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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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1,777 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My rig is a 2016, so QL has been out for a while and my QL has been very dependable, with no problems in 90,000 miles. I believe QL debuted in 2011, is that right?

Are you a fan of QL, and why or why not?

For me, my JGC lives mostly on the street. I estimate that 99% of my miles are on pavement (so in my 90,000 total miles, maybe 500-1,000 miles have been on trails). QL is perfect because it gives me the extra clearance when I need it, but otherwise my JGC rides lower for better street handling and easier entry and exit. And when I’m on the trail and up at OR-I or OR-II, the decreased spring rebound (loud THUNK!) over bumps is just a minor inconvenience that I’ll gladly accept for the benefits.

But if I lived where 25% or more of my miles were on the trail, or maybe even just 10%, then I might want a permanent lift.

So are you a fan or not? What do you like or dislike about Quadra-Lift?

{And who the hell thinks up these feature names like Quadra-Lift? My ears keep wanting to hear Audra Barkley when I hear that (child of the 60s and 70s here).}
 

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I'm generally in line with your thoughts on it. It's handy for a vehicle that is primarily on hard, maintained surfaces. I don't have any gripes about the ride quality on road.

One feature you didn't mention, maybe because you don't tow (IDK), is the load leveling. Every other vehicle I've towed with hasn't had any kind of load leveling system, and it's really nice. Where as previous SUVs looked like they were dragging arse when towing, the JGC with quadralift definitely doesn't. I installed secondary air bags in a previous Pathfinder to try and help with this, and it rode terrible after that because of how much the air bags increased the spring rate.

I do think that if I lived in an area where I was offroad or on rough back roads frequently (and I definitely would be if I were not in central VA....), whatever you want to call it, I'd prefer a non-QL Grand that I could modify and tune the suspension on. One gripe is that QL pretty much is what it is - there is virtually no reasonable possibility of modifying it or upgrading it as you would a non-QL suspension in any other vehicle.
 

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Premium Member
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293 Posts
We have a 2017 - took delivery in November 2016 - and enjoy the QL so far. It did feel soft at first - we came from a 99 JGC Laredo and loved that vehicle. The ride is totally different for a number of reasons and so it seemed soft and more like a Lincoln Continental, as if you can't feel the road as much.

For any equestrians out there, it was like going from riding English or with a McClellan all your life and all of the sudden having to ride with a leather Western Saddle....but I digress!

We are in a hobby that at least once a month takes us off pavement through farmers' fields of various conditions and it is nice to be able to lift for the extra height in those situations. The jeep has enough utility to go where we need it to go, in various situations, can hold what we need it to hold, and still be a fun, comfortable daily driver/trip transportation most of the time.

Another bonus is for situations when elderly parents are riding with you - using the lowering feature allows easier enter/egress. It has been a blessing all around. So much so that we are purchasing another specifically with QL for me to transport my elderly father - can lower for him and carry a wheelchair inside when needed. I looked far and wide... there is just nothing that I like as well at this price point that still looks like an SUV, with the bells and whistles, and the ability to raise and lower when you need it to.

I am partial to Jeeps... have owned them since the 90s but never thought that I would own something with air suspension and enjoy it.
 

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I thought long and hard before getting my 2017 Trailhawk....one of the reasons was QL and its reliability and long term expense. Much of this was due to the reasonably troublefree nature of my 2000 WJ (still have it just shy of 250k). Especially regarding the suspension.

For some things, I still prefer a good spring suspension....QL can be a little too floaty at times for my taste. It would be nice if tnere were more adjustability to tune the suspension to driver preference. Like sport mode actually changing dampening characteristics and spring rate, and having that available for normal mode as well. From reading reviews it appears Land Rover has their air suspension a little more dialed in, if no more reliable.

Overall, I like it for the reasons others posted and hedged reliability by buying the lifetime Maxcare once I determined the vehicle was problem prone, a d that I really like it, a lot!
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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1,777 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One feature you didn't mention, maybe because you don't tow (IDK), is the load leveling. Every other vehicle I've towed with hasn't had any kind of load leveling system, and it's really nice. Where as previous SUVs looked like they were dragging arse when towing, the JGC with quadralift definitely doesn't.
Good point. I do tow on occassion, but I don’t own any trailers. I tow mostly U-Haul trailers and the load leveling is great. I’ve towed my wife’s car on a U-Haul auto transport (this one, https://www.uhaul.com/Trailers/Auto-Transport-Rental/AT/) up and over the Santa Cruz Mountains here and the CRD was barely breathing hard.

And I’ve seen those tow rigs with their noses pointed to the sky. Yes, the load leveling is a nice feature.

One gripe is that QL pretty much is what it is - there is virtually no reasonable possibility of modifying it or upgrading it as you would a non-QL suspension in any other vehicle.
I can’t blame Jeep for this, because most owners can’t even spell words like D-I-R-T and M-U-D and T-R-A-I-L :D, so why not sell the JGC with QL? It would be nice to have decent non-QL options, though.
 

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9,694 Posts
I'm a fan of QL. I like the versatility it brings and find the ride very comfortable. While there is increased risk of maintenance, that's not surprising since it's a more complex system than regular springs. The one time mind did require service it was covered fully by my MaxCare extended service contract, not including the $100 deductible. That's one problem in 7 years.
 

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2015 WK2 Overland
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1,879 Posts
I have a 2015 with 40k miles. I've owned it with 10k of those miles. According to the service history there have been no suspension issue and no issues under my ownership. The versatility (although it's a pavement princess) and load leveling are great but my biggest like is the ride quality. The city I live in has horrendous roads. The Jeep just glides along.

For most the system seems to be reliable but I have purchased MaxCare Lifetime...as they say....in MaxCare we trust.
 

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Premium Member
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2,137 Posts
I've only had mine for a little less than a year, but I agree with all of the above points, and I really like it. (But yes I did buy the lifetime Maxcare.)
 

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I have the 2014 GC Overland and one of the main reasons i got it was the QL. I think its great for all the above points. Lowering for elderly ease getting in and out, and also the self leveling feature for towing (i tow a track bike around).

Most is used for the highway with very few miles off-roading, but its always come in handy to get that extra clearance. now the family hates it as i make them wait till the jeep if fully lowered before they get out... we should never be in that big of a rush to do anything
 

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2,137 Posts
Just noticed this in the owner's manual:

"After the engine is turned off, it may be noticed that the air suspension system operates briefly, this is normal. The system is correcting the position of the vehicle to ensure a proper appearance."

Who needs a vanity plate? I have a vanity Jeep! Wonder if it checks its look in store window reflections ...
 

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2015 WK2 Overland
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Just noticed this in the owner's manual:

"After the engine is turned off, it may be noticed that the air suspension system operates briefly, this is normal. The system is correcting the position of the vehicle to ensure a proper appearance."

Who needs a vanity plate? I have a vanity Jeep! Wonder if it checks its look in store window reflections ...
:lol:

Nothing beats the looks people give it when it levels after turning it off. It's just making sure it looks goooood. :cool:
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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1,777 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My wife’s cousin has a Land Rover, and I’m not sure which one. It’s maybe a 2005, roughly, and it has the air adjustable suspension. The system failed and the cost to repair it was too high, so he put in a mild, permanent lift kit.

I hope that (the system failure) is not in our futures!
 

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2011 Summit 4x4
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391 Posts
I like my 2011 w/QL. I actually think it rides a bit higher than a standard suspension. The float eats up pot holes. Awesome for city streets constantly under construction. I could never drive a sport suspension daily again.
 

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Subaru Legacy STIEVO
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2,074 Posts
I am a fan of the Quadra Lift. It is useful off-road which I occasionally indulge in, and it is meaningful for highway handling and fuel economy. And reasonably reliable.
 

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Premium Member
Jeep Grand Cherokee
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2,642 Posts
My rig is a 2016, so QL has been out for a while and my QL has been very dependable, with no problems in 90,000 miles. I believe QL debuted in 2011, is that right?

Are you a fan of QL, and why or why not?

For me, my JGC lives mostly on the street. I estimate that 99% of my miles are on pavement (so in my 90,000 total miles, maybe 500-1,000 miles have been on trails). QL is perfect because it gives me the extra clearance when I need it, but otherwise my JGC rides lower for better street handling and easier entry and exit. And when I’m on the trail and up at OR-I or OR-II, the decreased spring rebound (loud THUNK!) over bumps is just a minor inconvenience that I’ll gladly accept for the benefits.

But if I lived where 25% or more of my miles were on the trail, or maybe even just 10%, then I might want a permanent lift.

So are you a fan or not? What do you like or dislike about Quadra-Lift?

{And who the hell thinks up these feature names like Quadra-Lift? My ears keep wanting to hear Audra Barkley when I hear that (child of the 60s and 70s here).}
I agree! Wouldn't be without QL. In fact my wife with a disability insists on it to make entry and exit easier. I agree that the thunk on OR-I and II is annoying but I take it as a warning that I'm going too fast. The trail you mentioned must be pretty rough. I just did 500km of gravel road of the infamous Birdsville Track at about 80-100kph at normal ride height without a problem but it sure needed concentration to avoid the occasional boulder.
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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1,777 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree! Wouldn't be without QL. In fact my wife with a disability insists on it to make entry and exit easier. I agree that the thunk on OR-I and II is annoying but I take it as a warning that I'm going too fast. The trail you mentioned must be pretty rough. I just did 500km of gravel road of the infamous Birdsville Track at about 80-100kph at normal ride height without a problem but it sure needed concentration to avoid the occasional boulder.
At NRH there is plenty of suspension travel, but up at OR-II there is very little rebound and it doesn’t take much to hear that loud THUNK. The trail doesn’t have to be very rough.
 

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Jeep Grand Cherokee
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2,642 Posts
At NRH there is plenty of suspension travel, but up at OR-II there is very little rebound and it doesn’t take much to hear that loud THUNK. The trail doesn’t have to be very rough.
Very true. I was on a relatively smooth trail not going that fast on ORII and heard the thunk, stopped the car to see what I just hit. All it was was a tree root a couple of inched thick. The wheel went over it, dropped a couple of inches on the other side and that was enough to bottomed the shocks. ORII is really only for walking pace, bummer. I'm hoping some after market provider will come up a solution.
 

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4WL TREK-er — so many trails, so little time
2016 JGC CRD
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1,777 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Very true. I was on a relatively smooth trail not going that fast on ORII and heard the thunk, stopped the car to see what I just hit. All it was was a tree root a couple of inched thick. The wheel went over it, dropped a couple of inches on the other side and that was enough to bottomed the shocks. ORII is really only for walking pace, bummer. I'm hoping some after market provider will come up a solution.
Whenever I lend out my rig (to my brother or to my kids) I show them that. I actualy demonstrate it. Once, my brother and I swapped cars for a week or two. Afterwards he said he was glad I showed him that, because he was showing his kids how it goes up and down, and when they got that bad-sounding thunk his kids thought they’d broke it. It really does sound bad, when you hear it for the first time.

But it’s working as designed.

My sister will be visiting from Texas in the fall and I’ll let her use my rig for the week or two that she is here. I’ll definitely demonstrate it to her
 

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2,137 Posts
But it’s working as designed. <-- This.

Can anybody with a 2018 who's also had an earlier model say whether the dreaded OR2 top-out thump is alleviated to any extent by the new bumpers?
 

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I only get off road a few times a year, QL is perfect for me.
I also agree the lowering it helps with the elderly passengers getting in & out.
 
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