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Laredo 4x4
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently got my tyres replaced and they keep me waiting quite some time. The tyres were not the problem, it was the technology they had problems with. I thought after this much time they would have encountered this before. If only they had've asked me.

Problem 1: They did not know how to reset the TPMS. The guys had to refer to some video that sounded like Arnold Schwarzenegger giving them pointers.

Problem 2: They were not aware of the Auto-Park feature when the seat belt is removed and the driver door opened.

Here is the dashcam video with some disrespectful words about the Jeep.

https://youtu.be/rbEAQp2iJ-M
 

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Super Moderator
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Yea, there's nothing to reset on the TPMS. And most shops don't know about things like the air suspension mode to be in for changing tires/alignment or about the "unique" features of the MY14-15 shifter after the recall software is applied. No surprise...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For those that are not familiar with the TPMS low pressure warning, here is the extract from the manual:

Once the low tire pressure
warning has been illuminated, the tire pressure must be
increased to the recommended cold tire pressure in order
for the Tire Pressure Monitoring Telltale Light to be
turned off. The system will automatically update and the
Tire Pressure Monitoring Telltale Light will extinguish
once the updated tire pressures have been received. The
vehicle may need to be driven for up to 20 minutes above
15 mph (24 km/h) to receive this information.
 

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For those that are not familiar with the TPMS low pressure warning, here is the extract from the manual:

Once the low tire pressure
warning has been illuminated, the tire pressure must be
increased to the recommended cold tire pressure in order
for the Tire Pressure Monitoring Telltale Light to be
turned off. The system will automatically update and the
Tire Pressure Monitoring Telltale Light will extinguish
once the updated tire pressures have been received. The
vehicle may need to be driven for up to 20 minutes above
15 mph (24 km/h) to receive this information.
Yes, you put air in the tire, check pressure and drive, thats all.
 

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Unless you take it directly to the Jeep dealer, you can't expect the auto tech to know all the features of every vehicle, as much as we would like them to.
 

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125 Posts
found this thread though a search - having some aftermarket wheels with OEM TPMS sensors installed. Will I just need to drive the vehicle for "up to 20 minutes" for the system to reset, and communicate with the new TPMS sensors? Since it's not a Jeep dealer I'm not sure they'll know what the hell to do.
 

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Premium Member
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150 Posts
If they're not the same TPMS sensors that came with the vehicle, you might have to drop by a dealer to have them programmed. When I replaced my wheels, I ordered new OEM sensors and hoped the system would recognize, but it wouldn't. 20 min at the dealer, they programmed them in and I was good to go.
 
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If they're not the same TPMS sensors that came with the vehicle, you might have to drop by a dealer to have them programmed. When I replaced my wheels, I ordered new OEM sensors and hoped the system would recognize, but it wouldn't. 20 min at the dealer, they programmed them in and I was good to go.
Ah, crap, was hoping I wouldn't have to do that... We'll see. Maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised and these dudes will be able to get it setup.
 

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Lifer: Old Geezer
Overland
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Ah, crap, was hoping I wouldn't have to do that... We'll see. Maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised and these dudes will be able to get it setup.
Depends on the year of the vehicle--which defines the sensor/pickup type.
Don't recall when they cut over to the self programming, but by May 2013, all you need is compatible sensors and a few miles of driving.

And if they don't work after about a day, any good tire shop will fix it.
Some tire shops carry the OEM sensors, some the compatible alternatives.
Both work just fine. If your tire shop doesn't know the answer, there are a lot of tire shops out there that do.
 
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