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Discussion Starter #1
i apologize if this has been covered already. i did a couple of searches and wound up with nothing.

curious if anyone has any solid info if the '14 diesel GCs will have the unlimited / unlimited max care package available. when we put our order in for one id like to know before we get to that part of negotiating the deal.

thanks in advance. :)
 

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The Chrysler plans online do not have max care for Diesels.

"Chrysler Lifetime Warranty

2007 and newer Chrysler vehicles could qualify for a Lifetime Powertrain warranty or upgrade to a full bumper-to-bumper Lifetime warranty. Viper, all SRT vehicles, Sprinter, Ram Cab/Chassis, diesel equipped vehicles and some non-personel use vehicles are excluded. "
 

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I tried to get this with my ram, and at first they said i could get it and then they told me diesels are excluded also....would be nice!
 

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That would be awesome if its available fir the gc srt, definitely worth it...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i know you cant get it with the big diesel trucks, but im curious if the statement above will include the new 3.0 or not. anyone? anyone? buller?
 

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Go to this site: http://chrysler-warranty-online.com/chrysler-warranty-information
If you call and talk to Trish she will answer all your questions. If she doesn't have an answer, she will offer to call Chrysler and find out. Very helpful, and pleasant to deal with. This is not a paid advertisement, I'm just a regular joe who called and was impressed with her knowledge and helpfulness.
 

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They dont cover diesel because diesels will always clog up around 60K miles and will need one of all of the following replaced: Intake Manifold, EGR Valve, Diesel Particulate Filter, Exhaust Manifold+turbo.

Its a common issue with all modern diesels.

The cost of upgrading to the diesel 4500 plus the cost of repair when these items go out of warranty, which they will really brings this option to over 9K.

Just get the V6 and save yourself the headache 6 years down the road.

If money is not an option, get the diesel.

If you do a lot of day to day short trips, avoid the diesel as you will clog that entire exhaust system up real quick.

Who would cover this when its designed to fail at a certain point.
 

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I have driven diesel pickup trucks for 20+ years. Ford F250's. the engine always outlasts the truck itself. I have never experienced any of the problems listed above. Vanguard, do you have experience with the Fiat or Mercedes engines that lead to this?
 

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I have driven diesel pickup trucks for 20+ years. Ford F250's. the engine always outlasts the truck itself. I have never experienced any of the problems listed above. Vanguard, do you have experience with the Fiat or Mercedes engines that lead to this?

Those Diesel pickups did not have to meet new pollution requirements.

Small passengers cars in the around 2005 had a whole new batch of regulations adding in the EGR valves and DPF which are the culprits behind all the destruction and carbon deposition.

A diesel without a DPF and EGR valve is great...but illegal now a days.

They reduce emissions a boat load (not really, since the DPF just dumps everything out at once instead of all the time, but hey all that matters is what happens during the inspection! lol) but have a serious detrimental toll on your intake and exhaust manifolds.
 

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Just google "EGR and DPF problems" and you will see the havok they cause. Most people get them blank and retune the car's ECU to bypass them.

From the looks of it, this jeep comes with an EGR, DPS, Urea cycle with injectors, and swirl flaps on the intake manifold.

Usually the EGR is the first to go, clogging up and sending more soot into the intake manifold. This will lock up the swirl flaps and eventually cause it to read a fault in the engine. Since compression and fuel air mixture will be crap, the DPF will clog up and your car will go into limp mode, until you shut it off and restart it. It will drive ok a few miles and it will happen again. Many of these things go UNNOTICED if you drive short distances to work everyday...eventually all this pressure will cause a nice split down your exhaust manifold and take the turbo along with it.

Its a viscous cycle.

Ive owned 2 diesel passenger cars both after 2005 model year and both had the problems. One was a 2006 1.9 CDTI Opel which needed a new intake, exhaust and EGR, the other was a 2009 3.0 Audi A6 which needed a new DPF.

This was all when I lived in europe for 6 years, Luckily, the mechanics there are all to aware of these diesel problems and find used parts relatively cheap.

Needless to say, I will never buy another diesel again. If you want fuel efficiency, take the small 4 cyl turbo in a car. If you need power, take the v8.

Once I did a 400 dollar ECU tune on my OPEL completely blanking the EGR and DPF, it drove very well and never had another problem.
 

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Just google "EGR and DPF problems" and you will see the havok they cause. Most people get them blank and retune the car's ECU to bypass them.

From the looks of it, this jeep comes with an EGR, DPS, Urea cycle with injectors, and swirl flaps on the intake manifold.

Usually the EGR is the first to go, clogging up and sending more soot into the intake manifold. This will lock up the swirl flaps and eventually cause it to read a fault in the engine. Since compression and fuel air mixture will be crap, the DPF will clog up and your car will go into limp mode, until you shut it off and restart it. It will drive ok a few miles and it will happen again. Many of these things go UNNOTICED if you drive short distances to work everyday...eventually all this pressure will cause a nice split down your exhaust manifold and take the turbo along with it.

Its a viscous cycle.

Ive owned 2 diesel passenger cars both after 2005 model year and both had the problems. One was a 2006 1.9 CDTI Opel which needed a new intake, exhaust and EGR, the other was a 2009 3.0 Audi A6 which needed a new DPF.

This was all when I lived in europe for 6 years, Luckily, the mechanics there are all to aware of these diesel problems and find used parts relatively cheap.

Needless to say, I will never buy another diesel again. If you want fuel efficiency, take the small 4 cyl turbo in a car. If you need power, take the v8.

Once I did a 400 dollar ECU tune on my OPEL completely blanking the EGR and DPF, it drove very well and never had another problem.
how many miles for a commute does it need to properly cycle? 10-15?
 

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One of the chrysler discount warranty sites posted in another thread had the max care available for the CRD. You could pick 7yr/100k but could not pick lifetime if diesel was selected.
 

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Is the quadra-lift air suspension covered under the max care unlimited?
 

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Back in 2008, Chrysler sold a 5-year/85,000 mile warranty for the CRD. I had the swirl valve replaced under that warranty as well as the transmission control module which isn't specific to the CRD. I drive longer trips and haven't had any problems with the DPF in 119,000 miles so far.
 

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If I plan on keeping my '14 for a longggg time, I'm definitely going to invest in a warranty for the quadra-lift. I'm thinking that's going to be first to fail.
 
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