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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon everyone.

I’m looking to potentially purchase a 2018 or 2019 grand Cherokee either the Overland or Summit addition. What I would like to find out is, are there any known issues I should be aware of before purchasing?
How reliable is the air ride on these?

thank you!
 

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2019 WK2 High Altitude w/ 5.7 Hemi
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I bought a 2019 new and at about 6K miles had the compressor go bad. It was obviously under warranty, so it was replaced at no charge. I think it would have been about a $2k repair. That GC unfortunately got totaled, but I bought another 2019 with no hesitation; partly due to how well it protected me and my daughter during the crash. Also, upgraded to a HEMI which I had regretted on the new one. My only recommendation it to be sure it has MaxCare that can be transferred, or purchase your own MaxCare warranty.
 

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2017 GC Trailhawk
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Go with the 2019, the 2018 has a screen delaminating issue that isn’t covered once warranty is expired.

plus the screen is nicer on a 2019.
 

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2018 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
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There are a lot of threads covering this at the moment, so it's worth a search. Outside of what is considered standard equipment, the 2018-present models are pretty much identical.

FWIW, there is no significant difference in image quality (outside of the delamination issue) between the 2018 and 2019 screens. Personally, I hate the piano black on the 2019+ models and I purposely sought out a 2018 because of it. But I also have a very extended warranty, so I don't care too much about it if something goes wrong.

Obviously Quadra-Lift may, at some point down the road, become an issue. Some people have 150k and no problems, other people have replaced shocks and the pump at 50k. I think by and large, it's a reliable system, but they churned out hundreds of WK2s a day for years, so problems are obviously bound to pop up for some people. The ZF 8 speed is solid, and neither the later Hemis nor the Pentastar have many issues (think of how many of them FCA/Stellantis has built to date).

The higher optioned (Overland and Summit) models DO have leather dashes that seem to have a lot of problems and Jeep is less than stellar about dealing with them if you're out of warranty. I personally would avoid these trims for this reason alone. Regardless of what you choose, I think the WK2 has, at least, average reliability for it's class but I'd also strongly suggest an extended warranty/service contract if something does go wrong. Mopar's coverage or Carmax's coverage (requires buying it from there) are both good choices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you very much for information!
I will keep an eye out for that warranty. I should be test driving the first car tomorrow morning.
Regarding the air suspension, does it make a big enough difference and ride quality over their base set up?
Also, (this is random). Are there any windshield wiper noise issues on these cars? I’ll be trading in my 2016 Mercedes GLE 350 which has constant wiper noise issues that Mercedes claims they can’t fix...

Thanks again!
 

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2018 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
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It's been years since I drove a non-QL WK2, but I do remember the conventional suspension version to not be as composed, nor as comfortable on long trips. I took a Limited without air suspension on a 800+ mile trip back in 2017 and came away unimpressed. Last month my fiance and I drove 1200+ miles in my Trailhawk and loved every minute of it. No car ass, no hurting back, no exhaustion. Granted the TH also has significantly better seats than a base Limited, but who knows.

It doesn't rain here much (especially not lately), but I haven't noticed any weird noises coming from the wipers and I'm usually pretty sensitive to that sort of thing. They're relatively quiet.

The WK2's underpinnings were originally largely derived from/heavily inspired by the GLE's platform so I'm interested what kind of similarities and differences you notice in driving dynamics.
 

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2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit 3.6L 4x2
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We had a 2014 Overland 4x4 with QL and traded it in for a 2020 Summit 4x2 with regular springs.
The 2020 ride is excellent, we just returned from a 2000 mile road trip and loved the ride.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
We had a 2014 Overland 4x4 with QL and traded it in for a 2020 Summit 4x2 with regular springs.
The 2020 ride is excellent, we just returned from a 2000 mile road trip and loved the ride.
Thanks for sharing.
Is there any difference in the ride quality from 2018 to 2020? I would think it would all basically be the same, would it not?
 

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2018 Trailhawk
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I don't think the geometry had changed, but they did start using cast aluminum suspension parts to save weight. I think my 2018 rides better than my 2014 did (both QL). The main difference between the two was the aluminum suspension parts AFAIK.
 

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2020 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summit 3.6L 4x2
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They also changed the sway bar link attachment points on the later front suspension.
We both like the regular spring suspension ride. It seems to be a tad smoother over expansion joints. We usually towed with our 2014 and the QL handled it very well. We do not tow with our 2020, just use it for road trips.
It does sway more in sharp turns but not terribly so....
 

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I love my 2019, no regrets at all with it. Only issue it's had (that wasn't caused by me, anyways) was an AC compressor leak, which got fixed under warranty. Every other issue (suspension noises mostly) has been a direct result of something I did :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So I test drove the 2018 this morning and I personally was not impressed with the ride. It didn’t seem like there there really was in air suspension just like a normal spring suspension ride. There was nothing floaty or smooth about it. (Yes, it did have the air ride suspension before you ask).
Does it automatically adjust itself or is there a setting that’s preferred??
 

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I do not believe this is a permanent situation...there are issues with parts including the "chips" that are required to install the system. Rather than have nothing to sell, I believe Jeep decided to temporarily build some Overland and Summit JGC-L (3-row) vehicles with the spring suspension to not exacerbate the new vehicle supply problem.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Question: I just found a thread on the form that stated that the high altitude air suspension ride was more tuned for sport. The high altitude model is what I drove yesterday. Is it true that it drives firmer than a standard Overland or Summit? If so, then I may choose to take a look at a Overland today and see if there’s a difference
 

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Question: I just found a thread on the form that stated that the high altitude air suspension ride was more tuned for sport. The high altitude model is what I drove yesterday. Is it true that it drives firmer than a standard Overland or Summit? If so, then I may choose to take a look at a Overland today and see if there’s a difference
No, there is no difference in the "tuning" of the suspension from other trim levels. HA is an Overland that uses Summit fascias and has some other visual things...appearance, in other words.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I drove the 19’ Overland this morning and there is a BIG difference between it and the high altitude. It Road almost as well as my Mercedes, if not the same. So there definitely has to be a difference between the two vehicles somehow..
 

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I drove the 19’ Overland this morning and there is a BIG difference between it and the high altitude. It Road almost as well as my Mercedes, if not the same. So there definitely has to be a difference between the two vehicles somehow..
It could be the individual vehicle, but an HA "is" and Overland...that's why there are sometimes issues with getting body parts numbers because an HA VIN shows in the system as an Overland.
 

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2018 Trailhawk
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A lot depends on the wheels and tires too. Rims and tires account for the majority of the unsprung weight of the vehicle and a few pounds can make a difference in ride quality. Bigger weight differences can account for differences in handling, performance, and fuel economy. Just my $0.02 on the issue.

I just changed tires on my Trailhawk and it rides completely different. Went from stock Goodyear AT to Cooper AT tires and the ride is night and day.
 
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