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Discussion Starter #1
With my V6 in Sport mode its 6 seconds give or take a couple tenths of a second.
Not stellar by the Hemi and other high HP engines but good enough for me as my gear head speed days are over.
Haha, still can't resist pressing that there Sport mode button.

A hell of a lot better than my old 4 lunger Patriot which i seem to remember was around 11 seconds.
 

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Wow, that’s amazing, I always thought 8.4 seconds was the quoted figure.

I know my 2011 3.6 Laredo isn’t that fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow, that’s amazing, I always thought 8.4 seconds was the quoted figure.
I know my 2011 3.6 Laredo isn’t that fast.
Could be in 2016 FCA upgraded the Pentastar 3.6 by:
-adding variable valve lift VVL in addition to upgrading variable valve timing VVT
-Increasing the compression ratio to 11.3:1 compared to the previous which was 10.2:1
-new longer intake manifold for boosting torque
- 8 hole fuel injectors
-cooled EGR
-low end torque was increased almost 15%

Yeah i was a little surprised it did that good, was expecting worse times even though this thing pulls when i get on it.
It was done on a lonely level country road, stop watch, Auto 4x4 mode, Sport mode, 1/4 tank of 93 octane and on a windless day.
Did this a few times with slowest run at around 6.4 seconds, the fastest 6.1 seconds with the average around 6.2 seconds.
Been averaging 24 to 25 mpg combined depending on wind direction and velocity.

Really curious to see other 2016 to 2019 3.6's 0 to 60 times.
 

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Your 3.6 V6 is faster than a 5.7hemi V8... which do 0-60 in the mid 6second range.
The fastest I've seen on the internets for a 3.6 GC 0-60 was 7.15seconds , on a 20*F day, and going slightly downhill.
Every test/report I've seen puts them over 7 seconds 0-60.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Interesting.
Keep in mind the hemi engine adds a lot more weight to the Jeep among other variables which could slow off the line times a little.
I'd think where the hemi shines is top end speed.

Maybe the 93 octane helped, gonna try again with my usual 87 octane and see what happens.
 

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Higher octane will not really do anything for an engine not designed to use it...it burns slower so that higher compression engines don't knock from pre-detonation. Even the Hemi doesn't need it...
 

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Interesting.
Keep in mind the hemi engine adds a lot more weight to the Jeep among other variables which could slow off the line times a little.
I'd think where the hemi shines is top end speed.

Maybe the 93 octane helped, gonna try again with my usual 87 octane and see what happens.
The HEMI also has a taller 3.09 axle ratio for gas mileage and low rpm cruising vs. the shorter version in the V6.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Higher octane will not really do anything for an engine not designed to use it...it burns slower so that higher compression engines don't knock from pre-detonation. Even the Hemi doesn't need it...
I will say this in normal driving i don't notice any difference with my V6 between 87 and 93 octane.

But with 93 octane that would depend on whether or not the PCM tweeks the timing and/or other engine variables dependent on an active knock sensor feed back loop during say WOT. Don't know one way or the other.

Back in the olden carb days with an 11:1+ compression ratio the fuel normally required a higher octane rating to prevent knocking.
The distributors back then typically incorporated vacuum and centrifugal mechanisms which more or less produced a 'fixed' ignition timing advance curve.
The engine's real time vacuum was the only ignition timing variable.

Now a days the PCM controls ignition timing, injector timing, Variable Valve Timing and now Variable Valve Lift.
The PCM can tweek all those timings on the fly depending on variables like engine loading, rpm, speed, WOT, etc. and maybe even knock sensor feed back?

I know my F150's V8 coyote engine has noticeably more low end torque using 93 octane.
The owner's manual only states 'do not use fuels below 87 octane'.
The first time i filled up my F150's tank with 93 octane and got on it, (WTF!) rear tire squeaks now when it shifts into 2nd gear. Something its never done with 87 octane.
 

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A few months ago Car & Driver had an interesting article about using premium in vehicles that don’t require it. They ran dyno tests to see if there was any real benefit. One vehicle was a Charger with the HEMI and it only gained a few HP with 93 which led them to conclude that premium didn’t really benefit this engine tuned for 89, which agrees with the owners manual.
 

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In another forum I participate in, the makers of a popular tuning system did tests and verified there was no benefit to running higher octane in a vehicle designed for (or tuned for) 87. And that's a vehicle with a 4 cyl twin turbo. It didn't hurt to run it, of course, but the only real benefit was to the filling station/oil company. They did see gains with 91/93 if a tune was applied, but not with the OEM factory setup. I only ever ran 87 in my MY12 JGC Hemi, never bothering to run the "recommended" 89 since 87 was listed as acceptable.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A few months ago Car & Driver had an interesting article about using premium in vehicles that don’t require it. They ran dyno tests to see if there was any real benefit. One vehicle was a Charger with the HEMI and it only gained a few HP with 93 which led them to conclude that premium didn’t really benefit this engine tuned for 89, which agrees with the owners manual.
Well it was a few more HP albeit it could of been within the dyno's +/- error tolerance.
I'd also like to see if the torque curve was improved as well.
 
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