Jeep Garage  - Jeep Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm all legs, and find that most cars are lacking in front thigh support. In multiple other cars, I've resolved this by (1) loosening the four bolts that usually hold a seat down (2) raising the front by using a spacer between the rail of the seat and the floor (3) using a longer bolt to reattach the front of the seat rail to the floor. The main front bolt on the WK2 is at an angle, so you can't put a spacer under that, as geometry would not work.

I plan on replacing only the front bolt that attaches the forward-back sliding seat rail to the bracket that the angle bolt secures. You can see this torx bolt if you slide your seat back a bit, no cover on it. Raising the sliding seat rail would involve trimming the plastic, non-structural cover that currently goes along the outside of the seat sliding rail. Pretty sure I won't lose any structural strength. End result is effectively a seat with more upward motion on front edge, leading to better thigh support.

Anyone else done this?

2020 Trailhawk.

220734
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
"The main front bolt on the WK2 is at an angle, so you can't put a spacer under that, as geometry would not work."
If you are removing the main bolt, I would say you are risking safety.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,340 Posts
If you raise the front of the rail, you probably need a long, thin, tapered shim to insure that the rail is completely supported along its length. I suspect there is metal under it along the whole length, but you certainly can check for that. I'd also be discomforted by making changes like this, but it's certainly your decision in your own vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The seat rail is (surprisingly) not supported all along its length, the metal side rails are the only support under the seat, seats are only attached at four points effectively. The plastic is just decorative.

I guess I should have been more clear that the factory maximum adjustment is not enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
Why not just use the electric seat adjustment for cushion tilt?
Yup that's what I've tried finagling with numerous times as I too am all legs & arms . With a combination of up lift & back tilting & back sliding & lumbar support I think I have it pretty good now . . . but funny thing happens on my way to the "get back in next day" - oops, when sliding off the edge of the seat to get out I must of hit one of the adjustment levers ! Yea I do NOT have a Laramie (no auto reset buttons) -- UGH, here we go again ! Makes me wish I had a good Manual Adjustments seat . :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
cattle
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
The seat rail is (surprisingly) not supported all along its length, the metal side rails are the only support under the seat, seats are only attached at four points effectively. The plastic is just decorative.

I guess I should have been more clear that the factory maximum adjustment is not enough.
Ah, I get it now. I actually am at the same point in two of my vehicles, the two with electric seats. I have tilted the front to max up and the rear to max down and sometimes I wish I could get more up in the front (or down in the back). In the old days I used to do the longer bolts with spacers adjustment method but I'm not comfortable doing that with modern cars tough safety standards.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
So necessity is the mother of invention. I have about a 1.5 inch vertical raise at the front now. Here's how.
I took 1"x2" aluminum 6061 bar. Cut 4" lengths. Used a 1" longer bolt than the OEM bolts. Drilled hole through aluminum bar, screw longer bolt back into OEM threaded hole. Upper, new hole is a new bolt to the old foot bracket. Drilled hole and tapped to create threads. Threaded in new bolts. Loctite all around.
Foot brackets rest very nicely on the aluminum bar, as far as angle difference, the foot bracket is about 4 degrees off of the face of the aluminum bar, once you tighten everything, you can't tell. There is no movement at all. I left off the OEM brackets, much easier to check tightness of the bolts without having to remove that.
Block1.JPG
220956
220957
220958
 

·
Premium Member
GC Limited
Joined
·
747 Posts
Nice work and 6061 should provide good strength and corrosion resistance. I'd still keep an eye out for any signs of galvanic corrosion in the future.

That said, I would have reservations about this Mod, as the load on the original bolt and mount has been altered due to the length of the 6061 and the seat mounting angle.
May be an insurance nightmare following and accident if someone was injured in the seat.
A Jim says it's your decision and if it works for you and your happy with it, enjoy the comfy seat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
While I applaud the ingenuity, I agree that there are loads on components not designed for this format. At the very least I'd not rely on the aluminum threads, I'd drill out the threads and use a longer bolt, nut and lock washer instead.

Those are either Grade 8 or 10.9 nuts and bolts aren't they?
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top