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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a long story. I have a 1992 Cherokee base model with an 8.25 Chrysler rear end and 9” brakes NON ABS. I bought it in hopes of making it a casual driver. After I bought the vehicle, I tuned it up and changed the brakes. When I drove to check in the brakes, it started off fine. I went on an outing to the hills to see what my jeep could do. About 20 miles from the house, my brakes started smelling hot. Then there was a brake lock up. The back passenger brake got so hot, it started locking up and rubbing bad. I stopped and let it cool. Took off for home and kept doing it. I had to stop a lot and let it cool just to get home. This is all on the passenger side. But obviously work was done to both sides.

Parts changed;
NEW ROTORS = SAME PROBLEM
BRAKE CYLINDERS = SAME

BRAKE PADS
SPRING KIT =SAME

BRAKE BOOSTER
MASTER CYLINDER
PROPORTIONING VALVE
WHEEL CYLINDERS AGAIN
CLEANED BRAKE LINES
NEW BRAKE PADS
BRAKE LINE (body to axle)
SPRING KIT= SAME PROBLEM

Next to the mechanic

NEW AXLE SEAL
27 SPLINE YUKON SHAFT
AXLE BEARINGS = SAME

Les Schwab brake guy told me he would charge me 650.00 for doing the same thing. He said he honestly doesn’t know what is wrong, He thought I should buy a better quality spring kit so, I did and it seemed to have fixed it. I then went and got a new set of drums because the others were warped, now the drivers side is doing it and the passenger side is fine.
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This doesn’t heat up all the way around. It heats up in the same spot on the drum. Which is why I did the axle and bearings. Oh and before someone asks if I bled the brakes, I have gone through about 3 quarts of PrestonE DOT 3 brake fluid and cleaned the brakes with brake cleaner each time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
BTW, before anyone asks, everything done to one side was done to the other the axle was done on both sides as well.
 

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How tight are you adjusting the shoe to drum clearance?
Are you buying all those brake parts from the same place?
Any problems with bleeding the brakes?
Before assembling the new parts did you clean the backing plates squeaky clean with brake cleaner?
Did you use high temperature grease on the metal parts of the shoes where they contact the backing plate?
Are you sure the emergency brake is not binding?

I had a similar problem after i did a rear brake job on my XJ with new hardware kits from O'Reily, drums, cylinders and shoes.
During the initial test drive the rear driver side drum over heated enough to turn it blue.
Pull the drum and every thing seemed normal so put it back to gather, same thing.

Pulled the drum again and the only thing different from the other pass. side was the star wheel shoe adjuster was maxed out with only a little adjustment left to pull in the shoes.
Bought a new drum and tried again, same thing.
I forced the shoe adjuster until it bottomed out pulling the shoes in a little more. That fixed it and haven't had the problem since and with the shoes wearing more created even more shoe pad to drum clearance.
Only thing i could think of is either the hardware kit's auto adjuster or the shoes or the drums were out of spec.
I should of bought another hardware kit from a different place but it finally worked ok.

I was gonna mention changing the proportioning valve but it looks like you've already been there.
Plus i'd think if it was a prop. valve issue both rear brakes would be affected.

If both rear brakes bled without a problem then that would seem to indicate no fluid obstructions.
Off the top of my head things to check:
-make sure all the springs are in correctly especially those two big main springs, they're the ones that pull the shoes in.
-make sure the emergency brake is not binding causing the problem
-make sure the auto adj. star wheel and its pawl work smoothly and as intended
-that semi circle pulley needs to be firmly seated in its slot and can easily slip out of it during assembly. I use a clamp to keep it in place for the rest of the assemble.
-try a looser drum to shoe clearance adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I adjust till there is no more adjustment then click 3 clicks off. I have carquest brakes, springs and drums. After I cleaned the lines, I have no problems bleeding the brakes. I literally took a wire brush to loosen everything up and cleaned with brake cleaner. Some places of contact were almost taken to the metal. No grease. I have noticed the lower spring catching on the park brake.
 

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Are you sure the self adjuster assembly is installed correctly? If you adjust them properly initially, it sounds like the self adjuster is continually tightening the shoes. I don't know if the jeep uses primary & secondary brake shoes. I recall brake shoes came in pairs, each pair consisting of a primary and secondary shoe. The primary shoe was for the forward position, it had a smaller strip of the friction material and the edge was red. The secondary shoe was for the rearward position, had longer strip of of the friction material and the edge was black.
 

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OPer, can you post a clear picture of your brake installation based primarily on this:
...I have noticed the lower spring catching on the park brake...
In the meantime try adjusting a little more clearance between the shoes and the drums.
I adjust mine until the drum moves freely back and forth with only a very slight amount of friction and then make sure the star wheel auto adjuster also adjusts freely.

Are you sure the emergency brake is not binding?
One way to test the installation is to engage the emergency brake with drum removed and see if the shoes spread.
Releasing the emergency brake should retract the shoes to their home position.
Caution: never press the brake pedal with the drums removed.

Its not clear but the brake shoe's backing metal where it contacts the main backing plate should be greased with a high temperature grease and the star wheel auto adjuster threads also.
Most auto part stores carry high temperature grease designed for brake work.

These Bendix drum brakes can sometimes be a PITA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Star is the right way. I will test the brakes in a few days when I get the chance. I haven’t done it but why not hit the brakes without the drum? Here is the one question no one has asked. Why is the heat only hitting one area? Why isn’t it all the way around the drum? The drum is brand new, bad brake drum?
 

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There's a chance pressing the brake pedal could cause the brake cylinder pistons far enough out to squirt out brake fluid especially if there's a concern with the hardware install.

Without going back and reading the posts i thought this was the 2nd new brake drum?
In my case above the drum heated up equally across its entire circumference which i concluded the new star adjuster was out of tolerance, basically a bad new part.
I didn't want to trust the old drum because the heat could of warped it out of shape.

In your case it could be a warped drum or the shoes and/or hardware are not properly installed.
Only way to tell if the drum is bad is to mount it on a lathe and check it with a dial indicator or just replace it.

Some things to keep in mind
-As Mr.GEE^ said there are primary and secondary brake shoes in the kit with different lengths of friction material.
The shoe that has a shorter strip of friction material should be installed towards the front of the vehicle.

-The star wheel adjusters are different meaning one needs to go on the right side of the vehicle and the other on the left side.
One has right handed threads while the other has left hand threads.
There's usually a L and R stamped somewhere on the adjusters.

-The spring that goes above and across the star adjuster needs to be installed the correct way to prevent an interference binding of the adjuster.

-Both the backing plate contact pads and the adjuster threads should be lubed with brake or high temperature grease.

Without being there in person the only thing that we can get a rough idea of the installation is by posting detailed pictures.
Doing a drum brake job especially for the first time can be confusing and frustrating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There's a chance pressing the brake pedal could cause the brake cylinder pistons far enough out to squirt out brake fluid especially if there's a concern with the hardware install.

Without going back and reading the posts i thought this was the 2nd new brake drum?
In my case above the drum heated up equally across its entire circumference which i concluded the new star adjuster was out of tolerance, basically a bad new part.
I didn't want to trust the old drum because the heat could of warped it out of shape.

In your case it could be a warped drum or the shoes and/or hardware are not properly installed.
Only way to tell if the drum is bad is to mount it on a lathe and check it with a dial indicator or just replace it.

Some things to keep in mind
-As Mr.GEE^ said there are primary and secondary brake shoes in the kit with different lengths of friction material.
The shoe that has a shorter strip of friction material should be installed towards the front of the vehicle.

-The star wheel adjusters are different meaning one needs to go on the right side of the vehicle and the other on the left side.
One has right handed threads while the other has left hand threads.
There's usually a L and R stamped somewhere on the adjusters.

-The spring that goes above and across the star adjuster needs to be installed the correct way to prevent an interference binding of the adjuster.

-Both the backing plate contact pads and the adjuster threads should be lubed with brake or high temperature grease.

Without being there in person the only thing that we can get a rough idea of the installation is by posting detailed pictures.
Doing a drum brake job especially for the first time can be confusing and frustrating.
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so, on my quest, I noticed several things. One, the back of the spring was catching on the park brake. I pulled it off and bent the hook on the spring further down and applied a very thin coat of brake grease to the area. Two, the brakes were post menopausal and dry as heck. I used a pry bar to gently pry the brakes to add a thin layer of grease to six spots on the back of the pads. The brown coating on the shoes acts as a glue when hot and makes the brakes stick. Three, the park brake spring wraps around the bottom of the axle, the axle is not flat but has a sloping like a cone which draws the arm closer to the spring that is rubbing. I greased the spring. I took it out and no rub. Prior to leaving, I took a thermal reading on the drum at 79 degrees. I drove approx 5.82 miles and applied the brakes 9 times from 55 mph to stop. I returned and took a thermal reading on both sides the temperatures were close to even. Averaging around 172 degrees on drivers side and 168 on pass, I noticed no hint of rubbing.
 

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So its fixed?

Offhand again without being there and It could just be the picture but something doesn't look right about that pawl spring.
The adjuster's star wheel pawl tensioner spring looks to be installed backwards wrong.
Again and could be wrong but from the pic and it could be an optical illusion but it looks like the spring is binding the star wheel adjuster.


It should look something like this:
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So its fixed?

Offhand again without being there and It could just be the picture but something doesn't look right about that pawl spring.
The adjuster's star wheel pawl tensioner spring looks to be installed backwards wrong.
Again and could be wrong but from the pic and it could be an optical illusion but it looks like the spring is binding the star wheel adjuster.


It should look something like this:
View attachment 237754
So its fixed?

Offhand again without being there and It could just be the picture but something doesn't look right about that pawl spring.
The adjuster's star wheel pawl tensioner spring looks to be installed backwards wrong.
Again and could be wrong but from the pic and it could be an optical illusion but it looks like the spring is binding the star wheel adjuster.


It should look something like this:
View attachment 237754

Word of advice…. Whatever you do, KEEP THE OLD EQUIPMENT. They do not make these anymore. The Mopar service department tech said I was at the mercy of after market suppliers and they don’t make them right.
 

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So it looks like the drum it binding in one spot according to the photo posted above. I've heard several accounts of drums being stored on their end causing issues. The XJ is old, drums don't need replaced very often, and so drums sit on the shelf for a very long time - warping. Have you have the drums tossed on the lathe to see if them need trued up before use?
 

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Word of advice…. Whatever you do, KEEP THE OLD EQUIPMENT. They do not make these anymore. The Mopar service department tech said I was at the mercy of after market suppliers and they don’t make them right.
Yep i ran into that with my last XJ's rear brake job with an out of tolerance adjuster not allowing the shoes to retract enough.
For the most part though the aftermarket hardware kits and shoes do work from my past experience brake jobs on my XJ.
With approaching 380K miles on my XJ i've done a few of them.

I hope the shoes you're using aren't from Auto Zone.
The one's i got from them were so called semi-metallic but it was too much of a good thing and much worse the brake dust was unbelievable causing grinding and squeaking.
Had to clean the pile of brake dust out after few hundred miles and had enough and replaced them with organic brake shoes which i think is what the OEMs were.
 
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