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I don't see how using 4-low would be worse than 4-high, I would assume it's actually better and puts significantly less stress on your transmission. It will also lock your front and rear "axles" (I know they're not axles, I'm not sure the right term to use) together for significantly better traction. Just make sure you take it out of 4-low any time you're on solid, hard, and dry terrain like asphalt. Should be fine in grass, dirt, mud, etc. Also it goes without saying, keep your speed well below 25 mph.

As far as which mode to use, probably I would just leave it in Auto. The Sand and mud modes are really optimized for a standard vehicle load, they're not likely to work right while towing a several-ton load, I don't think. You could try, it probably won't hurt anything, but personally I think I'd just leave it in Auto.

One other trick, throw the shifter into manual mode, and do manual shifts between 1st and 2nd gear as needed, depending on your speed. 3rd gear and above should not be necessary at all for what you're doing, but in Automatic (Drive) mode the transmission will want to use 3rd and 4th gears, which kind of negates the point of using 4-low. When I go offroading, I exclusively only use 1st to 3rd gears (in my 8-speed wk2), there is never a need to use 4th gear, but when I leave the shifter in Drive, the transmission naturally wants to go into 4th gear (and sometimes even 5th gear) above about 6mph, which is not ideal.

Have a Plan B in case you start spinning wheels and digging holes. Have some recovery boards or some other way of getting yourself out, before you begin. Not fun to go find that stuff later after you're already stuck.
 

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There is a method to make it RWD and it doesn't require physical modification, it's called pulling the F77 fuse which disables the "AWD/4x4" system and makes it RWD only. On QDII vehicles this also disables the ELSD but the brake lock differential still functions
This is interesting! So let's say I was offroading in my QT2 WK2, and I shredded a front CV joint. I could just pull fuse F77 and be able to drive my car home in RWD?
 

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What are the physical ramifications for running this way? I cannot imagine Jeep intended for this to be a way to use the vehicle.
I'm curious about this, too. I wouldn't ever plan to drive it like that long-term, but it would be great if it meant the difference between making it back home, or having to call an offroad recovery tow service ($$$). Once I got it home, I wouldn't drive it again until the problem was fixed (it's not my daily driver).

The fuse is labelled "Drivetrain Control Module/Front Axle Disconnect Module"
 
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Well this tow in 4Low gained some traction, didn’t it, lol.
We got a little off-track for sure, but it has spawned some interesting conversation!

What physically makes the vehicle not send power to the front? Cutxh activation or lack of. I see absolutely no reason for there to be an issue. Again the QDII system runs the vehicle in RWD so much that there shouldn't be a single thing wrong with forcing it for RWD especially in a circumstance like mentioned above.

What people fail to realize is this transfer case is used in other vehicles which have a selectable rwd only mode, its simply not activated/used on the WK2 platform. No clutch engagement = rwd. F77 fuse = no clutch engagement
In that case, it sounds like one could use a fuse-tap on F77, and wire a toggle switch to the cabin to trigger forced-RWD on the fly. I'm not sure I'll volunteer to be the first guinea pig, though (and who knows what would happen if you did that while the car was on)
 
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