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After waiting patiently for the 2014s to arrive, I think I've finally decided that a 4x4 Summit is in my near future. I drove one the other day and really, really liked it. It corrected every doubt I had about the 2013 and then some. In fact, there wasn't much about the new JGC I didn't like.

So now I'm in the predicament of whether or not I want to wait for the 3.0 diesel engine to arrive. I really do want the best of both worlds. I want the better gas mileage, better torque, and I want to do as much for the environment as I can (to help offset all the supercharged V8s I've owned over the years). I realize I won't be saving much money because of the added cost of the CRD plus the fact that diesel is more expensive. Having said that, the three biggest concerns I have about the diesel are:

1) It still sounds like a diesel, at least compared to the Toureg I drove. I'm not sure I like the sound.

2) When I drive on the highway, I do a lot of passing. I'm worried that the higher rpms at passing speeds means I'll be relying on the measly 240 hp. I like passing capability.

3) I've been looking around my neighborhood and all my favorite gas stations don't have diesel. Plus, it seems like when you find a station that has diesel, it only has one pump compared to a dozen other gasoline pumps. That means waiting times at the pump will increase. I'm not the most patient person (see #2 above).

Having said all this, it seems all the reviews I've seen and read online about the diesel are overwhelmingly positive.

Just looking for some input. Should I wait for the diesel to come out, or take the plunge now with a Hemi?

Tony
 

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Plunge now. The world could end tomorrow.
 

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After waiting patiently for the 2014s to arrive, I think I've finally decided that a 4x4 Summit is in my near future. I drove one the other day and really, really liked it. It corrected every doubt I had about the 2013 and then some. In fact, there wasn't much about the new JGC I didn't like.

So now I'm in the predicament of whether or not I want to wait for the 3.0 diesel engine to arrive. I really do want the best of both worlds. I want the better gas mileage, better torque, and I want to do as much for the environment as I can (to help offset all the supercharged V8s I've owned over the years). I realize I won't be saving much money because of the added cost of the CRD plus the fact that diesel is more expensive. Having said that, the three biggest concerns I have about the diesel are:

1) It still sounds like a diesel, at least compared to the Toureg I drove. I'm not sure I like the sound.

2) When I drive on the highway, I do a lot of passing. I'm worried that the higher rpms at passing speeds means I'll be relying on the measly 240 hp. I like passing capability.

3) I've been looking around my neighborhood and all my favorite gas stations don't have diesel. Plus, it seems like when you find a station that has diesel, it only has one pump compared to a dozen other gasoline pumps. That means waiting times at the pump will increase. I'm not the most patient person (see #2 above).

Having said all this, it seems all the reviews I've seen and read online about the diesel are overwhelmingly positive.

Just looking for some input. Should I wait for the diesel to come out, or take the plunge now with a Hemi?

Tony
Wait... Need to share the pain lol
 

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There is an existing thread that asks, is the diesel worth it? If you are really interested, do a search. It covers just about every pro and con anybody could think of.

A new thread on an old topic won't get you half of the info that's already out there.
 

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I've been driving a diesel for nearly 10 years and I've had to wait at a pump exactly zero times even if there is only one pump at the station. I've waited more times getting gas for my wife's car over the years.

The inconvenience of finding an intown diesel pump isn't insignificant though. I need to plan my routes so I don't have to go too far out of the way. But with the 700+ mile range, that'll be a once every couple weeks inconvenience.
 

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I'd wait for the diesel. It is going to save you money in the long run - and unless your paying cash for the entire purchase price up front, the CRD is going to save you money from day one.

In the past, opting for the CRD would have never been an option for me. But if you look at the plain numbers, the CRD just makes sense. I went over this a couple of times and the end, the diesel simply is the logical choice.

Is the CRD 0.5 secs slower from 0-60? Probably - but the Grand Cherokee is no racecar. Is Diesel more expensive than regular or mid-grade fuel? It sure is but in the end, it doesn't matter because the HEMI is rated at 15 MPG overall while the CRD is going to get 23 MPG (or better).

So if you either lease or finance, the higher monthly payment for the CRD over the HEMI upgrade is EASILY compensated by fuel-savings - even if you consider the higher diesel cost. The difference in MPGs is simply too big.:)
 

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Check the diesel forum. There is a thread that I started about passing speed. Some members in other continents have given their opinion (diesels are currently available with the five speeds over there).
 

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After waiting patiently for the 2014s to arrive, I think I've finally decided that a 4x4 Summit is in my near future. I drove one the other day and really, really liked it. It corrected every doubt I had about the 2013 and then some. In fact, there wasn't much about the new JGC I didn't like.

So now I'm in the predicament of whether or not I want to wait for the 3.0 diesel engine to arrive. I really do want the best of both worlds. I want the better gas mileage, better torque, and I want to do as much for the environment as I can (to help offset all the supercharged V8s I've owned over the years). I realize I won't be saving much money because of the added cost of the CRD plus the fact that diesel is more expensive. Having said that, the three biggest concerns I have about the diesel are:

1) It still sounds like a diesel, at least compared to the Toureg I drove. I'm not sure I like the sound.

2) When I drive on the highway, I do a lot of passing. I'm worried that the higher rpms at passing speeds means I'll be relying on the measly 240 hp. I like passing capability.

3) I've been looking around my neighborhood and all my favorite gas stations don't have diesel. Plus, it seems like when you find a station that has diesel, it only has one pump compared to a dozen other gasoline pumps. That means waiting times at the pump will increase. I'm not the most patient person (see #2 above).

Having said all this, it seems all the reviews I've seen and read online about the diesel are overwhelmingly positive.

Just looking for some input. Should I wait for the diesel to come out, or take the plunge now with a Hemi?

Tony
Hi, answering your concerns 1-only tell it's a diesel while idling and very low speed driving town driving but very very quiet at the same time cannot hear the engine at all during highway cruising 2- please believe me when i say overtaking is too easy it actually feels stronger and pulls harder as it builds more and more speed hits 100 miles with each overtaking, i have also always had a v8 car currently a 490 hp chev, don't miss it when driving the crd 3- 2 diesel pumps versus 10 petrol pumps at my servo only waited twice in 9 months to fill up WAIT and test the crd the feeling of regret is a pretty strong one
Love!!!!!!!!!!!! My 2012 crd
 

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Car & Driver rated the "payoff" at 35k miles with the '14 CRD. Meaning after you drive 35k miles you'll then be "ahead" of your initial investment in the more expensive engine and fuel.
 

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Car & Driver rated the "payoff" at 35k miles with the '14 CRD. Meaning after you drive 35k miles you'll then be "ahead" of your initial investment in the more expensive engine and fuel.
Was that in comparison to the Pentastar or the HEMI? Compared to the regular V6, the savings are certainly harder to achieve although that comparision is a bit unfair because the Pentastar doesn't come close to the performance of the CRD.

Now, when it comes to the comparison between the HEMI and the CRD, we have to see if there is such an initial investment in the first place. I guess the majority will be financing or leasing and therefore, won't have a higher initial out of pocket expense for the CRD.

So in the end it boils down to monthly expenses - and as soon as you "drive enough" to save more on fuel than what your monthly lease- or financing-up charge will be, you are saving the moment you get into the car.:thumbsup:
 

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Oops, it was Edmunds that reported that, and it was relative to the Hemi V8.

Their words:
Jeep is asking a $4,500 premium for the diesel engine, which makes it $2,305 more expensive than the Hemi V8. A bit of quick math using national average fuel prices reveals that the Ecodiesel will pay for itself relative to the Hemi V8 in about 35,000 miles. Guess you really have to want the extra torque.
 

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Oops, it was Edmunds that reported that, and it was relative to the Hemi V8.

Their words:
Exactly.

What about a comparison to the V6? A $4500 premium over the V6 & diesel fuel often 20% or so more expensive then gas? How long will that take to amortize?

If the V6 4WD averages, say 22 and the diesel say, 26, we have a roughly 15% improvement. If diesel costs 15% more then when, exactly, is the breakeven?
 

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The first time I pulled into a gas station and there was no diesel I would shoot the jeep. I am sure its everywhere nowadays, but "dealing" with diesel is one of the biggest reasons I wouldn't choose that engine.
 

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Exactly.

What about a comparison to the V6? A $4500 premium over the V6 & diesel fuel often 20% or so more expensive then gas? How long will that take to amortize?

If the V6 4WD averages, say 22 and the diesel say, 26, we have a roughly 15% improvement. If diesel costs 15% more then when, exactly, is the breakeven?
Thanks, my brain is now about to explode. :D
 

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On the plus side, banks is already working on chips for that engine... says they can get 600 HP out of it.... now that would be worth it.
 

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One likely reason that payoff comparisons may tilt toward contrasting the CRD with the V8 is that they are more likely to be the two combinations in contention because of the equal towing capability, etc. I bought my MY12 V8 because I wanted/needed that capacity and if I were buying a MY14 right now, I'd be seriously considering the CRD for the better mileage during normal driving while still being capable of my other needs that involve a horse trailer. I do put on a lot of mile due to business travel! And there is a much smaller delta in cost between the V8 and the CRD than there would be for the V6 and the CRD. For someone buying CRD strictly for fuel economy, it's going to be a tough row to hoe to justify the big jump in vehicle cost.

Of course, none of the money things matter for someone who wants the CDR because it's a CRD. :D
 

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Exactly.

What about a comparison to the V6? A $4500 premium over the V6 & diesel fuel often 20% or so more expensive then gas? How long will that take to amortize?

If the V6 4WD averages, say 22 and the diesel say, 26, we have a roughly 15% improvement. If diesel costs 15% more then when, exactly, is the breakeven?

I did the calculations long long ago before I settled on the V6 gas. it will take you a healthy 7-9 years depending on the number of miles driven (10-15,000 miles per year). And that was done factoring an average of 25-50 cents difference and a perpetual 25 cent per year increase in average fuel prices. And it is not just 4000 dollars - it is also the added cost of the Lux II package on the Limited (or the Advanced Tech Pkg on the Overland) that you have to incur. So it truly becomes approximately a 7000 dollar difference (6670 $/invoice; since Lux II will only cost $2670 with the diesel engine) which will NOT be overcome over the realistic lifetime of the vehicle.

So if you do not want ventilated seats and upgraded leather and a few other little creature comfort stuff and you are simply hoping for better "dynamics" - be prepared to spend. Don't buy it for the fuel economy - most people are lured into a FALSE sense of over-achievement with this fuel economy on the diesel but it is only relative to the HEMI not relative to the V6. To each their own. For me and my needs, the V6 was fine as I do not have anything to tow.

take a look here:

INPUT DATA
0.25 $/gal steady annual increase - which represents the annual rate for fuel prices in Chicagoland over the past 10 years
0.50 $ average price difference between diesel and gasoline fuels in Chicagoland over the past 10 years (less during summer, more in winter)
7500 city miles / year
5000 highway miles / year
diesel fuel economy 21 city; 28 hwy
V6 gas fuel economy 17 city; 24 hwy

No matter how you tweak the fuel economy values or the number of miles driven, the diesel option doesn't pay for itself against the V6 gas engine. Yes, it will be different against the V8 but not spectacular.

Looking at the screenshot that I attached: by 2022, having driven some 125,000 miles (of which 50,000 highway and 75,000 city), living in Chicago, a driver is projected to have paid 3,040 dollars MORE having driven a Limited V6 JGC over a diesel-powered Limited JGC. The price difference between cars, on the engine choice alone, is invoiced at 4000 dollars. Assume now that you did not want Luxury II (see below in quotes), a 3560 dollar option. All of a sudden the price difference between cars of nearly 7000 dollars will be...covered in 20 years. And really who keeps a car these days 20 years ? All of these people who want to keep the diesel a long time are kidding themselves. The new CAFE-teria standards will impact the lifespan of most vehicles on the road today.

<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="636"><colgroup><col style="mso-width-source:userset;mso-width-alt:20736;width:477pt" width="636"> </colgroup><tbody><tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl63" style="height:15.05pt;width:477pt" height="20" width="636">D. LUXURY GROUP II (AHN) (MSRP $4,000 / INV. $ 3,560) with EXF: (MSRP $3,000 / INV. $ 2,670)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl64" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">8.4" TOUCH SCREEN DISPLAY (RFL)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">AUTO HIGH BEAM HEADLAMP CONTROL (LMS)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">AUTOMATIC HEADLAMP LEVELING SYSTEM (JKJ)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">BI-XENON HID HEADLAMPS (LM2)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">DUAL-PANE PANORAMIC SUNROOF (GWJ)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">NAPPA LEATHER TRIM SEATS W/PERF INSERTS (*DL)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">LED DAYTIME RUNNING HEADLAMPS (LMZ)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">POWER TILT/TELESCOPE STEERING COLUMN (SUB)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">RAIN SENSITIVE WINDSHIELD WIPERS (JHC)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE AND 9-1-1 CALL (RSR)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">UCONNECT 8.4A AM/FM/BT/ACCESS (RA3)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">UCONNECT ACCESS ADVANTAGE (RS7)</td> </tr> <tr style="height:15.05pt" height="20"> <td class="xl65" style="height:15.05pt" height="20">VENTILATED FRONT SEATS (CAJ)</td> </tr> </tbody></table>
 

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Exactly.

What about a comparison to the V6? A $4500 premium over the V6 & diesel fuel often 20% or so more expensive then gas? How long will that take to amortize?

If the V6 4WD averages, say 22 and the diesel say, 26, we have a roughly 15% improvement. If diesel costs 15% more then when, exactly, is the breakeven?
Except no one is paying MSRP. It's $4000 more, $3000 if you're going with a Lux II package. And you'll probably get at least half of that, if not more on resale of the truck. It's never that easy to figure out whether you'll make the best financial decision but when you're talking V6 vs. CRD, you are mostly talking about 2 different classes of vehicles. They *look* the same but I bet the performance characteristics are way different.
 

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And this is the diesel vs. the V8 (same scenario as above)

You break even in fuel costs by 2017 or close to 60,000 miles on the car. If you keep the car longer than that (in time or miles driven) obviously it makes sense.

Look the diesel makes sense for people that spend a long time driving, idling, and towing. Just don't buy it for perceived fuel economy when you live in a major metropolitan area and your only off-road adventure is when the wife hits the curb or there's 2 inches of snow on the ground and the kids wanna go to the snow tubing slope. All other reasons might be acceptable.
 

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