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2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit
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I don't know guys. Maybe I am crazy, but I drove one fully charged for 30 minutes and then a V8 immediately after and then back to the 4Xe and thought the 4Xe was a dog compared to the V8...

...I also drove an XC60 PHEV and that is light years ahead of the 4Xe for sure. More power, more range, better mileage, smoother transition off battery only. And it costs less.
...
Depending on what mode you are in, yeah, the lag can suck, but you can prevent that.
As for the Volvo, first XC60 is smaller, XC90 is more like a JGC, they are 3 row, but not as long as a L.
And a PHEV T8 XC90 is $80,000.

Plus the Volvo has a 2.0 turbo 4 up front with 300ish hp, and depending on the year either 87, or 149 hp EV in the rear.
Overall it works very well, but can't compare to the Jeep's drivetrain with both ICE and EV going through the transmission/transfercase and complete 4X4 systems.
Volvo is FWD on gasoline, RWD on EV, and can combine for eAWD. On the road, they are very nice. But I'd take the Jeep every day when the going got rough.
I have a 2019 Volvo S90 (their biggest sedan) with T8 PHEV. 2.0 up front, with turbocharger AND supercharger (for low end torque) with something like 313 hp and the 87hp rear EV motor. It only has a 10.4KWh battery good for about 21 miles under ideal conditions. The car weighs 4700 pounds net, not gross.
I never get under 30MPG, and ONCE got 40MPG over 830 miles without charging. Local driving works out close to 70MPGe (EV as fuel) down to maybe 40MPG when I burn more fuel.
PLUS that 2.0 with EV dragged that 2½tons of car,fuel, and me down the ¼ mile in under 13.3 seconds
The system in the Jeeps is very, very similar all the way around, but better integrated into the 4X4 systems.
 

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2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
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629 Posts
That is a side benefit. The overall economy is the real win. 5.7 peak power, 6.4 peak torque, better than 2.0 economy.
The only real downside is what you mentioned first. It is complicated and expensive.
OK, makes more sense now, still, why not forgetting about those tiny batteries and simply offering more traditional drive train options for now?
I don't want to plug it in all the time...
Definitely a downsized turbo 4 cylinder, the current Pentastar engine is just so boring (to me at least)...

Just read this in a Road & Track article, definitely cool tech!

About that powertrain; across all trims, the Grand Cherokee 4xe leverages the 2.0-liter direct-injection inline-four borrowed from a handful of other Jeep products, including the recent Wrangler plug-in hybrid. It pairs that mill to a motor behind the engine, integrated with the transmission, which replaces the torque converter. A separate generator/motor applies torque to the front axle and replaces the starter. The powertrain mates to an 8-speed transmission with a two-speed transfer case. Steel skid plates button up the whole package, protecting the batteries and powertrain.
 

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I don't know guys. Maybe I am crazy, but I drove one fully charged for 30 minutes and then a V8 immediately after and then back to the 4Xe and thought the 4Xe was a dog compared to the V8. I really, REALLY, wanted to like the hybrid but was not impressed with the acceleration, lag that it takes the ICE to turn on when you press the throttle, and general buzziness of the 4 banger. I thought it would be cool to be able to not use any gas during the work week, but it just isn't quite there yet, so I bought a SR Hemi.
I also drove an XC60 PHEV and that is light years ahead of the 4Xe for sure. More power, more range, better mileage, smoother transition off battery only. And it costs less.
Not trying to troll, just my experience.
Also if you haven't checked it out, the 4Xe forum has a ton of good info
Could be a seat of the pants thing, or overall perception of the experience. Was the lag you talk about the start/stop system, or lag in the hybrid power delivery?

Definitely at higher elevations the 4xe is going to outpull the Hemi by quite a margin. My WK2 Trailhawk with Hemi is much livelier at sea level than it is at 7200 ft where I live. About a 3% power loss for every 1000 ft in elevation gain over sea level HP. The 4xe with the turbo base engine and EV would only suffer a small fraction of that. Not that I've had the occasion to do this much, but I do wonder on how the 4xe would tow say a 5K lb trailer up mountain passes.
 

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2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit
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Could be a seat of the pants thing, or overall perception of the experience. Was the lag you talk about the start/stop system, or lag in the hybrid power delivery?
...
I assume, and was responding to them as if it was lag on pulling out on EV and waiting for the ICE to kick in, which you can prevent with the push of a button for whateverthemodeiscalled.
But EV, no lag there, beats a HEMI any day on response. I've been in and driven enough EVs to really love the response. I just wish my personal PHEV had more power on the EV end.
Sign me up for the new E-Ray!
 

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My only guess, is that the 3 row has a different floor pan in the back for more leg room or something like that.
It does have a different floor plan as necessitated by the third row seating. That's also why the spare went outside.
 

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Oh absolutely the floor is different.
but they knew about the 4Xe Grand Cherokee before the WL release. They could have absolutely configured it to work if they wanted to.
I don’t think adding the 4Xe drive train was an afterthought.
 

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'22 JGC 4xe & '14 JGC LTD; '09 Subaru Forester; RIP '05 Subaru Legacy STI EVO
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nope
When EV battery is drained, there is not magic "always". If it is drained, and you do a long acceleration after acceleration, you will be without EV power.
But it always comes back during normal driving, so effectively you have enough for brief pull out type power just about always.
I am not saying that's not true but it hasn't happened to me yet and there's plenty of people on the other board who swear that in practice, it is not an issue. As far as my experience is concerned, I've driven plenty of highway miles on < 1% and never lacked power. Maybe at the drag strip after multiple consecutive runs, but then again, even F1 cars' performance suffers after repeated standing starts.

But why muddy the waters because that is what all the nay-sayers will remember...

I am sure that the new C 63 AMG is @tallguy 's most ardent automotive desire of "higher performing hybrid". But...it is still a 4 cylinder.
 

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It is the same way all the time. It is ALWAYS a hybrid and you will always have 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp below your right shoe.
Does the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp apply only when there is energy in the battery? If those ratings also apply when only running the ICE, I'd say that's pretty impressive. Even if those ratings only apply when there's charge in the battery and working in combination with the ICE, I'd still say that's pretty impressive... it beats my EcoDiesel with 420 lb-ft and 240 hp and 34 mpg.

Since you say it's always a hybrid, and you also say it always has 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp, would that mean the ICE's ratings actually surpass the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp?
 

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Does the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp apply only when there is energy in the battery? If those ratings also apply when only running the ICE, I'd say that's pretty impressive. Even if those ratings only apply when there's charge in the battery and working in combination with the ICE, I'd still say that's pretty impressive... it beats my EcoDiesel with 420 lb-ft and 420 hp and 34 mpg.

Since you say it's always a hybrid, and you also say it always has 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp, would that mean the ICE's ratings actually surpass the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp?
I highly doubt that you will get 375hp from a 2.0l turbo from Jeep... not a Mercedes engine :)
So if you were to deplete the battery in electric only mode you would not have the added electric moto power of $ 120hp (I think).
I have no clue actually, just making assumptions, so someone jump in who knows, thanks.
 

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Does the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp apply only when there is energy in the battery? If those ratings also apply when only running the ICE, I'd say that's pretty impressive. Even if those ratings only apply when there's charge in the battery and working in combination with the ICE, I'd still say that's pretty impressive... it beats my EcoDiesel with 420 lb-ft and 420 hp and 34 mpg.

Since you say it's always a hybrid, and you also say it always has 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp, would that mean the ICE's ratings actually surpass the 475 lb-ft and 375 bhp?
I answered some of these questions in this thread, around pages 3 - 5 where you also participated. Neither the facts in that discussion nor my answer have changed.
In regards to that last statement: non sequitur.

 

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I answered some of these questions in this thread, around pages 3 - 5 where you also participated. Neither the facts in that discussion nor my answer have changed.
In regards to that last statement: non sequitur.

... couldn't find it, do you mind to spell it our again, please?
 

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2023 Grand Cherokee Overland 4xe
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I don't know guys. Maybe I am crazy, but I drove one fully charged for 30 minutes and then a V8 immediately after and then back to the 4Xe and thought the 4Xe was a dog compared to the V8. I really, REALLY, wanted to like the hybrid but was not impressed with the acceleration, lag that it takes the ICE to turn on when you press the throttle, and general buzziness of the 4 banger. I thought it would be cool to be able to not use any gas during the work week, but it just isn't quite there yet, so I bought a SR Hemi.
I also drove an XC60 PHEV and that is light years ahead of the 4Xe for sure. More power, more range, better mileage, smoother transition off battery only. And it costs less.
Not trying to troll, just my experience.
Also if you haven't checked it out, the 4Xe forum has a ton of good info
Ours was funky then after a day or two the whole thing improved dramatically. We drove the XC60 also. Very nice but we wanted more room. Also we preferred the McIntosh over the Volvo high end system. It had the weirdest center speaker that sticks up on the dash. It also did not support Apple Play at the time. Maybe they took care of that. I’ve got a friend who has one - he said the Pure Google Nav system is very glitchy. In some cases owners have been locked out of the ride.
Also we really like the Jeep
Massage seats.
Overall in my opinion I think the Volvo is pretty nice - in our case we preferred the Jeep.
 

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2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee L Summit
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...That's also why the spare went outside.
I think it went there because it can, there is enough overhang on the L, like the durango. The 2 row couldn't fit the wheel there. I just hope they eventually do make a 4XeL, but who knows, as rare as I use it (I really only use it when I NEED the 3 rows, or cargo room, or the "Jeep" features (which is thankfully very rare), I'd be dumb to trade it for a different powertrain.
 

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... couldn't find it, do you mind to spell it our again, please?
It is post # 43 WL Trailhawk - 23 & Beyond 4xE Only?

Another link to the same kind of information:
Wrangler 4XE Drive Mode Analysis

It is always a hybrid. Unless, allegedly you engage in long accelerations with the battery depleted such as when you make consecutive runs at the drag strip. Though people have done that and it worked fine...I am sure that is technically a possibility but for all practical purposes it is not a concern. The battery is never depleted because it maintains a hidden state of charge. The battery is some 17.4 kWh but the usable amount is about 15 kWh. Since it retains this hidden 2.5 kWh hidden charge, even when the dashboard is showing <1% charge, what it means in reality is that it reached the lower threshold of 2.5 kWh sate of charge.

The same behavior can be induced manually when you press the e-SAVE button (which is configurable) for the state of charge (e.g., 60, 80 % - and you set it for battery save NOT battery charge). Note that e-SAVE has two settings buried in the UCONNECT system - you can configure it to charge or you can configure it to save and hold the SOC of the battery. I have always had it on e-SAVE SOC HOLD 80% which is the highest you can configure it at.

Even when I press e-SAVE at 100% SOC the moment I leave the house, it will drive away electric then switch to gas by about 20 mph. This behavior is repeatable again and again. The battery SOC might drop eventually drop a few % (e.g., 92-97%) but I have never seen it below that. The battery will charge from regenerative braking and occasionally from the engine, especially when cruising. The impact on the engine is equivalent to that of climate. One of the screens in the car will focus solely on the energy flow with 3 main components ENGINE, BATTERY and CLIMATE. My climate settings seem to use 2-3 kWh, whereas when I am in e-SAVE SOC HOLD 80%, battery charge hit on the engine might be 3-4 kWh on cruise control.

I have driven it from Washington DC to Chicago IL when I got the car (at Thanksgiving) and charged once on that trip. Never once did I not have the electric motor assistance, despite being less than 1% on electrons.

I can follow up with some screen shots today, but honestly I question my efforts because clearly people have made up their minds with alternate facts.
 

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The whole 4xe L debate was carried out on the other site. There were some relevant screen shots of the floor plan and there is zero reason to the casual observer why the battery could not fit in the floor of the L. If anything it could be bigger. Unlike the Wrangler 4xe which has a saddle type battery (at least by its outward appearance) under the rear seats, the Grand Cherokee 4xe has the same battery split between left and right sides.

I happen to think the more appropriate reason is marketing. WL75 (long) sells well. It is a novelty - it was the first redesigned Jeep Grand Cherokee to be introduced and sold 1.5 years alongside the WK2. Why introduce something new in your portfolio when you are not struggling for sales. Keep that option for when the sales become stagnant, or the line needs a refresh. Where's the inline 6 in the Grand Cherokee ? Same reason. Yeah, yeah, supply chain. But if they felt they really needed to make the car available with that engine to drive sales, they would have done so. It will eventually come.

Grand Cherokee 4xe



Grand Cherokee L



So...marketing or floor plan (engineering challenges)?
 

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I think it went there because it can, there is enough overhang on the L, like the durango. The 2 row couldn't fit the wheel there. I just hope they eventually do make a 4XeL, but who knows, as rare as I use it (I really only use it when I NEED the 3 rows, or cargo room, or the "Jeep" features (which is thankfully very rare), I'd be dumb to trade it for a different powertrain.
The three row I drive also has the external spare and yes, part of that is "because they could", but another reason is that the area for a well on the inside behind a third row seat isn't large enough for a tire. I suspect the same is true for the WL-75.
 

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2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
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The whole 4xe L debate was carried out on the other site. There were some relevant screen shots of the floor plan and there is zero reason to the casual observer why the battery could not fit in the floor of the L. If anything it could be bigger. Unlike the Wrangler 4xe which has a saddle type battery (at least by its outward appearance) under the rear seats, the Grand Cherokee 4xe has the same battery split between left and right sides.

I happen to think the more appropriate reason is marketing. WL75 (long) sells well. It is a novelty - it was the first redesigned Jeep Grand Cherokee to be introduced and sold 1.5 years alongside the WK2. Why introduce something new in your portfolio when you are not struggling for sales. Keep that option for when the sales become stagnant, or the line needs a refresh. Where's the inline 6 in the Grand Cherokee ? Same reason. Yeah, yeah, supply chain. But if they felt they really needed to make the car available with that engine to drive sales, they would have done so. It will eventually come.

Grand Cherokee 4xe



Grand Cherokee L



So...marketing or floor plan (engineering challenges)?
That new inline 6 in the Grand Cherokee would be really sweet.
 

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Grand Cherokee Summit Reserve
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This thread is getting busy, that's a good thing I guess.
What I was referring to was in Hybrid mode, which is what I would be using almost all the time, when cruising at around 50 mph and I floored it, it took at least a full second (or two) for the ICE to turn on and for the car to actually start accelerating. Not a huge deal, I just was surprised. I tried it a few times just to be sure something wasn't wrong. I initially thought in hybrid mode the ICE would always be on. I'd almost prefer that it was, or there was a mode that gave that option. I don't care about fuel economy, I just wanted the most powerful two row Grand Cherokee Summit Reserve I could get, and the Hemi was clearly that. Not some seat of the pants trickery either. I have owned 30+ cars, mostly high performance ones and can tell the difference in vehicle performance. I know it's a quick google search, but I would bet the extra weight of the 4Xe vs Hemi gives the Hemi a better power weight ratio.

Also to the gentleman talking about the McIntosh being better than Volvo Bowers & Wilkins. No way, in no world, is that true. The B&W is known to be one of the best you can get in a vehicle under $150K. I lived with one in an XC90 for three years and it was much better than the McIntosh. I am not trying to bash Jeep here. Last 6 cars I bought were Jeep, Jeep, Mercedes AMG, Volvo, Jeep ,Jeep. I love my GC and the McIntosh, just keeping it realistic here. You may not like the weird center speaker but it is like that for a reason.
 

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I did the research. The 4Xe SR is about 650lbs more than the Hemi SR. Which would be about 1/2 second difference in quarter mile times, V8 being the quicker with about a 10% better power to weight ratio. It's not seat of the pants thing, it's physics. Not that I plan on drag racing my Grand Cherokee any time soon. Again, I am not trying to poopoo the 4Xe. For some that is probably the better choice. I just want to be realistic.
 
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