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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi

Just coming up to the 40k service and need to source oil for both the front rear axle/diffs.

The front is specified
Mopar® Gear and Axle Lubricant 75W-85
Mopar p/n 05136035AA


I am not sure of the Quanitity but am pretty confident that 2 litres / quarts would be more than enough.

For the Rear ELSD, the oil specified is different.
Mopar® Gear and Axle Lubricant 75W-85 with Modifier
Mopar p/n 68083381AA


Again I am not sure of the Quanitity but am pretty confident that 2 litres / quarts would be more than enough.

Has anybody been down the road to source the same or to import? My dealer wants about $112 per litre.
 

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My 3.0 CRD Owners manual says on page 299 that unless I have a Hemi 5.7 the correct diff oil front and rear is 75w - 140 with a friction modifier, I at least hope it is right because I just bought 4 litres ($99.00) from Auto-One, the elsd diff is only listed for the rear of the 5.7 and it requires 75w-85 with no mention of a friction modifier?
I am now wondering if there is differing versions of the operating information manual.
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #3
I was actually going by what was listed on WK2Jeeps.

Jeep Grand Cherokee WK2 - Maintenance information and schedules

But it is a good point about whats in the manual.

In my manual which is on page 299 it says SAE75W-140 with the friction modifier and because mine has the ELSD, 75W-90 without the modifier on the rear, which doesn't make sense. I would have expected that the ELSD would have the friction modifier.

So, not sure what to do about this one.....
 

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Yes I agree, the other unusual aspect of all this is you would imagine the SAE75W - 140 to be of more use as its temperature range if far greater and it is a full synthetic, 75, well we probably dont get it that cold here but the 140 would be very good in extreme hot conditions, under which the diffs could find themselves subject to while working offroad or in sand. I dont know why the electronic LSD uses standard oil.
 

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Jeep Grand Cherokee
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I was actually going by what was listed on WK2Jeeps.

Jeep Grand Cherokee WK2 - Maintenance information and schedules

But it is a good point about whats in the manual.

In my manual which is on page 299 it says SAE75W-140 with the friction modifier and because mine has the ELSD, 75W-90 without the modifier on the rear, which doesn't make sense. I would have expected that the ELSD would have the friction modifier.

So, not sure what to do about this one.....
My manual is the same. This is bizarre. It has to be a mistake. But who do we ask? Chrysler will only refer us to the dealers and the dealers wouldn't have a bloody clue and couldn't care less. The thing is, if the ELSD doesn't have friction modifiers and the right friction modifiers, it is likely to work more like an open diff. This would be almost undetectable other than noticing that one is getting bogged a little more often than before.
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #6
I downloaded and checked one of the American owners manuals today and they had the same diff oil spec as our Australian ones.

So based on that, I think I will go with whats in our owners manual.

I did PM Milous on it but have not heard back.

Just realised that my paid membership has expired so that maybe why he hasn't replied. Or it just could be that we are spoilt by having overnight answers from Milous :)
 
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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #7
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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #8
Actually

I just downloaded the Edition 6 of the 2012 manual from Jeep US sites. They now have all diff oils at 75W-85 GL5 , ELSD with friction modifier.
 
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Just realized that my paid membership has expired so that maybe why he hasn't replied. Or it just could be that we are spoilt by having overnight answers from Milous :)
Na, nothing to do with your membership status, sorry for missing your PM, try to respond to them all but get quite a volume of them...
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #10
No probs, Was really only in jest.....
 

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Jeep Grand Cherokee
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Actually

I just downloaded the Edition 6 of the 2012 manual from Jeep US sites. They now have all diff oils at 75W-85 GL5 , ELSD with friction modifier.
That makes a lot of sense. :thumbsup: for sorting it out.
 

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O.K. , had my 40,000km service performed today, I was worried about the front and rear diff oil I purchased prior as after reading this thread it became apparent that the book was wrong ( or so we thought ), what if the book is right and it is 75w 140 that is the ideal oil for these diffs?, well thats what the service technician told me, he said that they put 75w 85 in as it will do with additives, it is because it is a lot more cost effective, you see the 75w 140 is full synthetic and in the Mopar range 1 litre costs approx $100.00, my car took approx 2.3 litres for both diffs, again approx $230.00 worth, so you see it makes sense to use the it will do oil as its much cheaper?
If someone out there is a chemist or has any idea on the benifits or lack thereoff it would be benificial, the technician said the 140 synthetic was better by far as it covered all and any heat situation I may encounter from towing, beaching, low range 4w4ing etc, thats his take on it and I paid him for the job.
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #13
The Redline 75W85 is also fully synthetic, also comes with additives and there is also a 75W85 in the Mopar range as well.

Not sure whether it makes a difference, possibly a little in economy but I don't know how that could be measured.

I'm comfortable with the 75W-85 as that is what is in the Latest 2012 manual and also in Jeeps 2012 fluid specs.

Like I said, I don't think it makes a massive amount of difference.
 

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The Redline 75W85 is also fully synthetic, also comes with additives and there is also a 75W85 in the Mopar range as well.

Not sure whether it makes a difference, possibly a little in economy but I don't know how that could be measured.

I'm comfortable with the 75W-85 as that is what is in the Latest 2012 manual and also in Jeeps 2012 fluid specs.

Like I said, I don't think it makes a massive amount of difference.
Yes you are right, it is though a lesson in the many products available and the marketing of them, it also gets down to opions and individuals at the various dealerships around the world, it shows no matter the expertise we will on accations have differences, probably a indicator of the times we live in.
 

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Jeep Grand Cherokee
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This is my opinion based on only what has been said before in this thread. The 75W-85 oil would seem the most appropriate oil for the Jeep in its normal configuration as an SUV. This should give the best ballance of lubricity and fuel economy. However, if used in extreme conditions such as high temperatures, heavy towing or sustained high speed, then 75W-140 might be appropriate. It would be good if Jeep gave us a little more guidance on this. OK, it's hardly a deal breaker but still...
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #16
Unfortunately at some dealers, they simply do not stock all the required oil types and specs for all the various models. So whatever they have in that "big drum out the back" is what you get.

Yes it's a shame that we can't just check with Jeep Aust tech department. I tried that when I noticed that the engine oil quantity in the manual was wrong. They come back and said that 9.6 litres as stated in the manual is correct when it has been proven wrong, so zero confidence on those guys.
 

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Jeep Grand Cherokee
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Unfortunately at some dealers, they simply do not stock all the required oil types and specs for all the various models. So whatever they have in that "big drum out the back" is what you get.

Yes it's a shame that we can't just check with Jeep Aust tech department. I tried that when I noticed that the engine oil quantity in the manual was wrong. They come back and said that 9.6 litres as stated in the manual is correct when it has been proven wrong, so zero confidence on those guys.
Fancy me defending Chrysler but in this case they are probably right. The 9.6L would be for a dry engine. That is, if you totally rebuilt your engine then added oil. There are so many places where oil gets hung up. It clings to all surfaces as it is designed to do, it pools on horizontal surfaces particularly the very bottom of the sump which never really drains properly. Then there is the oil filter, oil pump, oil cooler and oil ducts of which there are many. It doesn't help when the mechanic leaves your car for a while to cool so he doesn't burn is fingers on the sump plug. By that time time the oil has cooled and thickened. Then how long does he leave it to drain? Not long I expect. It is quite normal for oil change qualities to be quite a bit less that the engines oil capacity.
 

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Jeep SRT
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Hi Bob,
I doubt there would be 1.2lt of oil left in the motor after a filter & oil change change.
At most I would think maybe 200ml, as there are a few low spots in the heads and such that could hold a small amount, but 1200ml is a lot of oil.
I would think there is a typo and it should be 8.6l not 9.6l.
Having done 3 oil & filter changes, I cannot see where the extra oil is hiding.
 

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MY12 JGC Overland
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Discussion Starter #19
I suspect that the 9.6 was a carry over from the previous manual and Merc engine...
 
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