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I broke a hose on the '96 XJ replacing my crankshaft position sensor. It's at the top of the engine all the way back to the firewall. This hose is made for heat. On the right side it is clamped onto a small metal tube that goes down and travels along with the fuel lines going all the way to the gas tank. From the right side the hose travels to the left side of the engine bay and plugs into the top of some kind of black cylindrical object that's about the size of a football underneath the windshield fluid reservoir. I'm guessing this is some kind of evap reclamation hose but I'm really not sure. The guy at the parts store couldn't identify it but he said Jeeps really weren't his thing.

What is this hose called please?

219376
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Best I've been able to narrow it down so far is that a parts guy at the local Chrysler dealership narrowed it down to Chrysler part number 4854149 but said they didn't have it.

If you go to vpartsinc.com and put the number in they have it described as a vacuum fitting, but no picture, priced at $50 bucks to my door, which sucks.

Is there any way anybody knows how to find a picture of this part somewhere on the net? After all this searching I'm still not sure if that's even the right part number without seeing a picture of it.
 

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2019 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk
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Won’t be able to help ID the part but if it’s just a vacuum hose can’t you just match the inner diameter of it with something similar at an autoparts store then trim/cut to length? Vacuum hoses are pretty common.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wish I could. As it goes right over the engine it's made for heat which means it's not only a shaped hose but made out of something more solid than your typical rubber hose.
 

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I'd splice it right at that area. The rest of the line can remain intact. Less heat down there. Even cars with common vacuum lines years ago ran on top of the motor.
 
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