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Hi all, just got my first Grand Cherokee, a 2019 Limited, a few months back but came with traditional halogen projector headlamps and I’m looking to upgrade them to the HID/Bi-Xenon headlamps. Anyone have any product recommendations/sites for making this switch? Is it worth the cost to switch?
 

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Ebay has some options, and I know there are a couple of shops selling the kits. Here's one: MHFAutoLighting. You'll need the harness and the lights...not cheap but doable.
 

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plenty of posts on here about this topic but ill tell you i did my headlamp swap myself , bought the lights off ebay they werent perfect but fixable. If you try and find a perfect set you'll pay for it. My one light had a missing tab on the lower side which was okay since the other two hold it in well enough plus the plastic bracket that also installs with it. Other light had a small crack in it that i sealed up. Total for both lights for me was $650 + $499 for the wire harness to get them to work like oem. One of my best upgrades and mods ive done.
 

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plenty of posts on here about this topic but ill tell you i did my headlamp swap myself , bought the lights off ebay they werent perfect but fixable. If you try and find a perfect set you'll pay for it. My one light had a missing tab on the lower side which was okay since the other two hold it in well enough plus the plastic bracket that also installs with it. Other light had a small crack in it that i sealed up. Total for both lights for me was $650 + $499 for the wire harness to get them to work like oem. One of my best upgrades and mods ive done.
Would you recommend this full headlamp swap over saving some money and just replacing all the bulbs with LEDs ?
 

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Would you recommend this full headlamp swap over saving some money and just replacing all the bulbs with LEDs ?
Have you considered Sylvania Silverstar Ultra bulbs? You need the "Ultra" model, not one of the other models of silverstar bulbs.... ...there are several that are even higher color temp but don't light the road as well as the "Ultra" that lights them the best at a very high color temp.....

The problem with LED's is that they are not DOT Approved and thus not street legal.....
The same is true with the signal and park lamps, but cops and inspectors don't bother with those lamps unless you've got a really bad combination of LED Bulb and light fixture that just doesn't work right.....

I've gone back and forth over the LED Headlamp bulbs, clearly some are not up to snuff, either not bright enough or don't achieve the correct focus of the beam, there are couple out on the market now that do seem to produce a brighter, higher color temperature, a good 6500k, beam in focus..... ....they also advertised about 1.5-2 times the lumens as standard bulbs, which also worries me, I've cursed at the menaces out on the road that are clearly driving with illegal lamps and blinding everyone on the road with them... ....I hope the cops pull them over and ticket them.... ...I won't be one of those bozo's/menaces on the road....

The HID's are expensive, and then can have expensive ballast burn out and won't work right until you replace the expensive ballast....

I used to say the Sylvania Silverstar Ultra was your cheapest option and you will be shocked how much better you can see with them..... ...but they are still expensive, $50 a set and you need two sets, and since they overdrive the filament to achieve the same lumens through a filter that changes the color temp, they don't last long, both my low beams burned out at about a year and required replacement....

Now I see the Beamtech LED Headlamps being rated the best or close to it on numerous internet rankings, its advertising claims it focuses properly and 6500k color temp with 1000 lumens..... ...and they are only $40 a set off Amazon....

Still say your safest bet is the Sylvania Silverstar Ultra's.... ...best bang for the buck, guaranteed to work right and much better than your current bulbs....
But, I have to admit, the Beamtech LED's at $40 a set is not much of a risk if they don't live up to the claims.....
 

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Would you recommend this full headlamp swap over saving some money and just replacing all the bulbs with LEDs ?
depends on how much money you want to spend. Despite what people will tell you the only good LED's are the ones that cost money. Most cheap led's on the market or amazon are simply and led put onto a board and considered a headlight. Sure their bright but they dont put the light thru the projector the correct way and blind the shit out of oncoming drivers , and also wont illuminate the road correctly. HID is the best way to go for our jeeps since the projectors arent the best. I went with LED's to start and while it was fine, i loved the look of the black hosing and the led ribbon of the Bi-Xenon lights so thats why i chose that route.
221557
 

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Anyone familiar with or use any lights from Diode Dynamics ?
Diode Dynamics doesn't show up on any of the lists of best LED Headlamps, so all you've got to go on is their claims.
Even the lists of the best LED's, photos of the beam patterns for some of them look horrible, others look good. And I don't see any correlation between price and good beam patterns or brightness in the few lists I see on the internet..... ....see why I'm still a bit wary about the LED headlamps? It really looks like there is no guarantee you're going to get what you expect....

I've seen a lot of complaints about the fans failing, and the few with just a hink sink with no fan, i.e. solid state, would be a plus in my view.......
 

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Diode Dynamics doesn't show up on any of the lists of best LED Headlamps, so all you've got to go on is their claims.
Even the lists of the best LED's, photos of the beam patterns for some of them look horrible, others look good. And I don't see any correlation between price and good beam patterns or brightness in the few lists I see on the internet..... ....see why I'm still a bit wary about the LED headlamps? It really looks like there is no guarantee you're going to get what you expect....

I've seen a lot of complaints about the fans failing, and the few with just a hink sink with no fan, i.e. solid state, would be a plus in my view.......
Well put, alot of people on here and on facebook always post about how bright there leds are and how awesome they are. However they fail to usually post a picture of the output on the road or against a wall and dont realize that led's also need to be indexed correctly to even work remotely close to how they should. Anytime i see someone post about a $30 pair from amazon i just shake my head. Sure their bright but there complete crap. I used the VLED's Micro about 2 years ago and yes they worked well and were indexed corretly but a pain to put in. Since ive switched my housings over to the bi-xenon's it has been drastically better for lux and lumens with the hid's.
 

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The problem with LED's is that they are not DOT Approved and thus not street legal.....
The same is true with the signal and park lamps, but cops and inspectors don't bother with those lamps unless you've got a really bad combination of LED Bulb and light fixture that just doesn't work right.....
Actually, the legality of lighting modifications varies by state. The DOT Approved label has nothing to do with it since that only applies to vehicle manufacturer's... individual owners are free to make modifications as long as they meet state requirements. In fact, the DOT doesn't approve or disapprove of aftermarket parts at all so a DOT Approved label on an aftermarket part means exactly nothing - it's just marketing. Some states incorporate the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 (the federal lighting standard) into their own motor vehicle laws while others define their own requirements. For example, Florida only defines performance standards for lighting - they must be certain colors, positioned in specified location on the vehicle, visible from a specified distance, etc. Some states even specify enforcement - in Tennessee, only the Highway Patrol can stop vehicles for lighting violations... city and county officers are not authorized to do so.

The NHTSA has issued an opinion that is impossible for an HID kit to work properly in halogen reflector headlights so states will generally consider that a violation. Yet HID kits in halogen projector headlights are not considered a problem. With LEDs, there has been no opinion issued so performance would be the primary consideration. They would have to produce sufficient light without blinding or distracting other drivers but if they do that then they would be considered legal in most jurisdictions.

Now, in states which have vehicle inspections, the use of non-standard aftermarket parts may be enough to fail inspection - I don't know, we haven't had inspections here in 20 years. That may be something to watch out for if you have to get regular inspections.

Diode Dynamics is a good company that makes quality products but I haven't tried their headlight LEDs so I don't know how good they are (their HID kits are excellent). I am currently using V-LEDs Micro Extreme LED headlight bulbs and they are impressive. They install without modifying the dust cap (for the cooling fan) and produce a nice white (5000K) light that's as good as HID with the same beam cutoff pattern as the original halogen bulbs. I've had them over a year now and they still perform like new without any heat problems.
 

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Actually, the legality of lighting modifications varies by state. The DOT Approved label has nothing to do with it since that only applies to vehicle manufacturer's... individual owners are free to make modifications as long as they meet state requirements. In fact, the DOT doesn't approve or disapprove of aftermarket parts at all so a DOT Approved label on an aftermarket part means exactly nothing - it's just marketing. Some states incorporate the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 (the federal lighting standard) into their own motor vehicle laws while others define their own requirements. For example, Florida only defines performance standards for lighting - they must be certain colors, positioned in specified location on the vehicle, visible from a specified distance, etc. Some states even specify enforcement - in Tennessee, only the Highway Patrol can stop vehicles for lighting violations... city and county officers are not authorized to do so.

The NHTSA has issued an opinion that is impossible for an HID kit to work properly in halogen reflector headlights so states will generally consider that a violation. Yet HID kits in halogen projector headlights are not considered a problem. With LEDs, there has been no opinion issued so performance would be the primary consideration. They would have to produce sufficient light without blinding or distracting other drivers but if they do that then they would be considered legal in most jurisdictions.

Now, in states which have vehicle inspections, the use of non-standard aftermarket parts may be enough to fail inspection - I don't know, we haven't had inspections here in 20 years. That may be something to watch out for if you have to get regular inspections.

Diode Dynamics is a good company that makes quality products but I haven't tried their headlight LEDs so I don't know how good they are (their HID kits are excellent). I am currently using V-LEDs Micro Extreme LED headlight bulbs and they are impressive. They install without modifying the dust cap (for the cooling fan) and produce a nice white (5000K) light that's as good as HID with the same beam cutoff pattern as the original halogen bulbs. I've had them over a year now and they still perform like new without any heat problems.
Lighting is extraordinarily complex, the military has lost millions on screwing up lighting for Night Vision facilities because it is so hard to design and get right, and they've spent millions with top scientist coming up with milspecs to write standards and tests to get light correct the first time.....

In the auto industry, the manufacturers have to send their light fixtures to DOT to test and certify them, the industry has stringent design specs for bulbs that all have to meet and the DOT certification guarantees the light fixture works properly....

In many states you will fail a safety inspection because the lighting is not DOT certified, that is in the State's code.... ....in MD, our local Jeep club constantly complains that their Jeep fails inspection because the LED Headlamp was not DOT certified....

So yes, Federal Standards and DOT only apply to the manufacturer since they sell and ship their vehicle across state lines, the interstate commerce clause is the opening for the Federal Gov to regulate the manufacturers. And yes, once purchased and registered in a state, safety and equipment become a state affair and whether it is street legal or not, depends on the state laws and codes.

But DOT is not worthless, because it is the certification that the equipment meets the Design specs and thus will operate like it should. If it's not DOT certified, than it may not work properly or be up to spec, with lighting, it is very likely not to work properly....

As well the fact many states laws and codes simply adopt the federal and DOT codes, especially for lighting, still makes DOT relevant, not worthless.
 

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The comment was specifically about DOT Approved labels on aftermarket parts. The DOT does not approve aftermarket parts so such a label is untrue. On the other hand, there are standards for lighting that are published by the DOT and can be used by aftermarket manufacturers to test their products. Those standards involve such things as brightness, glare, color, and intensity, but not technology. If a manufacturer builds an LED bulb which can be shown to produce the necessary amount of light in the right color and not blinding other drivers then they could say "meets DOT standards" and it would be legal to use them in a vehicle on the road. But since there is no way they can submit the bulbs to the DOT for testing (the DOT doesn't test aftermarket parts), they really can't say DOT approved and have it mean anything.

Basically that means that any different technology used to replace halogen bulbs does not meet DOT standards because the light source would not be the same shape, position and orientation as the original bulb. This is especially true of HID replacement kits. The light source of an HID capsule is positioned farther from the base and is curved (due to the rising of the arc during use) as well as being parallel to the stem (most halogen bulbs have filaments that are perpendicular to the stem). Those differences will always affect the light output from the intricately designed reflectors in a halogen headlight - more so with a reflector bowl than with a projector. Recent LED bulb designs have come much closer by positioning the LEDs in the same position and orientation as the original filament but they suffer from the fact that LEDs are directional while halogen filaments emit light in all directions.
 

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The comment was specifically about DOT Approved labels on aftermarket parts. The DOT does not approve aftermarket parts so such a label is untrue. On the other hand, there are standards for lighting that are published by the DOT and can be used by aftermarket manufacturers to test their products. Those standards involve such things as brightness, glare, color, and intensity, but not technology. If a manufacturer builds an LED bulb which can be shown to produce the necessary amount of light in the right color and not blinding other drivers then they could say "meets DOT standards" and it would be legal to use them in a vehicle on the road. But since there is no way they can submit the bulbs to the DOT for testing (the DOT doesn't test aftermarket parts), they really can't say DOT approved and have it mean anything.

Basically that means that any different technology used to replace halogen bulbs does not meet DOT standards because the light source would not be the same shape, position and orientation as the original bulb. This is especially true of HID replacement kits. The light source of an HID capsule is positioned farther from the base and is curved (due to the rising of the arc during use) as well as being parallel to the stem (most halogen bulbs have filaments that are perpendicular to the stem). Those differences will always affect the light output from the intricately designed reflectors in a halogen headlight - more so with a reflector bowl than with a projector. Recent LED bulb designs have come much closer by positioning the LEDs in the same position and orientation as the original filament but they suffer from the fact that LEDs are directional while halogen filaments emit light in all directions.
I see plenty of aftermarket parts advertising DOT certified and bearing the DOT certification on the part.
There must be some certification process for them to be able to do this.
And it may be as simple as submit your design and we will review it and stamp it certified or not.
Cause you might note the aftermarket parts that bear DOT symbols and certification are exact replicas of the OEM products.
Bulbs have reference designs, if you want to market bulbs you build yourself, I suspect all you have to do is make it conform exactly to the reference design, i.e. produce an exact replica, that also meets all the specs, and you can put DOT on it and advertise it meets DOT.

Sylvania states they are working on achieving DOT certification for their LED replacement bulbs, how can they be doing this if DOT refuses to test or consider aftermarket parts?

The problem with LED's is that they can NOT meet reference designs and exact specs to replace existing incandescent bulbs..... ....so they are outside of the system that DOT and the manufacturers have setup for DOT certification and parts that meet them.....

The OEM LED's, you might note, like their incandescent light fixtures, have to be tested and certified by DOT. Since Incandescent light fixtures will have bulbs that will burn out, they use DOT certified bulbs in those designs, that all the owner in the field has to do is purchase a bulb of the same reference design that is DOT certified and the whole light fixture will work exactly like when it came from the factory. LED's light fixtures that come OEM, the only difference is the LED doesn't burn out, so the OEM doesn't have to use some reference designed bulb, cause the LED's never need to be replaced..... ...and in the unlikely event the LED stops working, and it has happened, you replace the entire light fixture with a new one from the OEM.....

Enter your aftermarket LED for retrofit to incandescent light fixtures.... ....they can't meet the bulb reference design, they way they work and how the elements are shaped, it just can't be done, so to get it certified by DOT, if its possible at all, is to go through the entire testing from scratch of every possible light fixture.... ....incredibly difficult....

You want to sell an incandescent bulb, you have to do is create an exact replica of the reference design.... ....have noticed that the incandescent bulbs of different brands all look exactly the same?
 

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I think we are starting to agree a lot here.....
I think the difference is, and we may not disagree on this.....

DOT accepts the exact replica of an approved fixture or bulb will perform just like the tested and certified item.....
That is why aftermarket items that are exact replica's of the OEM part have the DOT approval/certification.....

BTW, this is hardly the only Regulatory Agency with this Stance, look at how OBDII works and gets certified.... ....you get demo cars of each configuration that could change pollution fully tested and certified, as long as the cars off the production line are exact replica's it assumed they make the same pollution as the tested demo and thus are all OBDII legal.....

Like you said yourself, its physically impossible to replicate an incandescent bulb with LED's......
Since it is not an exact replica, the easy DOT approval/certification is out the window.....
You've got to get the full testing and in every possible combination, meaning every fixture that calls for that particular bulb for all cars on the road today....
 

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Bright LED for projectors:

These really outrank most popular brands posted here and create a lot of light. We also have HID but many go with the LEDs.
 

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Bright LED for projectors:

These really outrank most popular brands posted here and create a lot of light. We also have HID but many go with the LEDs.
The focus of the beam in the photo doesn't look as good as other LED's that are in rankings on the internet...... ...I'll grant you its difficult to photograph bright light at night well.....
 

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The focus of the beam in the photo doesn't look as good as other LED's that are in rankings on the internet...... ...I'll grant you its difficult to photograph bright light at night well.....
We are not sure what you mean. The beam angle mimics the halogen and projector while giving a high concentration of light on the road.

But of course you are entitled to your opinion but we are simply sharing real customer feedback.

The photo below is a customer comparing the hikari which many know is one of the brighter models- you can see the concentration of light in the center is much great and provides a lot more light on the road. He also did an entire video review I will have to find to share. It is real honest feedback and all many happy customers are running this setup.
 

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You don't want concentrated HOT SPOTS, you want an even broad beam, that lights up the entire road well, not a super bright narrow beam making a spot on the road.
Again, its difficult to photograph bright light at night, perhaps the hot spots with washout to the sides of the beam are exaggerated.
 

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You don't want concentrated HOT SPOTS, you want an even broad beam, that lights up the entire road well, not a super bright narrow beam making a spot on the road.
Again, its difficult to photograph bright light at night, perhaps the hot spots with washout to the sides of the beam are exaggerated.
The projectors they are using for reflectors are creating this beam angle. Meaning our LEDs will mimic the beam angle you see now but just with more light.

In photo you can see it spreads wide side to side - this is only a few feet away from the wall so it is more concentrated so you can see how much more light is produced. Further away it spread out more. The photo you are sharing is 20-30 feet away from the wall we assume.

Here is a video showing how the light is more spread out further away and as he moves closer to the wall it starts to become more concentrated:

Regardless, there are many happy customers are running this in their jeep with a lot more light than other LEDs they tried and it is what we focus on. And we honestly do not mind if you have a different opinion. We can only focus on what we can offer and what customers will see and we know they will be happy with the setup and more light on the road with out any issues.
 
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