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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I HAVE THE SOLUTION:

Locate metal tube on top of engine intake manifold (sticker with 3.8L)
Tube is held in place with two 8mm screws. Remove screws and save in safe place.

Using a wood or straight bar lift EGR tube out of entrance hole to intake and support tube with small blocks of wood.This is a plastic intake so don’t pry too hard. This tube injects exhaust gases into intake to be (re-burned) in engine to reduce emissions. The gases replace clean air. Slide oval steel plate up tube away from 90 degree bend. Remove rubber circle gasket. Cover intake hole with duct tape to prevent anything from dropping into intake manifold (important). CRIMP TUBE SHUT. I used a bolt cutter. This tool has sufficient clamping force needed. Bend and wiggle extra end metal to break-off and remove. Replace rubber seal, slide back oval retainer plate, replace and torque screws. Instant better throttle response. Your gas mileage will increase by a whopping +2 mpg and your transmission will not unlock torque converter as much. Throttle response is instant with no lag. Throttle body spacers constrict airflow to give “feeling” of better throttle response. Don’t waste your money.

Don’t be skeptical. This costs nothing and doesn’t interfere with EGR valve operation or signals sent to CPU. I have logged thousands of miles with this fix. I heard nothing about the lack of power in 3.8L until after I purchased the vehicle in 2018. I have disable EGR valves since 1970’s. Think about what and why EGR was put into engine.#1. Cheap for manufacturer to reduce emissions on current engine designs and add planned obsolescence. #2 Reduce emissions out of tail pipe regardless of how much engine power will be lost. #3 Latest engines do not have this type of emission control. #4 Replace air with some burned exhaust gas.
Your Welcome. Allthewayjumper!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My original calculations done 1,000's of miles ago, were this. 2009 Rubicon JK, 78.000 miles on odometer. 3.8L, Automatic, 285/70-17 tires Michelin Defender LTX, KN air filter, Synthetic oils everywhere. All tests were done at 32 degrees Fahrenheit temps or colder (Minnesota). Against the wind and with the wind varying hills and flat roads. Speed was 60 mph. 21 .8 mpg.

My avg. mpg is between 18-19 which is city and hwy combined. Seat of the pants difference was surprising. Unlocking of transmission on mild grade
(1-4%) hills is rarely happening now.

I've since put my summer tires on vehicle. 255/75-17 BFG Mud Terran T/A KM. 21.6 mpg hwy. With warmer air temps. Since Wrangler aerodynamics's are similar to a brick with mirrors, every possible condition has to be remembered. Avg. is 18-19 mpg. As ambient temps warm I believe mileage will increase slightly. My summer tires have more drag than the bigger/wider winter Michelin's.

I believe Jeep manufacturer's put enough slop in the air/fuel program to accommodate the EGR valve for eventual failure (planned obsolescence). The failure of the EGR valve is planned. Concerns of this kind I thought about carefully before I went with completely closing off EGR tube. You can close the EGR tube off 1/2 way if concerns of this nature are bothersome to you. The tube is right there in front and on top of this little engine. A richer air/fuel mixture will result in higher temperatures in the Catastrophic Constrictors or (catalytic converters-4 in total) because extra unburned fuel is burning in the converters.
The vehicle may or may not meet original emission standards. That was the least of my concerns. Some areas (states/cities) release you from emission standards at some point or with modifications. I'm not a legal expert. I'm an engine builder. I didn't want to have to rebuild my engine in the Jeep, even though I am prepared to at any moment. There are after-market Pro-jection fuel delivery systems along with supercharging and roller tip rockers available to me when the time comes I have been monitoring this engine carefully. Allthewayjumper!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
UPDATE 4/22/2019
Another benefit I have experienced with this modification.
Oil consumption went from 1 Quart in 3000 miles to 1 Quart in 4500 miles.
Wow... I've inspected inside of combustion chambers with camera and found clean piston tops (concentric rings top of pistons visible) and cross hatch marks in cylinder bores from original honing.
I have found that switching to premium fuel has resulted in improved mileage and performance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
UPDATE 4/22/2019
Another benefit I have experienced with this modification.
Oil consumption went from 1 Quart in 3000 miles to 1 Quart in 4500 miles.
Wow... I've inspected inside of combustion chambers with camera and found clean piston tops (concentric rings top of pistons visible) and cross hatch marks in cylinder bores from original honing.
I have found that switching to premium fuel has resulted in improved mileage and performance.
 

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I just found this Forum by accident and was reading through some of the Posts and saw this. I've been figuring out a way to do the same thing and just ordered some EGR gaskets so I can make a block off plate. Couple weeks ago I read on another Forum where Chrysler T&C mini Vans that used these engine around the early 2000's some of them didn't have EGR valves. They have a cover plate PN 04591227 on the back of the cyl head where the EGR valve is. So I look at it this way if these engines come from the Factory with no EGR they aren't needed for the engine to run.

My idea is to make a cover plate for the back of the cyl head where the EGR bolts up and find a way to hang the EGR valve so it can still function as it's supposed to and not set off any codes. Then i'll remove the steel line from the intake manifold and make a cover plate for it.
 

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I HAVE THE SOLUTION:

Locate metal tube on top of engine intake manifold (sticker with 3.8L)
Tube is held in place with two 8mm screws. Remove screws and save in safe place.

Using a wood or straight bar lift EGR tube out of entrance hole to intake and support tube with small blocks of wood.This is a plastic intake so don’t pry too hard. This tube injects exhaust gases into intake to be (re-burned) in engine to reduce emissions. The gases replace clean air. Slide oval steel plate up tube away from 90 degree bend. Remove rubber circle gasket. Cover intake hole with duct tape to prevent anything from dropping into intake manifold (important). CRIMP TUBE SHUT. I used a bolt cutter. This tool has sufficient clamping force needed. Bend and wiggle extra end metal to break-off and remove. Replace rubber seal, slide back oval retainer plate, replace and torque screws. Instant better throttle response. Your gas mileage will increase by a whopping +2 mpg and your transmission will not unlock torque converter as much. Throttle response is instant with no lag. Throttle body spacers constrict airflow to give “feeling” of better throttle response. Don’t waste your money.

Don’t be skeptical. This costs nothing and doesn’t interfere with EGR valve operation or signals sent to CPU. I have logged thousands of miles with this fix. I heard nothing about the lack of power in 3.8L until after I purchased the vehicle in 2018. I have disable EGR valves since 1970’s. Think about what and why EGR was put into engine.#1. Cheap for manufacturer to reduce emissions on current engine designs and add planned obsolescence. #2 Reduce emissions out of tail pipe regardless of how much engine power will be lost. #3 Latest engines do not have this type of emission control. #4 Replace air with some burned exhaust gas.
Your Welcome. Allthewayjumper!
Does this fix eliminate the check engine light and bad EGR code?
 
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