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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I traced non working tail lights on the right side of my wife's 2006 Grand Cherokee to a potential open wire in the harness. I found 12v at the fuse but 0v at the connector which plugs into the tail light assembly.

Simple fixes would be to find the break and jumper around it, jumper from the right tail light socket connection to the left putting both tail lights on one 10A fuse/wire or run a new wire from the tail light to fuse.

I have been trying to find an after market tail light wire harness but have not been successful in finding one that is compatible.

Can anyone provide the mopar part number and/or a compatible after market part and site to purchase on ?

Help would be appreciated.

Update - I just spoke with a dealer's part department and was told there is not a separate harness section for the tail lights only an entire body harness. Appears I am back to one of the other options I listed unless other suggestions are offered.
 

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This is the "WK2" Forum, which is 2011-2018 and on, Jeep Grand Cherokee's.

A 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee is a "WK", which have their own separate forum and you'd likely have more luck there.

If its any help, I have jumpered broken/shorted/chaffed/burnt wires before in the middle of the harness, and the repair lasted the rest of the life of the car with no difficulties. The secret is attention to detail.

Clean, cut away damage, have good clean, clean cut edges of the wire and insulation, use good butt splices (I strip off the insulation) and use Shrink Wrap. I also solder the connection, but that's controversial, there is just as much of a chance that the solder stiffening the wire and connection and making it brittle will cause it to fail in the future as the fact corrosion or heat cycling might make the butt connection come apart in the future.

The fact that some Instructions I've seen for Mopar Accessories, that require wire splices, the instructions recommend soldering the crimped connections makes me believe soldering field expedient splices is considered longer lasting and durable then just crimping alone.

Keep in mind, when harness's are built by machine at the factory, they have exactly sized crimp connectors for the wires and the connection are machine made, then sealed in weather proof connector (i.e. the crimps are 10 times better than any human can do in the field). In this case, soldering the connection aren't necessary and the brittleness that comes along with soldering is probably more of a detractor than an advantage to assure corrosion and heat cycling doesn't separate the connection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is the "WK2" Forum, which is 2011-2018 and on, Jeep Grand Cherokee's.

A 2006 Jeep Grand Cherokee is a "WK", which have their own separate forum and you'd likely have more luck there.

If its any help, I have jumpered broken/shorted/chaffed/burnt wires before in the middle of the harness, and the repair lasted the rest of the life of the car with no difficulties. The secret is attention to detail.

Clean, cut away damage, have good clean, clean cut edges of the wire and insulation, use good butt splices (I strip off the insulation) and use Shrink Wrap. I also solder the connection, but that's controversial, there is just as much of a chance that the solder stiffening the wire and connection and making it brittle will cause it to fail in the future as the fact corrosion or heat cycling might make the butt connection come apart in the future.

The fact that some Instructions I've seen for Mopar Accessories, that require wire splices, the instructions recommend soldering the crimped connections makes me believe soldering field expedient splices is considered longer lasting and durable then just crimping alone.

Keep in mind, when harness's are built by machine at the factory, they have exactly sized crimp connectors for the wires and the connection are machine made, then sealed in weather proof connector (i.e. the crimps are 10 times better than any human can do in the field). In this case, soldering the connection aren't necessary and the brittleness that comes along with soldering is probably more of a detractor than an advantage to assure corrosion and heat cycling doesn't separate the connection.
I appreciate your feedback. I thought I was in the WK forum when posting but - my bad - wasn't paying sufficient attention to notice I was in WK2 forum.

Plan to find points to jumper around this afternoon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Right tail light restored:

I found a 4 wire trailer harness socket on the left side under the bumper.

I plugged a 4 wire male connector into the socket then with an added extension spliced the tail light wire (brown) into the right tail light drive wire (blue/white) which I had cut at the right tail light connector.

I had to lower the spare to route / tie wrap the added wire to the existing harness.

All now works properly.
 
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