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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have searched already but a more specific question to do with the 2014+ V6 towing capacity. It has 6200 pounds and there are 2 travel trailers I have my eye on:

1. Winnebago 1700BH: Dry Weight 3010. GVWR 3800. 21 feet length. This one I know the V6 will do fine.

2. Winnebago 2100BH: Dry Weight 3760. GVWR 7,000!!!. 22 feet length. This one confuses me. They're both essentially the same trailer except the 2100BH has a slide out and 2 axles.

I have towed pop ups and travel trailers for years so I know about weights - ignore dry weight, watch payload capacity, etc. but I have never added 3000+ pounds (the 2100BH dry weight and GVWR difference is 3240 pounds) to even my largest travel trailer (which wasn't that large).

Questions is: do you think the 2100BH would be fine to tow with the 6200 lb rated V6 unless I pile a bunch of rocks in it?
 

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GVWR is a maximum. ;) You should be fine, but keep in mind that for travel trailers, it's not just about weight. You have a big sail back there, so the actual design of the trailer will affect towing performance. You absolutely need a WDH for these and you really need Factory Towing, too, to insure that the cooling, electrical and brakes are optimized for the task. The V6 is very capable for towing, but you should never figure on the maximum as a goal, regardless of engine. Those numbers, while "safe" are optimistic relative to performance.
 
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Are they different lengths? 17’ vs 21’ or 22’? I find it odd the model starting with 17 is actually 21’.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Are they different lengths? 17’ vs 21’?
No, one is 21 feet and the other is 22 feet.

I always just pay attention to GVWR of a trailer as that is the safest number to pay attention to but if you look at the first one I have 800 pounds to add to the trailer. On the 2nd one which is 700+ pounds heavier dry weight has 3,000+ of capacity....I thought, "I could fill and be fine with 800 pounds of gear and extra but wouldn't suddenly fill 3k pounds worth." It just may be one of those times where I don't pay attention to the GVWR as much as usual.
 

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2 things to keep in mind that are affecting the numbers:

1) the slide adds weight over the 1700BH

2) the 2100BH has 2 axles carrying the load vs. just the single axle on the 1700BH.

If you look at the tire and load label on the 2100BH it will look something like this example:



They are highlighting the 3500 lbs per axle. I have seen that alot in smaller trailers where the GVWR and GAWR is basically the axle rating vs. dry weight. The lightweight double axle trailers can carry a ridiculous amount of extra cargo.

I have a 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee V6 also and having extra capacity in the trailer helps in keeping the Jeep's total weight down (can move gear to the trailer while en route).
 

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I am also looking at the 2100bh and have a 2018 JGC V6 gas with tow group IV which has “rear load levelling suspension”. I was wondering if anybody knew if this does the same as an equalizer hitch or if I still require one of those. Thanks for any help.
 

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I am also looking at the 2100bh and have a 2018 JGC V6 gas with tow group IV which has “rear load levelling suspension”. I was wondering if anybody knew if this does the same as an equalizer hitch or if I still require one of those. Thanks for any help.
No, it does not do the same as the equalizer hitch.
 

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No, it does not do the same as the equalizer hitch.
Correct, the auto level will help with some sag from any tongue weight but definitely does not replace the need for a weight distribution hitch. I would also go one step farther and look for a weight distribution hitch that also has sway control functionally. And no, not all hitches are created equal, you will shell out 500+ for a nice Weight distribution hitch with sway control.

Several I would recommend include: equalizer, blue ox sway pro (what I bought for my Ram), Anderson. If you want to really spend some bucks but get the best out their look at a Hensley or ProPride but they are $$$$.
 

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I am also looking at the 2100bh and have a 2018 JGC V6 gas with tow group IV which has “rear load levelling suspension”. I was wondering if anybody knew if this does the same as an equalizer hitch or if I still require one of those. Thanks for any help.
Load Leveling and Weight Distribution are two entirely different things. If your tongue weight exceeds 350 lbs, you need the WDH.
 

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I tow occasional heavy loads with my 3.6 and it does great. I'm and advocate of the 3.6 and for most instances it's all folks need. If I were planning on getting a travel trailer and a new Jeep and doing a significant amount of miles I'd be shopping a 5.7 though. I think it would make things more comfortable and overall less strain. Plus heavy duty brakes from the factory are a bonus.
 

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Thank you for confirming what I had expected (but had hoped it did replace the WDH). I have looked and had narrowed to the Blue Ox, recommended by the dealer, and the Anderson, by my brother in law. I will definitely have the sway control as I have seen a SUV and trailer laying on its side due to wind on the highway. Thanks for your help
 

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I use a blue ox for my Ram 1500 Sport towing a 32' TT Weighs about 7800 loaded and have been very happy with the performance.
 

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Same as most others are saying, my top concern would be stopping, not pulling. I think you'll be fine with the weight you're looking at, especially paying attention to payload, tire pressures, correct hitch, etc
 

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Thank you for confirming what I had expected (but had hoped it did replace the WDH). I have looked and had narrowed to the Blue Ox, recommended by the dealer, and the Anderson, by my brother in law. I will definitely have the sway control as I have seen a SUV and trailer laying on its side due to wind on the highway. Thanks for your help
Your V6 JGH should be able to pull any of the mentioned TT's. The longest is 21'11" and just above what I set as my cut-off of 21' due to potential side winds or Semi's with the relatively short wheelbase of the Grand Cherokee.

My owners manual says a WDH is required for loads exceeding 5000 lbs but the weight distribution and ant-sway factors of all the hitches mentioned will make towing a lot less of a white-knuckle experience, even when under the "WDH required" weight. I went with the Andersen Hitch due to its good reputation and lighter weight (under 50 lbs) which is added to the trailer tongue weight - gives me an additional 50 lbs capacity for cargo in the Jeep.

Plan on keeping the loaded trailer weight at or below 80% of your max towing capability and tongue weight at 10-15% of trailer weight (most recommend around 12% for good stability).
 

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2014 Overland 4x4 with factory tow package - 3.6 V6 with 8 speed automatic and Quadra-Lift.

I'm about to embark on an RV purchase.

2011 Coachmen 230BH.
Dry weight 3800#
Tongue weight 450#
Total length tongue plus box = 26.9ft. (Box ~23ft)
Estimating another ~850 - 950# for family and cargo.

I'll be adding an Equalizer WD 4 point system, not cheaping out here. Assume I should disable Q-Lift in the menu before tweaking the WD system?

I'm sure on hills the V6 will be hunting for gears, but hoping this rig will work well for summer family camping.
 

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I think you're pushing things with a rig that large, Mark. Relative to your question about dialing in the WDH, you need to hook up with it "approximate" and drive around the block. Then tweak it. There's a detailed thread in the Suspension/Drivetrain/Brakes/Tires/Wheels sub-forum written a couple of years ago or so that describes the process. You don't "disable" QL.
 

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I think you're pushing things with a rig that large, Mark. Relative to your question about dialing in the WDH, you need to hook up with it "approximate" and drive around the block. Then tweak it. There's a detailed thread in the Suspension/Drivetrain/Brakes/Tires/Wheels sub-forum written a couple of years ago or so that describes the process. You don't "disable" QL.
Hi Jim,

Thanks for your feedback. I've read your comments on this forum in prior posts and you always add solid detailed feedback.

I don't disagree with your comment above, ideally a sub 4000k# dry 19ft or 21ft trailer had been what I was targeting.

However this one came up locally, private sale, I've checked it out twice and has a very attractive asking price. It is a slightly longer box for the short wheelbase WK2, but the weight is in the ballpark. Dry weight plus tongue weight = 70% of TV capacity.

I welcome any wisdom, learning as I go here. Growing up, my father took the family RVing all the time, trying to do the same now with my family.
 

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Mark,

A 27' overall trailer IMO is pushing it with a 114.8" wheelbase. People do it but I wouldn't. Also, it's likely the weights you have been quoted may not include the trailer as optioned (manufacturers tend to do that) so your trailer and tongue weight may be closer to 4200 lbs and 600 lbs once the options (300-400 lbs) and batteries (100 lbs) are added (and that doesn't include your personal items (typically 300-500 lbs) or any water (10 gal to flush the toilet enroute and 6 gal in the water heater). Add also, the WDH which is considered cargo so add another 100+ lbs of payload for that.


Make sure you have the real numbers for the trailer you're considering. Check the payload capacity of your JGC (driver doorpost) and do the math to be sure it will work and though the V6 may pull the load the actual tongue weight, your vehicle's payload and overall length of the TT may be the potentially limiting factors.
 

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I'm with everyone else here that it's going to struggle. I tow a 22ft deck over enclosed trailer. Weights in at 3500lbs empty and is 9.6ft tall. With my overland with a 5.7 I struggle with hills and on Ramps. Its foot to the floor on the on ramps and trying to keep it in second to get up to speed. Once up to speed it's not bad but I'm holding 2200rpms at 70mph on flat ground. Sway is a big issue. I do run a sway bar and that helps alot but short wheel base is the killer. If I add cargo it gets worse. My Denali with a 6.2 and a longer wheel base pulls it with ease. Only use my jeep when I cant get my Denali.
Good luck
 

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Usually I have my srt but...
I had a Loaner with the v6 and 8 speed tranny

Just drove 850 miles with my 24 FT Enclosed snowmobile trailer FULLY Loaded.

Trailer easily around 6300-6500 pounds loaded....

It 100% pulled just fine no issues. This is being on the internet that all have 70 mph speed limits.. No need for a dedicated pickup unless your towing 8,000 pounds in my opinion.. The 8 speed and auto leveling rear suspension this loaner had make a huge difference.

Let the engine work. Running at 3,500 RPMS for 2-3 minutes is not harmful. Flooring it for 20-40 is just fine, this is a modern engine with a large cooling system. Engine is so quiet you can barely hear or really feel the tranny downshift through inclines and is butter smooth... its FINE

Educate yourself on how to load the trailer as proper weight distribution is absolutely critical a brake controller is all critical ($120 - Jeep is already pre-wired for one.
 
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