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Fixed it for you...

Just wanted to throw in my .02. I have a 2019 Trailhawk with front and rear LED lights, except for the stupid turn signals in the rear: they elected to use incandescent for whatever reason. Threw in two LEDS, and I've not had a single issue with hyperflash, didn't need resistors, either. Am wondering if maybe the Luxury Group II has a reprogramed BCM that monitors for a wider range of resistance, instead of needing the typical 6ohm resistors to simulate a incandescent. Just wanted to pass it along :)
Miniature bulbs like 3157 are just plain old incandescent (like household bulbs) and not halogen.
 

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Just wanted to throw in my .02. I have a 2019 Trailhawk with front and rear LED lights, except for the stupid turn signals in the rear: they elected to use incandescent for whatever reason. Threw in two LEDS, and I've not had a single issue with hyperflash, didn't need resistors, either. Am wondering if maybe the Luxury Group II has a reprogramed BCM that monitors for a wider range of resistance, instead of needing the typical 6ohm resistors to simulate an incandescent. Just wanted to pass it along :)
Your pretty much right. i believe after 2016 the computer was changed a bit and didnt have as many issues when people would swap out to led. However there are some vehicles from earlier models that dont have any issues either and some have to use resistors. Its kinda luck of the draw. However there are ways you can change the settings in the jeep if you have to proper software to accept led bulbs and not have any warning lights when it sees a lower resistance.
 

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2019 JGC Trailhawk
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2019 Trailhawk with front and rear LED lights, except for the stupid turn signals in the rear: they elected to use incandescent for whatever reason. Threw in two LEDS, and I've not had a single issue with hyperflash, didn't need resistors, either. Am wondering if maybe the Luxury Group II has a reprogramed BCM that monitors for a wider range of resistance, instead of needing the typical 6ohm resistors to simulate an incandescent. Just wanted to pass it along :)
^ Can confirm this. Replaced all bulbs in the back with Alla LED bulbs including brake lights and all work perfectly. The brake / indicator lights do not hyper flash.

Also, FYI, every bulb I've replaced inside and out on my 2019 Trailhawk has been an incandescent bulb, including every bulb in the rear.
 

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Also, FYI, every bulb I've replaced inside and out on my 2019 Trailhawk has been an incandescent bulb, including every bulb in the rear.
If you have the luxury group II, the only incandescents outside are tail light backups and turn/brakes. However, I'm curious to know: how did you replace the LED interior lights above the rear passenger seats? I've been unable to find a way to replace them without actually removing the board and resoldering a different color temp LED to it.
 

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If you have the luxury group II, the only incandescents outside are tail light backups and turn/brakes. However, I'm curious to know: how did you replace the LED interior lights above the rear passenger seats? I've been unable to find a way to replace them without actually removing the board and resoldering a different color temp LED to it.
 

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Yeah for sure. The biggest reason why I've not upgraded all of the incans (other than the rear tailgate and front puddle lights, etc) to 5000K is because it'll look super silly to have the fronts/courtesy bulbs be a pure white while the second row passengers are still that yellow, so I figure: why not keep it all the same for now, I upgraded what I can with 4000K Phillips LEDs, seems to be subtle enough that it doesn't look TOO different from the factory LED boards in the rear.

Rumor is that the latest Vipers had a more 5500K LED setup and they are direct plug/play to these boards in the trailhawks, but good luck finding them, especially now. =(
 

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For your records, this is the closest I've gotten to getting the LED's. Assuming they aren't "serviceable" so finding parts may prove more difficult, but I've been trying to get my hands no a PN for a month now without success.

 

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Discussion Starter #111
I was able to grab a photo to show beam pattern. This was on a dark stretch of I-90 and it’s low beam only.

IMG_4598.JPG
 

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Discussion Starter #112
Part of the equation for LED bulbs is proper indexing, which makes a big difference.

Another factor is how the led chip disperses light. No led chip headlight is throwing a 180° beam, but some come close at about 170-175° or so. Since they fire left & right (ideal orientation is firing horizontally) you’re left with a max possible of maybe 340-350° of output, versus 360° with halogen. HID has just shy of a 360° output because of the wire in the element, but it’s closer.

Compound the led chip output with the design of the led bulb carrier and you can find diminished output there too. I was just discussing this via phone with a new friend from the forum. Below you’ll see the Lumen led bulb from CarID and below that the VLEDS Micro Evolution bulb. Notice how the VLEDS chips sit on the surface of the shaft, which allows the light to achieve its maximum possible output, in this case about 340-350°. The Lumen bulb has chips that are sunken into the shaft of the bulb, so they cannot possibly provide the same 340–350° output, as they must contend with that metal surround that blocks light to the side. Looking at the bezels around the led chip, let’s estimate a loss of maybe 20° in either direction, giving maybe 150° on each side or 300° total of the possible 360° output.

It stands to reason that this will affect the beam as it meets the ground.


LUMEN -



VLEDS -

 
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