, that uses anti-freeze and water as an independent coolant.......

As well, there is a small Power Steering Cooler tacked on in front of the Trans Cooler/Condenser, it is the just the Power Steering fluid being pumped through the heat exchanger (PS Cooler) that is being cooled and thus cools all the Power Steering Parts.....
 

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Changing the Condenser/Trans Cooler is something an any independent shop can do, and likely an AC Shop might be best.... ....since the AC will require recharging after its complete.....

There is no reason to pay the Dealer's Premium Price for inferior service to get this changed, it doesn't require the Dealer only special tools or electronics.... ...it just requires AC tools to recharge the AC....

And after dissing the Dealer, there are good ones out there, its just sad that it seems the bad ones way out number the good ones today...... Changing this component should not cost $1000 or even $850.....
 

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Is there any reason why you couldn't just add an aftermarket transmission cooler and bypass the embedded cooler altogether? It seems like there would be room to stack it above little power steering cooler in front of the condenser.
 

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Is there any reason why you couldn't just add an aftermarket transmission cooler and bypass the embedded cooler altogether? It seems like there would be room to stack it above little power steering cooler in front of the condenser.
Other than having to research exactly the cooling capacity needed, finding an aftermarket trans cooler of the capacity, shape and size to fit, then improvise the mounting and hose connections (which likely will require special tools) and then take the risk it might be less reliable or not work as well, NO, there is no reason at all you couldn't just add a trans cooler in replace of the OEM....

Expect the Dealer and many shops will refuse to do it. Do not judge a cooler by its shape or size, there are all sorts of technical innovations over the years that have lead to far more effective and efficient cooling. A cheap aftermarket cooler of the same size may be woefully inadequate in cooling capacity....

Not saying it can't be done, I'm saying, to do it right will require more than just grabbing any cooler off the shelf and slapping it on in front of the existing cooler. As well, more risk, even if you do a ton of research it might result in missing something and it not working effectively and you'll need to do the job all over again......
 

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Is there any reason why you couldn't just add an aftermarket transmission cooler and bypass the embedded cooler altogether? It seems like there would be room to stack it above little power steering cooler in front of the condenser.
As Mongo said, while there may be room, for the amount of effort required, it's easier to just replace it as an assembly. Once you start modifying the factory fittings, you're just digging the money hole deeper.
 

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As Mongo said, while there may be room, for the amount of effort required, it's easier to just replace it as an assembly. Once you start modifying the factory fittings, you're just digging the money hole deeper.
I see your point, and Mongo's. And now I understand that aftermarket coolers are intended to be used inline in addition to whatever factory cooler is in use. Still, it seems a shame to have to crack open the AC system, and I assume replace the AC dryer, pull a vacuum, etc, to replace it.
 

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I see your point, and Mongo's. And now I understand that aftermarket coolers are intended to be used inline in addition to whatever factory cooler is in use. Still, it seems a shame to have to crack open the AC system, and I assume replace the AC dryer, pull a vacuum, etc, to replace it.
Oh I agree. The dryer comes as part of the condensor. The worst part of the repair is as you mentioned, the AC side of things. Aside from having to evac and recharge the AC, the job is pretty simple.
 
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