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Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?
 

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I did my 2014 at 50K. Engine should be cold. I don't think you'll have any frozen plug issues. My old plugs looked like new and I had no problems getting them out. Best if you have some compressed air you can use to blow out the area before pulling the plugs out just in case any dirt worked its way down.
 

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The V6 requires the removal of the Upper Plenum of the intake manifold to get access to half the spark plugs. Its gets just complex enough that its too much for a newb.....

The V8 Hemi is easy, its just 16 of them that needs to be changed, so its just a long job.....

Go to RockAuto, and order iridium plugs if you want to go that way, they cost half as much as in the stores.....
 

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RockAuto.com has:
NGK 92145 Laser Iridium ; Recommended FCA IRIDIUM OE extended service part for $6.33 each.

They have other brands for as little as $4.61 each.....

But if it was me, I'd go with the Iridium version of the OEM plug, and they are claiming that FCA recommends this plug if you want to go with Iridium extended life plugs......
 

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The Hemi requires 16 plugs and one side is "challenging". Personally, I always had the dealer do it. It's about a $330 service, give or take, because it takes a bit of time due to "logistics".
 

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Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?
If you have the tools, it'll take you less than an hour, at $150 for plugs, is not driving to the dealer, waiting an hour, getting told something else is wrong/required and driving home worth $350 to you?
 

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Have you ever done plugs before on another vehicle. Most important thing is not to drop the plugs in and only hand tighten first as to not cross thread the plugs when putting back in otherwise you will have a really bad day.
 

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Another tip, since its so easy to strip out aluminum threads especially when you use lots of anti-seize. Anti-Seize is a lubricant and it will create more clamp force on the thread than corresponding torque on the nut head. i.e. if you use a lubricant and torque it to spec, you've overtorqued the threads. Guidance I've seen, if you use anti-seize, reduce the spec torque by 25%.

You only need a little dab of anti-seize on the beginning of the threads, don't use a torque wrench, read the instructions on the box for the spark plug, for the 5.7L Hemi since its plugs use a compressible seal, to tighten the plug finger tight then turn it 3/4 of a turn with the wrench. Follow the instructions and you won't strip out the threads. You'll see as you approach 3/4 of a turn, the wrench will move very little as force goes up greatly, at that point you stop, even if it is just short of 3/4 of a turn. Spark plugs for aluminum heads have a very long threaded section, they will not back out, especially if they have the compressible washer, so being dead on torque is not really that important, what's important is that they are somewhat tight and you don't overdue it and strip the threads.

Honestly, all you need for a spark plug change, besides the plugs themselves:
Anti-Seize
Dielectric Grease
A small socket wrench and socket (I think 10mm) for the bolts to pull the coils.
A 3/8" drive flexbar, probably two extensions, and spark plug socket for the plugs (I think 5/8")
Maybe a little Vasoline for the pop on cover over the engine, it goes on much easier with a bit of lube on the rubber sockets you force over the bayonets...

If you want to be extra thorough, a can of electrical cleaner for the electric connectors for the coils.
 

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The V6 requires the removal of the Upper Plenum of the intake manifold to get access to half the spark plugs. Its gets just complex enough that its too much for a newb.....
Sounds like a genuine PITA just for a plug change.
 

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Sounds like a genuine PITA just for a plug change.
Ford's V6's does the same thing.
I haven't done it on an FCA V6 but did it on a Ford V6, the new plastic manifolds have a channel with a silicone gasket that is very re-usable. So it could be designed to be a pretty darn easy job to pull the upper plenum (the intake manifold splits in half mind you, so its just 6 or 8 small bolts and lift).. ...but Ford for some crazy reason has tons of braces and attachments to support other things on the upper plenum in hard areas to reach, it ends up taking an extra hour and half to get all this garbage unattached and then 5 minutes to unbolt and lift the upper plenum off and give the access to the plugs on that bank of cylinders.... ...perhaps its better on the FCA 3.6L, but what little I've read on it, it sounds like an equal PITA.... ...hopefully someone that has done it chimes in...
 

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If you have the tools, it'll take you less than an hour, at $150 for plugs, is not driving to the dealer, waiting an hour, getting told something else is wrong/required and driving home worth $350 to you?
Good point!!!
 

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The V6 requires the removal of the Upper Plenum of the intake manifold to get access to half the spark plugs. Its gets just complex enough that its too much for a newb.....

The V8 Hemi is easy, its just 16 of them that needs to be changed, so its just a long job.....

Go to RockAuto, and order iridium plugs if you want to go that way, they cost half as much as in the stores.....
just changed my V6 plugs over the weekend. as you say the upper plenum must be removed to access the driver side plugs. there is a stud on the rear of the passenger side head that needs to be removed, if you know a 2 year old with small hands that can reach in there, it would be a big help! my big mitts are all scraped up from trying to get them in there. took a while, and a lot of swear words, but finally got it done.
 

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but as the OP has a hemi, that's moot, just pop the cover and the coil packs are right there.
One side of the engine for the hemi is challenging because of access/space. It's one of the reasons why the labor is so high for a dealer or mechanic plug change.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?
One side of the engine for the hemi is challenging because of access/space. It's one of the reasons why the labor is so high for a dealer or mechanic plug change.
One side of the engine for the hemi is challenging because of access/space. It's one of the reasons why the labor is so high for a dealer or mechanic plug change.
 

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just changed my V6 plugs over the weekend. as you say the upper plenum must be removed to access the driver side plugs. there is a stud on the rear of the passenger side head that needs to be removed, if you know a 2 year old with small hands that can reach in there, it would be a big help! my big mitts are all scraped up from trying to get them in there. took a while, and a lot of swear words, but finally got it done.
Sorry, I have the HEMI, I have done the job on a Ford V6 with the same kind of intake manifold, and despite it being transverse in a Ford Explorer, that did have a brackets that has to be removed in the back of the upper plenum that is the same as you're complaining.... I literally scratched up my hands and used a 1/4" socket set moving it 20° at a time....

I have to disagree on the HEMI, changing plugs was simple and straightforward, the only thing was, since its 16 plugs it took a lot longer than most spark plug changes simply because of the number of plugs.... ....I seem to remember having to mix it up with flex bar or socket wrench, different length extensions for the socket, etc... ...so a couple of the plugs probably are a tight fit (cause that is usually why I shift around using different tools in my tool box) but I don't remember anything that slowed me down more than a few minutes....

...and the HEMI is squeezed in, and the V6 is not exactly pea rattling around a pod either, but that is the same with most cars, the crash standards they have to meet, results in the structure taking up a lot of space and intrudes on the engine compartment.... ....a Lot of us old guys can tell you, Chrysler cars of the 60's and 70's had plenty of room to work on the vehicle, as well, Chrysler was the far better at the other manufacturers at planning out their designs and making most things that need service or repair far more accessible... ...today that has gone out the window, since Daimler and Fiat took over, serviceability doesn't seem to ever enter the mind of designers... ...My best example is the motor mount, since they put so much plastic on the engine, the only way to change a motor mount is a 10 times more complicated procedure using all sorts of a special and expensive equipment.... ...yet they decide to select a hydraulic mount and do nothing to make the mount more durable than most mounts, so its your problem when the mount needs replaced at 60k miles, and you don't own the $700 of special equipment and have to pay a dealer $500 to replace it..... .....while just a few years earlier, the mount would probably last 160k miles, and take an hour with a floor jack to replace it with simple hand tools....
 

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Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?

I have been changing plugs in my 2005 300c hemi and my 2011 Grand Cherokee hemi, Some of the easiest plugs i have ever changed.
There has been lots listed about the Hemi NOT liking iridium plugs, throwing codes and poor performance.
I have always changed with OEM type plugs, usually less than $5 each and never had an issue.

The process I have used, ON A COLD ENGINE, is to remove coil packs, loosen plug 1/2-1 turn and spray in some deep creep in each plug well.
Let it sit awhile while I gap the new plugs then slowly back out the plugs. Any resistance I tighten 1/2 turn and spray more deep creep but have only needed to do the once,
Once the plugs are out a LITTLE anti seize on the new threads and torque to specs,
Replace the coil packs and torque to specs.

First time took 1 1/2 hours, now under an hour.

Smokes when you start the first time from the deep creep so have the doors open!

Hope it helps
 

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Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?
I have a 2012 with the 5.7 hemi. Including checking plug gaps and applying anti seize it takes about an hour to change plugs. For the driver side back plugs using a socket swivel adapter is the way to go. Be sure to use a torque wrench when installing @ 18.5 - 22 ft lbs

While my manual recommends changing plugs at 32K my first change was made at 50K using NGK OEM plugs for which I paid $4/plug. My second change was at 110K using copper core Champion 446 plugs for which I paid $2/plug. I now have 180,600 with no decrease in mileage or performance and do not intend to change again until 200K. I do not see any need to spend $$$ on iridium plugs when you can run the Champions for (my target) 90K.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks Jim. You are first to mention the degree of difficulty with space on one side. Is it so severe that it incurs a dealer increase in labor cost?
I am a bit skittish about plug removal since I broke my first and only one off at age 14 before I knew there was such a thing as a torque wrench. .

Anyone else on this situation and how to handle?
Trying to decide if I should have dealer change plugs in 2013 jeep gc hemi for $500 or do it myself with iridium plugs at $9-$10 apiece.

How difficult is to it yourself considering they have been in for 6.5 years. frozen issues?

Some advice?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for all of the Spark Plug change advice. Now for a change of subject.

I have 2013 Jeep GC Overland w/hemi. Just checked mileage with 110,000 miles on original plugs.

At 60, Adaptive cruise control, GS parkway. 26.1
At 65 " " " " 24.7 minus 1.4 mpg.
A check at 55 might be 27-27.5? .
 
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